Share This Episode

Byron Chamberlain: The 2x Super Bowl Champion Disrupting American Football

Our special guest knows what it's like to win multiple times on one of the world's biggest stages.

He is a two-time Super Bowl champion and pro-bowler having balled for the Denver Broncos, Minnesota Vikings and Washington Redskins.

Born in Honolulu, his unique path led him to Wayne State in Nebraska where he became the school's all-time leading receiver, which caught the eye of the Denver Broncos, who drafted him in 1995.

Looking for his next challenge and perhaps his biggest yet, our guest now serves as the CEO of the San Diego Warriors at the newly formed Freedom Football League.

When he's not building championship teams or working on his golf game, he's traveling the US and the world, and has visited 46 US states and 48 countries.

Please welcome to the show, Mr. Byron Chamberlain.

Dustin
I want to start off by going back. In 1995, the setting is the Paramount Theater, Madison Square Garden. Wayne State's all-time leading receiver is waiting in the wings for his shot at playing in the NFL. The Denver Broncos make a move and they trade up. They trade their 11th and 72nd picks to the Atlanta Falcons for receiver Mike Pritchard and a pick in the seventh round. I've got to imagine it seemed like an eternity to you round after round, but Denver picks up the phone and with the 222nd pick of the draft calls your name. What's going through your head?
Byron
I was so excited. I'm such an optimistic person. There were some reports out there. Mel Kiper famously puts out his report every year. They had me projected to go anywhere from the second round to about the 3rd or 4th round. My expectations were a little high. Everybody around me and my camp had high expectations. When that didn't happen, you could see the mood of some people changing. For me, it never changed because I was thinking, “I want to be selected. I want an opportunity.” When the Bronco's called my name in the seventh round, there were some people around me who were bummed. I was like, “This is incredible. I got picked.” There were only 240 people that are going to be picked this year and I'm one of them. The Broncos believed in me enough to select me as one of their seventh picks in that draft. I was on cloud nine. It was something that I dreamed about for a while. It's something that I talked about with family and friends that I was hoping that day would come and it was finally there.
Dustin
I think back to when I was a young guy and I can't imagine being in your shoes, especially with the hype as early as the second round. You're in this place of gratitude. How did you put yourself there? How did you not let the hype get to you at such a young age?
Byron
It's been ingrained in me from my father and then from other coaches and things like that to set goals, to be a goal setter. That to me, when you are focused on a goal, you're not going to let anything get in your way, regardless of what it is. It wasn't about being selected in the 1st or 2nd round or whatever, my goal was to be picked. I wanted the opportunity and I had accomplished that. I had put myself in a position through all my hard work, through all the things that I accomplished in high school and college to get to that point. It was rewarding that the Broncos acknowledged that and they did select me.
Dustin
Did you go to Madison Square Garden?
Byron
I didn't go. I wanted to be with my friends and family. My family, they all flew up. The agent that I had at the time was based out of St. Louis, Missouri. We watched the draft at his house and then getting the call from Mike Shanahan was amazing. I'm watching the TV and you hear your name picked. He called in and as soon as they're calling the name, the phone is ringing at the same time.
Dustin
I thought that was a heads up.
Byron
Sometimes it is, but that was a delayed deal right there. They called my name and the phone rang at the same time. No one heard my name call except me, but everybody heard the phone ring. Everybody knew, “This must be going down right now.” I’ve picked up the phone. It's Mike Shanahan and he's welcoming me to the Broncos. He's excited about it and so was I.
Dustin
I look at it as like you've been beating the odds your whole life to get drafted. Not only that, to play in the NFL for nine years. I don't know what the odds on that are, but most people make it a year, a couple of years.
Byron
The average is somewhere between 2.5 and 3 years.
Dustin
Further, you go on and not only do you win a Super Bowl, but you also win back to back. I don't know what the odds are. You played in the pro bowl as well. I want to ask you about the Super Bowl. Is it as surreal as they say?
Byron
Yes, definitely. It's the biggest sporting event in America. It's one of the biggest events in the world. One hundred-eighty different countries watch the Super Bowl, so you're truly on the big stage. The thing for me was I was born in Hawaii. I grew up there part-time, but when we moved to the mainland, we moved here to San Diego. Our first Super Bowl was being played in San Diego right there in Mission Valley at Qualcomm Stadium. For me, it was a big deal. It was a huge deal. I've got tons of family here, tons of friends here.
I remember looking at the schedule before that year started. My best friend who was the running back on our team, Terrell Davis who also is from San Diego. He went to Lincoln High School. We're looking at the schedule when it comes out. You notice the Super Bowl is in San Diego this year, we’re like, “How cool would that be if we could make the Super Bowl this year and we could play it in San Diego?” San Diego is a place where I fell in love with the game of football, where I first learned how to play football. Adding all that to the mix made it unreal.
Dustin
You played San Diego that year. The next one was in Miami. How did you guys keep that composure? When you win something that big, it's easy to slip. You won. You got new guys coming in, some guy's leaving, but to maintain and go back to back is very rare. How did you guys keep that high level?
Byron
The thing is we always held ourselves accountable because it's human nature. When you have a goal, “I accomplished my goal, now I can relax.” We had some great leadership on that team. Guys like John Elway, Shannon Sharpe, Terrell Davis, Steve Atwater, a bunch of the hall of fame players that were great leaders. I remember Shannon Sharpe, our hall of fame tight end, getting in front of the team. He said, “We accomplished our goal. We won the Super Bowl. That's great. That's amazing, but to truly be remembered, to truly be special, you got to go back to back.” His exact words were, “Anybody can win one in a row.” If you want to be special, if you want to be remembered, you got to climb that mountain and be the king of the hill when everybody is gunning for you. It's a different dynamic when you’re climbing to reach the crown versus defending the crown.
Dustin
You don't seem like the guy to think back and look in the past, but do you ever catch yourself or have you caught yourself thinking back what if Atlanta hadn't made that trade? What if another team drafted you? Do you ever think about those?
Byron
I do because that's what makes you. Your path is what makes you who you are. I came to an amazing situation in Denver. I was with some brilliant offensive minds who understood my talents, my abilities and my weaknesses. I was speaking about this on a podcast the other day. One thing about Mike Shanahan and Gary Kubiak is they were very good at evaluating players and never putting you in a position where your weakness would show to the opponent. They tailored our game plans. They tailored the things that we did base on our strengths. They would never have a guy like me or Shannon Sharpe. We were more receiving tight ends.
They would never have us blocking a big 300-pound defensive end. We had another guy, Dwayne Carswell, who was like 270 and the strongest guy you’ve ever seen. They would put him in that position. They would put us on positions where we're running down the field, we're catching balls, we're putting mismatch problems on the defense. One of the biggest examples that I can give you of that is how we change our running game. Everybody knows Denver for their zone-blocking scheme. My rookie year, 1995, we were a man blocking team. Terrell Davis, our hall of fame running back, he had it over 1,000 yards. He was the lowest round draft pick to ever rush for 1,000 yards. They realized his strength is when you take the fullback out, put 6 or 7 guys in front of him and let him pick and choose his whole, which was the zone blocking scheme and that propelled his career to the hall of fame.
Dustin
Looking back at the NFL, what do you take away from that which applies to your everyday life now?
Byron
The discipline that it took, the hard work. That's the one common denominator in any industry that you're going to be successful in. You've got to work hard. Not only do you got to work hard, but you also got to work smart. You got to out-think your opponent and you got to outwork your opponent. It’s those types of things and always putting my strengths out there, but also when I'm in the lab, working on my weaknesses. My weaknesses become my strengths. I take some of those things away from the NFL and I apply them to the things that I am doing now.
Dustin
When you were playing in college, you played receiver, but in the NFL, you were a tight end. You made that transition. What was that transition and how did you deal with it? Why did they move you? Was it Shanahan finding your strength?
Byron
It was totally Mike Shanahan's idea and Gary Kubiak. I was a bigger receiver. They knew I could put on some additional weight and keep my speed. They made that decision to transition me from receiver to tight end. For me, it’s crazy. Did you play sports?
Dustin
I did. I played strong safety.
Byron
Imagine them coming to you and say, “You're a strong safety. We're going to move you to quarterback. We're not only going to move you to quarterback, but we're also going to wait until you get to the NFL to do it.” That's what it's like. It's like telling a sprinter, “We're going to make you a distance runner, but we're going to do it when you get to the Olympics. You're going to run against the top competition in the world.” I always look at change and transition. I have a certain mentality that I always accept because I know change is always inevitable.
The first thing that you have to do is accept the fact that change is coming and embrace it. The other thing is I started using all my resources around me. Shannon Sharpe was a guy that did the same thing. When they decided to move me to tight end, I went and told the equipment guy, “They're moving me to tight end, will you move my locker and put it right next to Shannon Sharpe?” Because he's a guy who went through that transition and he was at the top of his game. At the time when I got there, he was a 4 or 5-time pro bowler. He was on his way to the hall of fame. I said, “Let me use my resources around me, someone who's already navigated these waters and been successful doing it. He's right here in my locker room every day, let me go tap into that resource.” That's the thing that I did.
Dustin
That's a critical move and association is one thing we talk about on the show and putting yourself in the environment. You literally got yourself put right next to him. I want to talk a little bit about your other passion and that's travel. Your Instagram says 46 and 48. That’s 46 US States and 48 countries, but you went to Vietnam so is it 49 countries?
Byron
It’s 48 after Vietnam.
Dustin
What states are you missing?
Byron
I'm missing the three states in the Northeast; New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine and I'm missing Alaska. Those are the four I'm missing. I got to get to those four. I got to complete the United States. My goal is to get to 100 different countries, so 50 States, 100 countries.
Dustin
Are you putting any pressure? Is this organic? Is it every year you're going to pick three? How are you going about it?
Byron
It’s organic. I love to travel. I have some time that I can travel. Anytime there's the long holidays or any time that I don't have anything going on, I'll strategically plan trips. I'm in the process of putting a trip to Fiji together. I'm going to try to hit Israel. My niece is playing professional basketball over there in Tel Aviv. I’m going to go and visit her, but it also gets me to check off a country I haven't been.
Dustin
In all your travels so far, what place has surprised you the most?
Byron
I'm huge on history and culture. Going to places like Egypt and seeing the pyramids, going to China and seeing the Great Wall of China. One of the most impressive things was I went to Peru and seen Machu Picchu. Those things are incredible. Although my Fiji trip is going to be just relaxing at the beach, I don't try to do that. I try to go off the beaten path and experience the country, the culture and everything. Those are three that stand out in my head right now.
Dustin
Do you got any travel hacks? Flying so much and traveling, do you have any favorite tips or strategies you use to make it easy?
Byron
Not that I can think of off the top of my head. This is the one thing I do though, when you're going into a country or when you're coming back to this country, when you get off that plane, run to beat the line at immigration. I walk fast or have a little track going on. That would be my travel hack is the fact that if I'm not sitting in first-class or business class, always try to sit near the front of the plane so I can be one of the first persons off.
Dustin
They got that global pass. That is key when coming back in. I want to talk about schooling. You're back in school. You're going after your MBA at Fordham. You're on the West Coast, but Fordham is in New York. How did you come to pick Fordham?
Byron
Fordham is one of the great business schools in our country. A friend of mine, Jack Brewer, who's a former NFL player as well as a professor there. He helped put together this executive MBA program. It's specifically for athletes and entertainers. He put this thing together. There are twenty other former NFL players. There is an Olympic gymnast. There's Rohan Marley who is Bob Marley's youngest sons, who is a part of our program. That's how we picked Fordham. We use it through the NFL. We went through the NFL, which has a tuition program. If you're going to complete your Bachelor's, Master's, even PhD, the NFL will pay for it as a former player. The thing is they'll pay for your tuition and your books, but you got to cover everything else.
The thing that I love is how Fordham has stepped in with their support. They're paying for everything else for the guys. They're paying for our travel, our hotel, while we're there, our meals and everything. We don't have anything to worry about but focus on school. It's been a great program. The other part of that too is I've always had this goal to complete my Masters. I tell people, football got in the way for many years there and some other things. To me, it's about having that goal and not letting anything get in your way of that goal. Not even the distance that it takes from LA to New York. You got to get on a plane and make that sacrifice of being away from your family or whatever for the time to accomplish that. It's important to me, so I'll do that.
Dustin
How does it work? Are you getting on a plane Monday morning, flying, catching a class, flying back, doing homework, flying?
Byron
When I'm there, I'm usually there a week at a time. I'll leave on a Sunday. The class starts on Monday. I'm there from Monday to Friday. All classes are accelerated. They're cramming all this stuff into a week. You may have multiple tests during that week but in the end, you're taking a test. I did my statistics class. We have people talking about how statistics made them change their majors. Imagine doing a statistics class like that in a week. These professors that we have are not taking it easy on us. It's the real deal. I am proud of myself for how I handled that. I got a 91 on the finals.
Dustin
I got to ask about the rooming experience. Probably your first college experience is a little different than now. Are you bunking up in this?
Byron
No, we have our own room.
Dustin
It's funny because I was thinking about when prepping, you're back at school. School led you into football. Along with that, you're back in football now. You were the CEO of the San Diego Warriors for the Freedom Football League. What is the Freedom Football League and why get behind this seeing that the XFL is out the previous league before that? What made you want to get involved with this?
Byron
The Freedom Football League is a new spring professional football league. It's founded by 50 former NFL players and as well as 50 businessmen and women. It's a ten-team league. We're planning on playing our first game in the spring of 2021. Why did I get involved with this? Because I love football. I understand that there's room for another league. There's room enough for spring football. It's been tried before. Most of those leagues have failed. We looked at it differently. We looked at exactly why did these leagues fail. How can we do it differently and do something that will be sustainable? We've come up with some different ideas that we want to try to implement. They’ve never been done in sports, but they've been done in business before. They proved to be very successful in other businesses, but they've never been tried in sports. That's the main difference. What’s going to set us apart is the fact that all these other leagues that have tried and failed have tried the same formula. For me, if you're trying the same thing over and over again and you're failing, you may want to mix it up a little bit and try something different.
Dustin
One of those things I find fascinating is this whole ownership idea and giving it to the fans and giving it to the players. Can you elaborate more on that?
Byron
That's our secret sauce. That's something that’s been done in other industries. I've seen it done in my home state of Hawaii particularly with a grocery store chain that was literally dying and dead. They changed their business model where they made their employees. They gave them ownership shares. You get a different type of employee after that because you get someone that now is like, “I'm not just working for this company. I own part of this company. This is a reflection of me and my efforts as well. When people come to this store, if they don't have the experience that they need, I'm going to fail as an owner, not just an employee,” because an employee is looking for a check.
That's the one thing that we've done. We have taken our ownership model. We've broken it down where the actual Freedom Football League is going to own 25% of every team. They will have a CEO owner-operator who owns the other 25%. The remaining 50% will be split between fans and players, 25% to fans who buy season tickets, 25% to players who are playing in the games. They'll have contracts as well. They'll make a salary, but they'll also have the ownership shares in the team. We feel like the teams that are successful and the reason they're successful is directly because of the fans and the players. The fans buy season tickets. They buy hats, sweatshirts, pay for parking, all kinds of stuff that usually goes to one owner. The players are making the team successful by their efforts on the field, whether it's practice, whether it's playing in the games, winning games, winning championships. We want them to be our partners in this with us. As we grow, as we succeed, they succeed. It's not that way in other leagues. Other leagues haven't done that.
Dustin
What's been the biggest challenge in selling this message or communicating this different vision of football?
Byron
The biggest challenge is the fact that other leagues have tried and failed. When we talk to different people, we talk to potential investors or whatever, that's all they can see. It's hard for them to envision something that's never been successful. With our model, it gives us a better chance to succeed in any of these other leagues that have tried and failed. I tell this story all the time too. This is coming from a player's perspective because that's the one thing that you're going to need. You're going to need great players. We're not going to get the guys that are playing in the NFL right now, but we'll get all the best of the rest to start our league. As we get going and what hopefully down the road will be successful with us, it's a challenge for the top players that are coming out of college. As a player, from a player standpoint, I tell this story to people.
Imagine when I played for the Denver Broncos, when they drafted me in 1995, I think about our franchise then. It was probably worth about $450 million to $500 million at the time. Imagine with my contract, Pat Bowlen, who's a great owner. I loved Pat Bowlen. Imagine he threw in there, “We're going to give you a little small ownership share of the team as a player.” After the success we had going to the playoffs, back-to-back Super Bowls, by the time I retired, the Broncos were probably worth about $1.6 billion. Imagine if I had a little ownership share, Mr. Bowlen would still get wealthy. I may have done a little better off though.
Dustin
What about me as a fan? I want to get on that.
Byron
If you're a season ticket holder, they get people who support with their finances. They support the team, not just with their voices and whatever, but they fill the stadium. They pay for parking. All the memorabilia, whatever, they pay for that. Imagine if they got something back for that as well. As a fan, I know we're here in San Diego and a lot of San Diego fans feel jilted that the Chargers are in LA now. When they used to say, “That's my team.” You hear that all the time. It's truly your team.
Dustin
You have the title of CEO and Jeff Garcia who is a former NFL quarterback is your GM. I don't know the breakdown of these titles in the football leagues. What does a CEO do versus a GM?
Byron
As a CEO, you're in charge of the entire franchise. You're in charge of the business portion of it as well as the on-field portion of it. My general manager will take care of the on-field stuff, putting the team together, coaches, players and all that stuff that has to do directly with the team. He doesn't have to worry about the marketing aspect of it, the sponsorship aspect of it. That responsibility falls to me as well.
Dustin
What if you become hot to trot on a certain player, are you giving the GM the reigns or are you going to voice your opinion on it?
Byron
I'm definitely voicing It. Jeff and I have a great relationship. We go back for a long time. That's why I had no hesitation when I needed a GM to go call Jeff and say, “I would love you on board.” Jeff knows I'm a football guy. I've evaluated the players. I've coached. I've been a scout before. He understands that and I will not hesitate to give him suggestions. It's his job to do. If I see a guy that I like, I'm definitely going to say, “Jeff, what do you think about this guy? Let's talk about it. Let's make a decision on this guy.”
Dustin
You've undoubtedly been a part of championship teams. You're building a team. I'm curious as to what you're excited about in this team. You’ve got Jeff on board, but as you build out your organization now, as a business leader, a business owner, what's got you most excited about this particular team, your executive team and all the people that are working with you?
Byron
One of the things that's got me excited is everybody believes in the vision. Everybody believes in the fact that there needs to be a change in sports. The other underlining thing that's here is the fact that we're bringing a new business model to the world of sports. We're bringing a business model that has worked in other businesses. It's never been tried in sports. If we're successful with this thing, we can not only change professional football, we can change the landscape of sports in general because there will be a soccer team and some soccer fans will be like, “Why don't I have any ownership of this soccer club? I support this team for twenty years.” There will be players that will be like, “We're winning the championship. We're bringing eyeballs to this team. We've increased their valuation, why am I not getting a piece of that too?” It can potentially change sports. Everybody on our executive team, everybody that says a member of our organization, they believe that. They believe in our vision. I'm excited about that.
Dustin
Are you going to go after Johnny Football?
Byron
If Johnny Football is available to play and if Johnny Football is right, we would have no problem bringing him in. The thing about it is we want to get the best talent that's out there. The NFL has the best 1,200 football players in the world right now. There are a lot of guys out there who can play. For whatever reason, they don't have the opportunity whether they got cut, they made it to the last cut in training camp or they got injured or something and they had to sit out. They went to college. They didn't do it academically and they had to stop playing for some reason, whatever reasons. We're looking for those guys who are out there that can play football at a high level and bring it in. There had been a discussion of would we allow women to play. That’s an interesting discussion. We've kicked around some ideas or whatever. What I stood up in front of everyone when we were having this discussion is saying the same thing. We're looking for the best football players. It doesn't matter what label they have or what group they belong to. We're looking for the best football players on the planet.
Dustin
I was going to bring up Kaepernick and he got a workout though. Did you hear about that?
Byron
I heard about that. That's an interesting thing. I don't know what I feel about that. There's a lot of stipulations going on his workout. I’m not sure if it's a real opportunity. It's something that's never been done before. You've never seen the NFL hold a workout for one player usually. The teams will call your representative. They'll ask you to come in and work out for them or if it's a group of teams, they might hold a workout in a specific location, but this is the NFL doing this. For me, something doesn't feel right. It's a one-day workout, which is on a Saturday, which was interesting, right before the games on Sunday. How many coaches? How many GMs do you think are going to be at this workout?
Dustin
You've accomplished so much. What are you most excited about? What projects are you working on? Obviously, you’re working on Freedom Football League. Are there any other things that you're working on that you're excited about to execute, to bring into the world these days?
Byron
That’s what I'm focused on right now. I'm focused on this Freedom Football League. It's been a thing that we've put in years of work so far. We've got another year and some change before we kick off our first game. That's got a lot of my time and attention, my MBA program and that's a lot, as well as the travel. The other biggest thing is my daughter is in college right now as well. My daughter is a freshman at Otis College in Los Angeles. She's an art student. She's an amazing artist. I’m trying to help her as she navigates her first year through college and beyond.
Dustin
One more thing, it popped in my head, many athletes come into money. This is the Get WealthFit show. We cover entrepreneurship. We cover investing. We cover money management. I'm curious as to what your advice is to the athletes coming in that are maybe seeing the money that they've never seen before. How have you managed? What advice do you have for them to think beyond the payday that they're getting now but into the future?
Byron
Like most athletes who are coming into money, I was very naive. I got my first checking account as a senior in college. I didn't know anything about credit. I didn't know anything about taxes. I didn't know anything about anything. I got a rude awakening when I didn't understand that this is my responsibility. My rookie year I was slapped with a $60,000 tax penalty. I blamed someone who was supposed to be taking care of it, but that's my responsibility ultimately. It forced me to start learning things. One of the good things though about me, the lucky thing about me is by nature, I'm frugal. I don't want to spend money. I wanted to save it.
What happened was, about my 3rd or 4th year, I wound up buying a house. When I decided where I was going to be post-career, I wanted to be in Los Angeles, I wound up buying a duplex. That to me was the luckiest investing that ever happened to me because I realized like, “I can have a place and it can make income for me. I can live in it and still make it or I could have other people living in it and make an income. That's the light bulb that went off in my head. Six properties later, that's where I'm at. That’s what worked for me as far as investing in whatever. I do a lot of investing in real estate and multi-unit places. I fell into it saving my money because I didn't like to spend money. I was like, “I want to live in LA.” I was looking for places, I was looking for houses. I ran up across a duplex in the Miracle Mile area. The seller wanted to leave. They had family in Las Vegas and their family was getting older and sick. The price was reduced dramatically from what it was worth. For me, it was a no-brainer.
Dustin
It's smart. Being frugal is good. Not everyone can subscribe to that or does that, but you made that key move, which was you put it into the property. You had money now coming in because you put your money to work for you.
Byron
What advice would I give to young athletes? I guess the number one piece of advice that I would give is to think about understanding that your career has a lifespan. You're bringing all this money in right now, but when you're done, it's going to stop. What avenues are you going to put in place while you're playing that are going to generate income for the rest of your life. Think about that. The other piece of advice is this, there's a lot of keeping up with the Joneses in professional sports. You go to an NFL locker room. I've seen this firsthand with guys that I tried to mentor. You might see a guy and he's in his 7th or 8th year. He may be making about $14 million, where you're in your 1st or 2nd year and you're still on a rookie contract.
You don't have to try to compete with that guy, but you see that. I had a young guy that I mentored in Minnesota when I was in my seventh year. I was coming off the pro bowl and I had my Super Bowl resume. You use your resume to get different contracts. I had a deal where I had a $15 million signing bonus. I went out and bought two new vehicles, but this is my seventh year in the NFL. I had been doing this for a while. We had a rookie. He wants to buy the same vehicles that I have. I immediately told him, “No, don't do that. Save your money.” This was in a training camp. He saw the cars and he wanted to buy one for him and his girlfriend. Save it, if you have to wait until you played about 3 or 4 games and collected a couple of paychecks and game checks. Game checks are different than the preseason checks.
I'm like, "Collect a couple and if you have to do it, do it then.” He couldn't do it. He went out and did it. It seemed like the minute he bought those vehicles, his performance went downhill. He winds up getting cut. Now he's stuck with these vehicles and he's trying to pay them off. He wound up sitting out a year. No one picked him up. The next year, the New England Patriots picked him up and he wound up playing 7 or 8 years in the NFL. He always comes back to me and he's like, “You gave me some great advice as a rookie. I'm sorry, I didn't pay attention” because he struggled for a while. He put himself in a tremendous amount of debt. That's what I would say. Don't try to compete with everybody. It's not about keeping up with the Joneses. One of the best pieces of advice that I've ever gotten is you can do anything in this world you want. You can buy anything in the world you want as long as you have a budget for it.
Dustin
I appreciate you being here on the show. People can check you out on Instagram @BC_Chamberlain. Any website or things that people can check you out on?
Byron
They can check out the Freedom Football League on FreedomFootball.co.
Dustin
I know you have to disclose certain things, but is there any way where they can find information if they want to invest in a team or be part of it?
Byron
If they want to be part of it, if they want to invest in the team, they can go on FreedomFootball.co. There's a Contact Us button there. It will prompt you to if you want to invest in the league, if you want to invest in a certain team, if you want to be a part of our movement. We're still looking for people with these different organizations. That's a ten-team league and I'll quickly read off the cities. We have a team here in San Diego. We're in Oakland, Portland, Oregon, Oklahoma City, Austin, Texas, Columbus, Ohio, St. Louis, Missouri, Birmingham, Alabama, Hartford, Connecticut and Orlando, Florida. We're going into markets that the NFL is not in. We're trying to fill that void. We said, “We're trying to be in the spring league and hopefully our goal is to own the spring and summer like the NFL owns the fall.
Dustin
Is that the official tagline?
Byron
No, I made that out.
Dustin
You should trademark that or something. That's good. Byron, I appreciate you big time for what you're up into the world. You shared a lot of great stuff, a lot of wisdom. I appreciate it that you're paying it forward. You talked about mentoring guys just like guys mentored you when you were in the league. What you're up to in the world like you're a student and that's what we love here at WealthFit is that you're a student. You're not physically in school but you're always learning.
Byron
The thing is you never stop learning. That's one of the things that I've always been about is learning in every different area, every different aspect. My daughter is like me; she wants to know everything. It's a great thing to be. It’s a great thing to have, never stop learning.
Dustin
Thank you for checking out the show. As we say, share the wealth. If you know someone that would benefit maybe a young up and coming athlete or someone that you know needs that touch of inspiration or a fanatical football fan, this is something new and exciting to share with them. Share the wealth and be sure to hit Byron on Instagram and on Twitter and check out his website. That is it for now. I can't wait to have you back for the next show.

RELATED TRAINING

 in 

INVESTING

podcast
Mobile Home Millions, Lifestyle Design & Taps

In this episode, Doug Ottersberg, business and life strategist and the co-author of The Serious Business Owner's Guide to Serious Business Success, sits down with Dustin Mathews to talk about financial success and shares his top tips for building wealth and breaking into the industry of mobile home investments.

Mobile Home Millions, Lifestyle Design & Taps

Listen Now
podcast
Rebounding From A Near Death Experience, Bankruptcy & The Crash

In this jam-packed episode, Dustin is joined by real estate investor and tech entrepreneur, Steve Jackson. Listen in and hear the "close calls" that finally led to the dream of having a portfolio of passive income-generating properties.

Rebounding From A Near Death Experience, Bankruptcy & The Crash

article
A Beginner’s Guide to Investing in Oil & Gas

Learn the top 6 ways to invest in oil or gas from anywhere — PLUS discover the specific tax advantages to petroleum investing.

A Beginner’s Guide to Investing in Oil & Gas

Cash Lambert

Read Now
podcast
My Worst Investment Ever

In this thought provoking episode, Andrew Stotz takes us through his worst investment ever, and breaks down the six core ways people lose money. Grab a notebook and pen, because this episode is sure to transform the way you view investing and give you a deeper understanding of the stock market and how to build wealth.

My Worst Investment Ever

podcast
Title Insurance Explained

If you've ever purchased a property, you've almost certainly had title insurance reducing your risk. But what happens when things go wrong? Jeff Gross, explains all in this eye-opening episode.

Title Insurance Explained

podcast
No Money Down Deals & Creativity In Real Estate

Real estate investor Gary Wilson discusses how to get into real estate no money down along with other creative financing strategies for investing in real estate.

No Money Down Deals & Creativity In Real Estate

podcast
The Perfect Portfolio, Gold & Silver and the Wealth Triangle

Founder of Perfect Portfolio, Minesh Bhindi, explains how to find the right investments and why gold and silver are worth investing in.

The Perfect Portfolio, Gold & Silver and the Wealth Triangle

podcast
4 Interesting Takeaways from the Berkshire Hathaway Annual Meeting

Each year, the country’s top investing and money-minded individuals gather at the Berkshire Hathaway Annual Meeting. Get insight into this exclusive event with Dustin's major takeaways.

4 Interesting Takeaways from the Berkshire Hathaway Annual Meeting

article
The Simple Guide To REITs: How To Invest In Real Estate With Less Risk & Regular Returns

Thinking about investing in a Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT)? Learn what they are, how they work, and how to pick the best one for you.

The Simple Guide To REITs: How To Invest In Real Estate With Less Risk & Regular Returns

Abhi Golhar

Read Now
article
How To Take Investing Seriously & Stop Playing With Your Money

Don McDonald dispels the most common myths about investing and lays out a strategy for a balanced portfolio and consistent returns.

How To Take Investing Seriously & Stop Playing With Your Money

Don McDonald

Read Now
Creative Real Estate Investing Showcase

Creative Real Estate Investing Showcase

Behind-the-Scenes on 3 Unique Investment Deals

WealthFit Trainers

Watch Now
Private Lending Showcase

Private Lending Showcase

Behind-the-Scenes on 4 Successful Real Estate Loans

WealthFit Trainers

Watch Now
Real Estate Wholesale Showcase

Real Estate Wholesale Showcase

Behind-the-Scenes on 2 Successful Wholesale Deals

WealthFit Trainers

Watch Now
Real Estate Fix & Flip Showcase

Real Estate Fix & Flip Showcase

Behind-the-Scenes on 13 Successful Rehab Projects

WealthFit Trainers

Watch Now
The 7-Figure Landlord

The 7-Figure Landlord

3 Keys to Building A Portfolio of 500+ Cash Flow Properties

Gregg Cohen

Watch Now
Facebook Messenger Marketing

Facebook Messenger Marketing

How To Find Your Next Great Investment Property on Big Blue

Bob McIntosh

Watch Now
Facebook Live Marketing

Facebook Live Marketing

How to Exponentially Increase Your Number of Leads Using Facebook Live

Bob McIntosh

Watch Now
podcast
Secrets of a "Financial Concierge"

Anything can happen in the world of finance. Travis Jennings teaches you to use the tools at your disposal to make (and keep) your fortune.

Secrets of a "Financial Concierge"

article
What's the Difference Between Naked Options & Covered Options?

What are the differences between naked and covered options? If you're an investor, you need to know how to use either (or both) correctly.

What's the Difference Between Naked Options & Covered Options?

Justin McCormick

Read Now
article
The Short & Simple Guide to Employee Stock Options

What are employee stock options and how do you use them? It's simpler than you might think.

The Short & Simple Guide to Employee Stock Options

Lance Cothern

Read Now
article
From Zero to Hero: Get a Financial Education & Start Investing Right

You don’t have money—yet. Learn how to begin businesses, invest in real estate, and make your start in the stock market from scratch.

From Zero to Hero: Get a Financial Education & Start Investing Right

Andy Tanner

Read Now
article
How to Make Money Using the 5 Profit Centers of Rental Properties

Want to invest in real estate? Here are the 5 biggest things you need to consider before investing in property.

How to Make Money Using the 5 Profit Centers of Rental Properties

Ali Boone

Read Now
article
7 Real Estate Investing Shortcuts: How to Get Started with Less Upfront Cash

Any cash you put in a real estate investment is cash you can’t use elsewhere. Here are 7 ideas to get that upfront cash as low as possible.

7 Real Estate Investing Shortcuts: How to Get Started with Less Upfront Cash

Justin McCormick

Read Now
Rental Properties 101

Rental Properties 101

How To Buy Your First Cash-flowing Rental (The Right Way)

Deslyn O’Dell

Watch Now