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Alina Morse: 1 Million Smiles And The Candy Empire

Before I introduce the guest and make you aware of who she is, I want to tell you that I met her in New York while interviewing Danica Patrick at an entrepreneur event. I had seen her in the magazine and when I saw her there in New York I said, “I've been meaning to talk to you.”

I arranged this special show with her there and if you're just getting to know Alina, she is thirteen years old. She has a candy empire. What I mean by that is she started a company I believe when she was seven and started cranking a little bit after that. She’s always selling the candy message and it is a sweet message. What's interesting about this show is I feel empowered about what we're doing here at WealthFit with WealthFit Teen.

I'm excited to have her as our first interview of somebody that isn’t an adult yet but well on her way. A couple of big highlights in the show that I wanted to make you aware of. What's interesting is time management. She still has to go to school. How does she run a multimillion-dollar business with her family's support and help and yet have a lot less time than someone that's a full-time entrepreneur? This will resonate with a lot of us, especially if you're working a job or doing something and you want to build the thing or create the thing that you want to do full-time. That's a big thing to look for in this show.

Another thing to look for in this show is the commentary on the young generation, her generation. How does she see her generation? I’ll give you a little hint here, a little refreshing-ness her generation and what she is doing to create a business in her world. The other thing I thought which was interesting for some of us that are in the entrepreneurship path, this idea of giving back or giving. You'll discover in this episode her mindset and how they came to start a nonprofit, but also to donate a percentage of profits to charities.

If you've got young ones, you're definitely going to want them to hear this. If you need a kick in the pants from a thirteen-year-old, you're going to love this show too.

Alina
Lollipops will rot your teeth,” This is what your dad tells you. This is the classic line. I can totally relate having two young ones myself and probably said this once or twice, if not more. However, when you hear this, that propels you to start what would become a candy empire. Will you take us back and walk us through how this whole thing started with Zollipops?
I was only seven years old when I came up with the idea for Zollipops and it all started with that exact same scenario. My dad and I were at the bank and the bank teller had offered me a lollipop and my dad told me that I should not have candy because sugar is terrible for my teeth. I asked him, “Why couldn't you make a healthy lollipop that's good for my teeth so that I can have candy and it wouldn't be bad for me?” After being very tenacious and asking my dad about a hundred times about when are we going to make these lollipops? He finally told me, “Alina, if you want to get something done, you have to do the research, write down your ideas.” That's exactly what I did. After about two years of research and plant trials, I finally created Zollipops.
Dustin
You went out, you did research and from what I understand it took some time to do this research. Did you not find sugar-free lollipops? Did you just not find a product that you were happy with? Did it just not exist at the time? What was that like? What was the landscape like?
Alina
I'm sure as a lot of people have seen the sugar-free selection is very small and very boring. It's not that kids would want to have candy that was made for their grandparents. No thank you. As a kid, I looked into it and I was like, “This is the only sugar-free candy that they have and they don't have anything that's good for the teeth, anything that benefits you.” I was searching but I couldn't find any products like that. I decided that, “If I created a product like this, I'd be filling a niche. I can create a product that a lot of kids would like,” because I'm sure they face the same problems, having their parents tell them no. I decided that also I can make something sugar-free will also taste like a normal candy and something that kids would find fun and colorful and exciting.
Dustin
Maybe it’s your upbringing that your parents have walked you through essentially or brought you up in a certain way. Most people, they get this idea, “Why aren't there sugar-free lollipops?” They hear the same thing that you hear and they just shrug their shoulders. I don't want to make an assumption but a lot of kids thinking that when I was younger would just do the same thing and shrug their shoulders. What was it about you wanting to solve this problem? Do you feel like it was your upbringing? Had you been coming up with different ideas and this one just resonated? What was going through your head at that moment when you said, “Let's do this?”
Alina
I've always had an entrepreneur’s mindset. Ever since I was very young, I've always wanted to help people. When my dad read me the book, Rich Dad Poor Dad, when I was about three or four, I decided that business was a fantastic way to help people through starting a company. Now that I have an idea and that I researched it a bit, I can turn this into a successful company where I can help kids and help parents. I always had that mindset. My dad was a business consultant so he always thought, “An entrepreneurial mindset is great. I'm going to nurture it. I’m going to read her this book and hopefully, it will help spark her attention for a business.” It was the initial upbringing and I always had a little place in my heart for business. Starting the company was the obvious thing to do at that point.
Dustin
I was always thinking I'm going to leave Rich Dad Poor Dad in my son's room and just let them happen upon it. The fact that your dad read it to you just shaved years off of it. Thank you for that. It’s incredibly powerful for so many people. Here's the multimillion-dollar question. You're like, “I’m going to do this.” How did you know how to make candy or learn how to make candy when you had this idea and you wanted to execute?
Alina
It took a lot of re-watching the same YouTube video and just staring at it and trying to figure out how I could substitute which ingredients to make a healthy candy because I wanted all-natural flavors and colors because I have a dye allergy. I want it to be nut-free because one of my friends have nut allergies. Gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan, diabetic-friendly, everything you can think of. I wanted it to be a treat and I want it to be accessible for everyone. Therefore, I did a lot of watching YouTube, researching the different ingredients that I could switch out and then I went to the store. I picked out all the healthy ingredients and all the things I needed to make candy and I tried to make candy in my kitchen. That did not go well. I made a mess and my parents were not too happy about it. They wanted me to be creative, but they did not want me to ruin the oven. It was a great way for me to learn that I could not make it by myself just doing the experiment and then realizing that I needed a manufacturer and that helped me mature and realized that I do need a high-quality professional company. I went to several plants. I did plant trials until I finally found the plant that I wanted to make the Zollipops at and find all of the different flavors the different colors, everything about it.
Dustin
Sometimes when you're starting something, you're very close to it. You find the ingredients to do all this research, you’ve got the plant. Before we get to the plants, how did you know when it was good? Besides you tasting and saying, “I'd eat this.” How did you know that this is something that is viable?
Alina
I definitely saw that there was a niche to be filled. Just being so young and not having any baggage that adults have from being in the business world and struggling until finally succeeding. I didn't have any of the doubts or anything like that. I was just going all in like, “I want this to happen and all kids will like this to happen so we're just going to do it.” It was the attitude of just not being worried about what could happen if it failed. I just never thought about what would happen then and my parents were very supportive of it. That was definitely something that was big for me and I was just fearless.
Dustin
Imagine the first couple of batches you're sharing with people around you or maybe your friends. What was the feedback initially?
Alina
My friends didn't sugarcoat it, pun intended, but my friends wanted me to succeed and they wanted to tell me exactly how it was. I'm going to be honest, the first couple of batches were awful. Working with new ingredients that hadn't been worked with before or people that had worked with them had failed and given up, it was difficult to find the happy medium, the perfect color with using natural colors, the perfect flavor using natural flavors with the Xylitol and the Erythritol, the perfect balance. At first, it was definitely not good at all but it was just a lot of trial and error.
Dustin
Did you ever think that you would give up? You seem focused and driven to will it to happen but I'd be remiss if I didn't ask. Did you ever have doubts in the beginning?
Alina
As I said, I didn't have any doubts because initially, I was just like, “Nothing ever goes wrong in business.” I was a little seven-year-old girl. I had no idea that a business could go wrong. I thought you just come up with the idea and you make it happen and then you sell millions of dollars’ worth of it casually. I never had any idea that it would be difficult or that lollipops would melt or that it would be hard to get in the stores. I just didn't have any doubts.
Dustin
What does the business look like now? Employees? What are your projections? How long have you been doing this? What does it look like?
Alina
We have six employees that work in our Zolli office and they're fantastic. They're so passionate, they're so amazing and I couldn't ask for any better people to work with because business is a team sport. I learned that early on. You can't do anything without a team. We also have a lot of people that work not in the office every day but help us every single day. We have buyers helping us get into more retailers. We have brokers and it takes a lot of people. We have been doing well. We tripled in sales and we doubled the past years so that's very exciting for us. We have meetings every week trying to get into more retailers to reach more people and to help everyone smile.
Dustin
Retailing is fascinating. I'm guessing you went online with it or did you get one big contract and that got you going?
Alina
We had reached out to a Whole Foods buyer. Even though my dad was a business consultant, he'd never worked in the candy space before, so this was new territory for both of us. We reached out to a Whole Foods buyer just regionally and we set up a meeting. We had the meeting and it went fantastic. I was nervous at first, but I went in I did my pitch and they absolutely loved the product which I was so grateful for. They said we're going to bring it in and then six months later we are finally on shelves and that was so huge that we could just see our product on store shelves that you shopped at forever. We grew from there onto Amazon to Kroger and then into Walmart, which is over 4,000 stores. That was absolutely huge for us. Now we're working on getting into more retailers internationally. We just got our French packaging back for our French retailers. We definitely are expanding at a rapid rate I would say because it does take a while to get into these large retailers.
Dustin
I want to go a little back and it was about the pitch. How did you prepare for that pitch? I'm very curious as to the dynamic of you delivering it along with your father. How did you choreograph that or think through that when you entered into Whole Foods?
Alina
It was lots of teamwork. I definitely wanted to do a lot of the pitch myself just because I was just so excited. We drove to the store and it was far. We were practicing all the way there and I knew I pitch inside and out but I've also always had a theater, acting and singing passion. It's always been a passion of mine. I've always been confident in front of people and that's another big thing that I've always wanted to do something in TV or media. I always loved the whole marketing. I like going on TV shows and aspects like that. I just thought of it as a script and I was like, “I will just learn my scripts and then I'll play the part.” That's basically what it was but as for creating the whole pitch, it was just a lot of teamwork. We want to get the point across. That's our goal.
Dustin
You mentioned leading Whole Foods and other retailers. I’m not in the retail business or in the candy business but being an outsider, once you do secure a retail, I hear this leads to a whole new set of challenges especially if they place a big order. Has that happened where you had to problem solve because they said yes and now you've got this new set of challenges to work for it?
Alina
That definitely did happen when we got into the newest store, Walmart, which was our newest chain because there are so many stores and there were a lot of orders coming in. We are just pushing out every day, which was definitely a whole new ballgame for us because we had never been in that many stores per chain. That was definitely crazy. We’ve even used third-party logistics because there were so many POs. It was definitely crazy. We worked extra hard to make sure our manufacturer has lollipops running day in and day out so that we could get all the orders done. We literally had to ship to 42 distribution centers. FedEx was coming every day.
Dustin
How did you manage it all? You mentioned the team but how did you ensure that everything was getting delivered? How did you have peace of mind?
Alina
I certainly didn’t. Being at school, I didn't have complete peace of mind because I wasn't at the office. I have so much trust in my team. They are incredible and I know that they will do everything that they can to make sure that an order this magnitude will go right. Even the small orders, they make sure that they go right. I just have a lot of trust in the people that I work with. That's how I have somewhat peace of mind throughout that experience.
Dustin
We have folks in the eCom space and you did mention Amazon and getting the product there. What have you learned about working or getting your product into Amazon or listed there and selling? What are some big lessons that you learned that you can share with others that are doing something similar?
Alina
This is something with all the retailers that I've come across. Just keep going and keep following up. I use Amazon a lot at first to look up different products that could be on the market already. When I was wanting to create a product, I wanted to make sure that there wasn't anything out there so that we could be the number one and that we can grow this category. Definitely just to keep following up and to use the resources that you are given. Being so young because I was only about nine at the time. I wasn't the one having the direct e-mails with the buyers. My team at the time was definitely creating an environment where they were trying to explain everything they could to me so that I could understand what was happening. Being so young, I didn't understand all the things that happened behind the scenes before starting a company. Since then I have gotten a lot more involved and a lot more informed about how things happen. It's just a long process of getting into any retailer.
Dustin
I want to talk about what your day looks like. I understand that changes in the summertime versus when you go to show up at school. Give me both if you'll entertain us here. What does your day look like?
Alina
First of all, I wake up in the morning and I get ready for school and then my dad drives me to school. On the way there, we talk about anything that happened the night before and anything that's upcoming. We'll do anything that doesn't involve looking at a computer or looking at a phone because he's driving. We talk about any upcoming events that we go to because we go to trade shows, we go to meetings and any upcoming calls and then we'll talk about things that we can do to better the product and things of that sort. I go to school but then after school, I split my time into thirds. I have one-third from working on homework because it goes hand-in-hand with school. I have one-third for working on the company which basically consists of looking at data, statistics, working on marketing talking to customers and just all of the things that need to be handled electronically. In this day and age, there's so much use for electronics in your daily life and with business because everything's digital now. I have my final third for any extracurriculars that I have. I also like to use that to keep up on social media because social media is so important for marketing and it's one of my big goals, to be an influencer. I hit 10,000 on Instagram. I'm working to create good content to keep people engaged. Influencers just don't have to be models or actors. They can also be CEOs and women entrepreneurs, things like that.
Dustin
Would you say that you're pretty good with the free timeline? You said a third homework, a third business and a third free time. How do you feel you are when it comes to shutting off the homework shutting off the biz and doing free time stuff?
Alina
I would say I am pretty good at it. I do like some free time. Homework comes first because I want to do good in school and learn everything I can. The business is so important to me because it's my passion and I love being a kid too. I love hanging out with my friends. I love hanging out with my sister and my family. That's definitely something that I don't have a problem with. I know a lot of people have struggled with trying to also have a personal life along with their company or along with school. I definitely enjoy that aspect and making sure I’m still a kid because my parents are great about it. They always make sure that they bring that down like, “Alina, you have to make sure you have some time for yourself. You have to make sure you have some time to hang out with your friends.”
Dustin
Are you trying to graduate early so that you can focus on the business or are you just going to let that to play out?
Alina
I completely honestly have no idea. I'm still in middle school. I'm not even in high school yet. I'm not even looking into graduating early, but I definitely think that I want to learn everything I can and I want to make sure that I have all the opportunities that I can get educationally but also socially throughout high school. it’s always interesting to hear different people's stories and how things play out. I've talked to people that have graduated early and they've told me about their experience. They’ve talked about me when they finished high school with their company and they've told me about their experience. It definitely is an option that I would be looking into when the time comes but I honestly have no idea right now.
Dustin
What do your friends think about Alina the entrepreneur, the Founder of Zollipops?
Alina
My friends think it's super cool. They love Zollipops so it's not even, “Alina the entrepreneur.” It’s, “Alina that has a bunch of candy all the time,” and nobody knows why but it's good. They're super supportive. Whenever I have an assignment that I'm not sure about because I may have been absent, they're always willing to help me and the same thing with my teachers. They’re always very supportive. That's a big part of why I can succeed and why I can go to school and work on the company because I have a lot of people supporting me and a lot of people that think it's a great opportunity as do I. They make a difference.
Dustin
I was either reading something or I was listening maybe to a podcast and they were talking with Shaun White and how he didn't necessarily grow up in the best skiing snowboarding area and how that would be a perceived as a weakness, but he channeled that into a strength. I see your schedule a little bit because you've got school and you're running a business as well. A third of your time, you can't use it because you're at school and so that sets you up to be super productive later as soon as you graduate from that because you'll have a newfound time. You only have so much finite time versus other entrepreneurs. How do you determine what projects to tackle and you’re going to work on?
Alina
It's definitely taking the time to look at it and think, “What can I get the best outcome out of? What's the return that I can receive from this?” There's definitely something to be said for somebody that can sort out the things that are most important and do them first and then go back and finish the things that are maybe not as high up on the list. I feel like it's important to definitely get it all done to prioritize and to take a thorough look at it and think, “What can I get the most out of right now?” and not, “What can I do right now and then throw the rest away?” What can I get the most out of right now and then go and finish the rest and get the reward from that?
Dustin
The parts about the business that you like are marketing, the pitching and talking to the customers. Is that correct?
Alina
Yes, certainly. I've always loved talking to people being socially active because it's important. With all of the social media and the emails, call someone. Get on the phone and call someone. There are phones for a reason and it's not just for emails. That's something I have a strength in. I always love marketing because it's fun. Finding new ways to market to different people, you get to research different people, put yourself in someone else's shoes and think, “If I was this person, what would I find interesting? What would pop out to me?” I have always liked that aspect of the business.
Dustin
It's refreshing to hear you say marketing because I'm a marketing guy if you would say that. I love marketing. It's even more refreshing to hear you say, “Pick up the phone and talk to somebody,” especially someone of your age. You'd rather be on the Instagram or the Snap or text-based, not talking to someone physically.
Alina
That's definitely a problem and it’s also a misconception that a lot of people have for my generation. A lot of people think we’re lazy. We have the time, but we don't take the time to do it. I find that a lot of people do take the time and it's the people that are worthwhile. A lot of people that I've talked to that are very successful and have very good customer service, which is definitely a big part of being successful. They are people that pick up the phone and they don't make their employees do it. If you want to make something happen, you, the CEO, the one high up on the pyramid, if you want to if you want something to happen then you need to talk to them. If you're trying to make something better of, if there was an issue with the product, respond to a person and call them up and be like, “I'm sorry this happened with your product. Let me make it right.” That's definitely a big problem. When you're trying to communicate with a buyer and you're hounding on them through email, they can literally open your email, delete it and then never respond but if you call them repeatedly, they cannot ignore you. At least not for very long.
Dustin
What part of the business don’t you like? What’s your least favorite part?
Alina
I wouldn’t say I have a least favorite part of the business. That part that is not my strength is the accounting and logistics portion because I haven't gotten to the point in my school career where I can do the math that is required to do the conversions. I haven't practiced it in my school so that's one of the things that I can't do but I do like math. It's not that I don't. It's just that once I'm more educated through my school career about it, it will be a lot easier for me to understand it and a lot easier for me to do it.
Dustin
Mom and dad are in the business. What is your advice for family-run businesses? Maybe they have a young daughter or a young son that they want to follow in your footsteps and do the family business and leverage some resources. What is your advice on the whole family business?
Alina
I would say just be understanding and listen to everyone's ideas because it can be difficult not only working with your family but working with people in general. You're going to have disagreements and you're going to have different ideas on how to execute certain ideas. Don't be so closed in your mindset to the point where you can't reason with somebody and you can't understand somebody's side of the story and somebody’s perspective on a different idea. That's a big thing. I've always worked well with my family. We have a good business relationship, which I'm grateful for and I'm lucky that we haven't faced family struggles. Hear each other out.
Dustin
I’ve got to ask this because this is WealthFit Nation. We're all about money around here and investing and putting that money to work. Because you're thirteen right now, do you draw a salary?
Alina
I don't because a lot of it is reinvestment and then the rest of it is in our employees. We give 10% of our profit to support oral health education in schools across America and we also have a nonprofit. We're not about the money that's coming in. We're growing the value of the business. I'm not taking a salary but once we get to the point where we are very expanded then who knows possibly maybe at the point where I'll need a car maybe. I don't know.
Dustin
Alina, the teens that will listen to the show want to know, “Does she even get an allowance?”
Alina
For media, I have a media appearance fee. I do get that, but I don't get an allowance and a lot of the media or the appearance means that goes into a bank account. I can't touch that. My parents are super nice. They have gotten me some things for doing media. When I was in New York one time, I run to three or four appearances and then I had meetings and things. We went to the Apple store and my dad bought me AirPods, which I'd been wanting for forever because my PR director had them. I was like, “Those are so good. I need those for a birthday present or Christmas present.” That was my big guilty pleasure.
Dustin
We spent a great deal of time talking about Zollipops and I love the mission. I'm going to come back to ask you about what you think the future is headed. However, I want to invest some time here into One Million Smiles and the charitable causes that you’ve aligned yourself with. Can you speak a little bit about what’s going on there for you?
Alina
I did mention that we give 10% of all of our profits to support oral health education in schools across America because tooth decay is the single greatest epidemic facing kids in America now. We also have a separate non-profit and it's called One Million Smiles. That's where we give three Zollipops to schools and teachers across America to teach kids about the importance of oral health care and about entrepreneurship, which is so important to teach kids about entrepreneurship. Also, to teach them about science because Zollipop is simple chemistry. We have PH tests that teachers can do and we have a bunch of different ways that we can bring in entrepreneurship learning into the classroom while also keeping kid smiles clean.
Dustin
Where do you see the opportunity with One Million Smile is?
Alina
It was our initial mission for starting the company because early on in my research, I found that tooth decay was the single race epidemic facing kids in America now. When I found that out, I decided that I needed to create a program so that I could teach kids that this was happening. I found that what I want if I show them that you can have something that not only is good for you, but it also tastes good. It was a lot of things that I saw that a lot of kids don't have access to proper dental care and with Zollipops we can help change that. We are seeking a sponsor to expand One Million Smiles and that's a big thing for us because we've expanded it from 100,000 smiles to 250,000 smiles and then to One Million Smiles. That was a big jump for us but now we're looking to expand even more to ten million smiles which is a big leap. We see that it has been not only a teaching kids and causing kids to think about taking care of their teeth, but it's also driven people back to stores to buy lollipops. There's the profit coming off of that so that we can reinvest and it is also something for us to connect with communities and to connect with families. That's a big thing for us because we're a family-owned company and we want to connect with other families and other communities and make a difference.
Dustin
You mentioned a few times you have 10% of profits going to charity to the oral health to empower folks there. Target has done it for quite some time, TOMS shoes, these socially-driven things where they're giving a percentage of the product or a percentage of profits to charity. What are some big things that they need to be thinking about or what are some lessons that you have learned since committing 10% of your profits to charitable causes?
Alina
It was important from the start. Giving back and teaching people about your mission and your cause is always very important because you don't want people to think that you're just a company that's looking for money, but that you are a company that cares about the community cares about the customers and is trying to make a difference in the world.
Dustin
What is the new skill that you would like to pick up or master in business?
Alina
Accounting and logistics. Just to understand it all and be able to apply it.
Dustin
What’s your favorite thing or activity to do outside of work?
Alina
I like to sing. Anyone in my family could tell you that all I do is sing. When I have free time, I'm in my room singing. When I'm in the shower, I'm in the shower singing.
Dustin
Any favorite genres of music that you find yourself singing in?
Alina
All kinds of music.
Dustin
What's your advice for young entrepreneurs that are feeling motivated by your story and want to start something?
Alina
Write your ideas down to start people start. Do the research put the effort in and don't forget to ask questions because that was a big thing that helped me grow the company, which was asking people that have been in the industry for a while. It's important to ask people that have wisdom and be a sponge and soak up all the information that you can.
Dustin
We met at the entrepreneur event and I know you go to trade shows and you see people that are older than you. What do you see as a younger individual that you would advise maybe older entrepreneur to rethink or revisit?
Alina
If somebody that's older than me wants to start a company, don't think about the failure more than you think about the success. It's important to think about what could go wrong and always have a Plan B. You want to make sure that you are passionate about it and that you believe it can happen because a lot of times people are like, “This is a good idea.” I’m not just going to grow the company because it's a company. You have to be passionate about what you're doing or else you're not going to be motivated to keep going.
Dustin
I’m curious about your routines for success. Do you have any rituals? Do you have any things that you do to help you succeed in life?
Alina
I have to make a daily list of the top three things that matter and if you get all those done, if you had all those things, it's going to be a great day.
Dustin
What’s your favorite failure?
Alina
My favorite failure is probably the pops melting because it made us a better company and it made us stronger as a whole. We had to work hard to get the product fixed as a team and after that, all the problems seem very small and easy to fix because we had so much cohesiveness on the team. We knew how to fix big problems. Now we can fix the small problems with no problem.
Dustin
Alina, this is an interesting question I ask everyone and I’m going to reframe this one a little bit different for your scenario. When life is great, when business is going well and you want to splurge on yourself or you do a convincing job on mom and dad to buy you something. You mentioned your earbuds, so other than that, what would be your guilty pleasure spend or the thing that you like?
Alina
Whenever we're in New York, which is quite a bit, I always like to check Broadway plays ongoing. Usually, me and my dad will go see a Broadway play because I love Broadway and that's the only reason. It's a little treat at the end of the day. You've done good work. You've had good meetings. Now we get to go have a little bit of fun.
Dustin
I want to ask the final question about what I'm calling the candy empire. What do you see is the future for Zollipops and what’s the biggest thing that you’re working on that’s got you excited?
Alina
The biggest thing that we're working on is new products and new flavors and colors. We're getting into more retailers but as exciting as that is, the most fun part of owning a candy company is getting to create more products and getting to taste test more candy. We're working on molded products, new flavors, fun different colors and other snack items. We're definitely working on a lot of new things. That’s something that is exciting for us.
Dustin
I want to ask one more. It's going to be beneficial. What advice do you have for parents that see the signs in their kids? What advice would you give parents just to foster or to support their kids in their entrepreneurial tinkerings or endeavors?
Alina
Nurture their mindset because that's important. The biggest thing that you can do with your kids is to answer their questions and to listen to them. Please listen to your kids. Not everything that comes out of their mouth is just random words. They have good ideas and if you help them nurture their ideas and help them grow their ideas, it helps them grow as a person and it helps grow your relationship with them. I know a lot of parents they say, “All I want to do is spend time with my kids.” Listen to your kids. Working in this company with my family has helped me grow closer to them. We all have a newfound respect for each other. It's not just parents being like, “No, your idea is bad.” It's like, “That's a good idea. How about we take this approach to it?” Parents are still in-charge. I'm not saying kids, always talk to your parents. It’s not what I’m saying. Parents, just listen and help nurture their minds.
Dustin
For people that want to continue the conversation by a Zollipop or two or three and the Taffy as well and just keep tabs on what’s going on in your world. How can people do that?
Alina
You can check out Zollipops.com to get more information on our product. It has our retailers listed. Also check out our social media, @ZolliCandy on Instagram and our Facebook. We post daily there. We are always trying to get out rate content and make some exciting stuff for you. We have amazing giveaways on our Instagram, so make sure to check those out. If you're looking for some free Zollipops who doesn't love free Zollipops. We also have a YouTube at Zolli Candy as well. Just make sure to check those out and had your teacher sign up for One Million Smiles, which is a fantastic organization and we think people can benefit from it.
Dustin
Thanks, Alina for being on the show. You're an inspiration to so many. Keep getting after it and thanks again.
Alina
Thank you so much.

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