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Chris Beer: Dirty Windows, ‘The Pit’ & How To Decide

I am excited to bring you my guest. She is a member of the WealthFit community. She’s an incredible human being that has a background in options trading for over twenty years. She pivoted and is now consulting, showing business owners and entrepreneurs how to look at the data to make better decisions and to bring in new customers and clients.

Our special guest is Chris Beer and in this show, we cover a lot.

We talk about content creation.

We talk about options and what it was like being there in the pit back in the day when they used to run papers back and forth to complete trades. We also talk about a very important thing on the show, which is depression and mental health, how to recover from it.

This is going to resonate with a lot of entrepreneurs or a lot of high achievers that may be grinding and finding themselves spent burnt out or finding themselves with a lot of pain. It’s a very important discussion that you will benefit from big time.

We also talk about authentic networking and what does that mean and the right way to do it. This show wouldn't be complete without a conversation about thoughtful risk-taking. With that said, let's get to it.

Dustin
Chris there you are in the heart of all the action, the trading room floor also known as The Pit. It’s where traders are yelling and flashing hand signals. It's amazing that you started here at sixteen-years-old but the stress, that pressure-cooker atmosphere and the grind finally catches up with you.
You hit pause and spend three months in an intensive outpatient program for depression. I want you to take us back to what's going on in your world at this moment in time to get you to essentially join this program and to let the world and let yourself know I need help.
Chris
I always liken depression to living in a house with dirty windows. You notice things don't go from 0 to 100 overnight. A little grime builds up, a little grime more and all of a sudden, you can't see out. That's what happened. I am a high achiever and kept throwing things on the pile.
I was neglecting my health.
I was feeling pretty severe depression and anxiety but refusing to address it. The further those things go unchecked, the more despondent and hopeless you feel. I got to the point in January of 2013 where I felt extremely hopeless. I considered taking my own life and began making actionable plans towards that goal. I was the mother of two young kids at the time my kids were two years old and nine months.
I had my own trading business, a successful career and a very happy marriage. On paper, I had it all. Isn't it funny when you think that people have it all and they don't? I was crumbling inside and started to crumble on the outside and finally reached a breaking point where I did reach out for help.
Ultimately, my husband helped me call a helpline that is run through our local hospital. They do a wonderful job of triaging the situation and telling you what tools they have in their toolbox. From there, they look at the logistics for you and that was the key thing for me because it's one thing to tell someone, “You should do this. You should do that. You should call this doctor who's great, I have this program that's great.”
When you're in the throes of depression, it's hard to formulate thoughts. It's hard to pick up a phone. It's hard to put words together. It's hard to think about your insurance premiums and whether things are in-network. Who's going to watch my kids and who's going to help me get time off of work and all of the logistics of life?
The amazing thing about this helpline was that they asked enough questions too to help weed through those logistics for you. You knew that the suggestion, the tool from their toolbox would be a good fit for you because they told you, “This is in-network with your insurance and this will be your copay. You said that you're free on Tuesday. Let's book that appointment for Tuesday at 4:00 PM.”
The most miraculous thing was that on Tuesday at 5:00 PM, they gave a phone call and said, “Did you go?” It’s that accountability because it's one thing to reach out for help and maybe whoever is helping you is not a fit or you felt like, “That was a moment of weakness and now I need to stop that weakness.” I was blessed to find a program that was a very good fit for me. That being said, I was not the student in the front row to begin with. I did hesitate a little bit about leaning into it because I thought, “All I need is a break. I need to hit the break. I need a couple of days off work. I need a couple of good night’s sleep. I'll be fine.”
My husband pointed out to me, “You've never have asked anything. Why are you going to not put everything into your health?” It was a big wake up the moment that for all of the success that I've had has come from jumping into things and taking care of my mental health did deserve all of my attention. I'm so glad that I did. I ended up being in the program for three months.
I treated it essentially as a job.
I went to the hospital from 8:00 until 5:00 every day, five days a week. It was a combination of group therapy, one-on-one therapy and some good skills that are coping strategies. A little more woo-woo art therapy and things like breathing, breathwork and evaluating choices that you make. It was something that definitely I had to hit pause on my career for, but without hitting the pause button I wouldn't have been able to hit play.
Dustin
That decision to pick up that phone and call I feel is so pivotal and very courageous, what do you say to that person, Chris? That was like you, that had been presented with the opportunity but it's going to look bad. What are people going to think? What if my career crumbles? What was that impetus, that turning point moment that had you dial? Was it your husband? Was it you had too much? What was that moment?
Chris
It was my husband's urging. It was that things were not getting better on their own. It was that I needed to call in some outside help. It was outside of my pay grade. It was a combination of medication and therapy and some life adjustments that ultimately got me on a different path.
Dustin
You're an achiever. I feel like this is a very slippery slope, especially when for me I had something very similar. I ended up putting myself in the hospital and would have migraines because I was grinding too much. You talk about lifestyle changes. What were some of the bigger lifestyle changes that you had to account for now to make sure you didn't fall back into performing the way you did before?
Chris
If something burns you once, you want to stay away from that. That's what you think immediately. I thought, “I can never go back to work. I could never go back to trading. That's what almost killed me.” That is not anywhere near the truth. It was a combination of factors, but I did decide that something had to be a bit different. After the three-month stint in the outpatient program, I took a couple of months off from working outside of the home. I spent a great summer with my young kids. After that, I went back to work with a trading firm but in a little less intense capacity and I got back up. I have to tell you, the first time that I went back in The Pit, I was terrified. People would make fun of me for being weak, for pulling out and for sitting on the sidelines. That was the furthest from the truth. People are at the core kind, compassionate and everyone has been touched by mental illness. Everyone has a story of someone who's been knocked down, needed help and hopefully ultimately gotten back up.
Dustin
I appreciate you sharing that story, owning it and inspiring. I know there are multiple people tuning in to the show that it will touch, move and inspire. You're a shining example of that. Thank you for that. I've only seen the Wall Street movies and whatever imagination in my head. My research says that you got started at sixteen. Is it true when you got started, you were on the floor when you were sixteen? How does that happen?
Chris
I’ll take you back to the late ‘90s, and at the time the trading floor was a very bustling place. For the most part, electronic trading was not a thing yet. The 90% of the transactions happen just like you would see in those movies, people yelling, screaming hand signals, and the whole shebang. You needed tons of people to make that happen because we had these positions that were called runners. I was hired as a runner. My friend's dad worked down there and offered to get us both jobs as runners. We thought it’s different than waitressing, let's give it a go. As a runner, you would literally run orders that were on a piece of paper from one side of the floor to the other. It’s pretty much across the football field. You'd also run out all sorts of fun errands like you went to go get people's sandwiches and whatnot. My friend and I started this job for a summer. I stayed for almost twenty years.
Dustin
That is insanity. Is it still crazy like that now? Has that been diminished? Is there still a floor?
Chris
There is a floor still, but the percentage of orders that take place in a pit electronically, it's about flipped. A very small transaction happen on the floor. No, it's definitely a shell of what it was.
Dustin
Chris, I got to ask because I have this image in my head. It's like burned into my head. Did you wear a funny jacket with numbers on it?
Chris
I did. The legend goes that we originally started wearing trading coats because at the beginning of time, smoking was allowed in the pit. Imagine that you're jammed in there, shoulder to shoulder, chest to back and people are smoking. Will the beautiful polyester coats would protect you from ashes? It was a way to identify your teammates because again imagine the footprint of a floor. It's a football field and you are flashing a sign language across that floor to your teammates. It's easiest to look for someone's hand that has the same brightly colored coat that yours does. Mine was for a couple of years, pink and green, which I have to say it was probably the only pink and green coat on the floor.
Dustin
You most certainly will have to submit a picture if you have it. Have you experienced anything else like that environment, a rock concert, a football game, anything like that?
Chris
I started very young and with no financial background, a very blue-collar family. It was my first exposure. I didn't know what a future was, what an option was, but I had a general sense of wonder and determination to figure it out. I've had that feeling, not often, but a handful of times through life where you go in and something is captivating, confusing, but you can figure it out and you get to it.
Dustin
I want to talk about the big pivot you made into the world that you're into now through Barre. Before that, I want to ask you this. When you said that you had come out, received treatment, you started doing things in a different way. You'd gone to work for a firm. I was curious, did you ever trade for yourself or ever think about that as a career path or did you get lured into this whole other world?
Chris
I did the trade for myself from 2009 until 2013. I was self-capitalized, a company of one. It was during the time that I was pregnant with both kids. In hindsight, I probably should have looked into life balance. I've explored different ways of looking at that career field, but ultimately decided it was time to move on to something different.
Dustin
Before we depart from here and get into your whole other world, any wisdom or advice, I know this is such a big general question, but those tuning in to the Get WealthFit show that have a desire to get into trading or futures or options. What is some advice that you can give to them to go explore that world?
Chris
There are two things. One thing that's been a huge life lesson for me is that there are some decisions that are your opportunity to make a decision is rather fleeting. You need to make a decision within a set amount of time or the opportunity will no longer be there. Gather the information that you have available and make the best possible decision that you can with that information and move on. If you're wrong, you're wrong. Own it, learn from it, and move on. That applies to trading. I had an interview where someone asked, “In your career, tell me about one time you failed.” I said, “My trading career, it was every day you failed.” Every day you made wrong decisions and you make the right decisions. You have to look at each failure as an opportunity to learn and get better. Those are gifts. The second thing would be to arm yourself. If you're looking to get into trading, you're looking to getting to any different field. There's a lot of education out there. Always be a student, utilize great resources like WealthFit, utilize LinkedIn learning, be a sponge. Call up someone that's in the field and say you'd like to learn more about what they do. Always be open to learning.
Dustin
A pivot in your career is you're stressed, you self-correct, you take things a little bit easy, but you also take a Barre class. I imagine that's part of the process. Forgive me, Chris, Barre is a form of ballet-inspired workouts?
Chris
It's nothing to do with drinking.
Dustin
I should have clarified that a lot earlier. Talk about how that was the shift for you. You got into this world and it was more than getting your mental health back. It led you into what you're doing now.
Chris
I grew up as a fat nerd, a total mathlete, not athletic at all to this day. If you throw a ball at me, it hits me in the face. Exercising for fun seemed totally foreign. Midway through my career, I started having a lot of back pain. That was a result of standing in one place all day long. I got into yoga initially and from there I started taking these Barre classes. What I enjoyed about the fitness studio, where I took my Barre classes was the community. At the time, the concept of boutique fitness was relatively new. For those who aren't in the fitness world, basically a long time ago, there were big box gyms and things called boutique fitness studios started to come on the scene. They were smaller facilities that they did one thing and they did it well. They had smaller enrollments. Therefore, created more of a community.
I found one that I loved. I loved the encouraging community. That being said, I have a monkey mind when it comes to numbers. I would sit there in the classes and doing my squats, my pulses and all that good stuff. I would think about the numbers of their business and think about ways that they could improve things. I threw out a couple of suggestions to the owners regarding starting programming that looked at a different demographic. They let me run with it. They owned a few franchise locations. I began working for a few of their locations. That being said, this was during the time that I was trading. There's an original side hustle.
The wonderful thing as a note, the wonderful thing about side hustles is it allows you to try something without having a fear of failure. When you have a job that is paying you money and you have insurance and all that good stuff, if you're able to squeeze out a little bit of time to try something new, it’s beneficial. It puts you at the advantage of you don't feel like it's your one and only and if you fail, it's catastrophic. I had been running marketing and retention strategies for a few of these fitness studios. I got intrigued by the software that many of the studios use. This one, in particular, is called mind-body. I went through the process to become a certified mind-body business consultant.
The software collects so much data about the users and using that data you can pretty much predict the next bend. You can influence the next bend. At the end of the day, whether you're selling Barre fitness or you're selling widgets on Amazon, data is this amazing tool that businesses can use, but only if they choose to use it. When I stepped away from trading in 2017, I brought more focus to my consultancy. I've been working with a couple of different boutique fitnesses by that point and helping the owners feel comfortable with the data and use it for their best advantage.
One thing of note is that many of the boutique fitness owners, at least the ones that I know are female. Women are plenty smart but can sometimes shy away from numbers. Male or female, whatever, anytime someone feels that they don't understand something, a lot of times they will avoid it. I wanted to be the one who was a partner to these businesses and help them have fun with their numbers, make it easy to digest and empower them to make better decisions for their business and ultimately make more money.
Dustin
Chris, I have so many directions I want to go to. I want to rewind a little bit. First thing, side hustle. There you are. You're in Barre class. I imagined somebody that has a skill set like yours, maybe they're an accountant, maybe they're good with numbers or maybe they're marketing, but they do it for some big corporation. They love Barre. They love yoga. They love whatever they're doing and they're like, “I wish I could monetize this or do a side hustle.” You're in this class. Did you go up to them? How did you approach these owners and say, “I can help you out?” What does that conversation look like? What's your advice for somebody that was in your shoes, similar to you that wants to try doing a side hustle like this?
Chris
It never hurts to ask. If you have something to offer, throw it out there. Let the world know about it. We're all so wrapped up in our own world. You assume that you're an accountant by day, marketing aficionado by night. People don't know that about you. Put it out there. It's not bragging. It's helpful. Don't be afraid to ask. You will get shut down. Failures happen. How many times are you going to fail? A lot. If someone shoots you down, if you want to get experience in that field, maybe put the money aside for a little bit. Think about creative ways that they could pay you so you can get a little bit of experience under your belt, and go from there or come up with ideas for you to split. Say that you were coming up with promotions or marketing plans that could have some revenue directly tied to it. Tell them, “I'd like to come up with this and I'd like X percentage of it. You guys have no outlay. It's no risk for you to take me on and try this out. If it works, I get a cut.”
Dustin
No risk to them. I'm curious to get into your brain a little bit more, Chris, I hope you don't mind. You're in that class. You're sitting there. You've been part of the community. What's that opportunity that you saw that you pitch them on?
Chris
At the time, they had very limited classes that were in the evening. They're in this specific location, their bread and butter client was the mom who I went to class, while their kids were at school. That being said, “You guys pay rent on this place 24 hours a day. I know there are people in this community who are not moms of young kids who want to work out at 9:30 AM.” I saw other opportunities. I said, “Why don't we start doing a series of nighttime events, pop up classes?” that bribed people. The first pushback was, “People will never come out at 7:00 at night. That is so late.” I said, “We have a sexy demographic here. Let's use that to go to area businesses, small businesses that want a little exposure to people like us and collaborate with them and say, ‘Is there anything that you can give to our evening event in January? We will use you on our marketing material and all that good stuff.’”
All of a sudden, the classes became very popular because it became, one, an opportunity to win free stuff. Everyone loves free stuff. Two, it became an opportunity to socialize and network authentically. Chances are if you're doing something during the day, you have your eye on the clock because after this 50-minute class or after whatever your task is during the day, you have something else that you're moving on to. If it's an evening class, people were a little more chill. They would stay afterward. They would connect with their classmates or the teachers and for fitness studios, in particular, the most important relationship is the peer-to-peer, not necessarily the instructor to the clients or the owner to the instructor. It's whether the people in the room like each other and whether they feel like they're part of a community. Everything you can do to foster that community and that's what we did through the evening classes. It leads to better retention. Those evening popups ultimately led to a full-thriving evening schedule where we didn't have to give stuff away for free.
Dustin
You can be observant like you were in this situation. You can test and you started to put together more people would like these classes at different times. There's that. A lot of people tuning in to the show, myself included, are more of that. You also had data on your side. I'm very curious. You can be observant and see opportunities, test it and get feedback, but also the numbers tell you things. A lot of times the business owner, the entrepreneur doesn't look at the numbers because they're more the creative or the builder. They love the craft of it. What did the numbers show you? What insights did you glean from looking at the data?
Chris
What was found was that the evening attendees, while they came less frequently because they were working long hours or because they were traveling for their job, they did not attend five mornings a week. When they were there, they had higher ancillary spend, meaning they bought more clothing. They were more likely to engage in one on one training sessions. It found that it was a different client and as valuable as the one who was there more frequently.
Dustin
When I was at a previous venture, we did seminars and what we found was we could always get more people at a nighttime seminar because people are getting off work. However, we would do fewer sales and during the daytime, we would have fewer people because a lot of people have less flexibility with their schedule. However, our dollars per head to those people, basically our revenue per person, there was a lot higher. It speaks to that, but we would have never known if we hadn't tracked which attendee went to which time. I find it very fascinating that it works the same way in this world as well.
Chris
The next step with the data is you have these fixed segments, certain groups of people that are going to behave and engage with your business in certain ways. The next step is altering your communications strategy and customizing it so that it speaks to each of them. For example, if you get a group that they are so loyal, they love your business, let's say they're not price sensitive, you don't necessarily want to shove sales down their throat. You can identify the people who only purchase when you're having the Black Friday specials. They're the ones who you're going to target those things to because you know it's a layup.
Dustin
Chris, you said having fun with numbers, you partner with people, you look for partners and you teach them how to have fun with the numbers. I can tell you I am not naturally a numbers guy and can relate to that business owner. How do you make numbers fun when people cringe at accounting, bookkeeping, or even taxes because they've maybe got unexpected bills and they lump that into the numbers category? How do you make it fun for business owners? How do you challenge entrepreneurs to take a hard look at the data?
Chris
Not all the data are going to be positive, not all is going to be negative. If possible, finding ways to hug, punch, hug, so it presents positive things. Run a report that would show some areas of growth and volley back to the more positive things. If you're able to run that thing, that's great. The other thing is some people need a little bit of help with executive functioning. They say, “I know that the software has a ton of data, but I don't even know what reports I should look at, what key numbers I should focus on and when should I focus on them? Should I run a retention report every week? Do I look at the numbers of my total membership number once a month or once a year? Putting together some template that fits their business size and their business goals helps take the anxiety out of the situation.
Dustin
There is no coverall blanket advice because every business is going to be different. Meaning some people might want to look at retention percentages, cost to acquire a customer and all the other metrics that are out there. Am I correct in that? Is it specific?
Chris
Absolutely. Some people are looking for sheer volume. They have a club that needs 5,000 numbers to turn. They need 5,000 bodies, where some people want to cultivate those long-term relationships and knowing that they're going to be more perhaps high-value relationships than sheer numbers. Every business is different.
Dustin
Is there a scenario where the numbers can lie, the numbers can mislead you or someone becomes so bogged down in numbers that they don't make the right decisions? Does anything come to mind when I asked that?
Chris
There's the phrase, “Analysis paralysis.” Going back to that advice of making the best decision that you have with the information in front of you but making a decision. If signs are pointing that you need to make a certain shift in your business, don't keep digging for data to prove that you're going to 100% be right. There's always going to be a chance that the decision you make is right or wrong. Use your data but that being said, make a decision. At the end of the day, some of it is going to have to go down to your gut feel and also your risk tolerance.
Dustin
Chris, do you think those that take more swings make more decisions even though they may be wrong? That is the better strategy versus delaying and holding off on a decision? Which camp would you fall into?
Chris
I would say that I am definitely a quicker decision person. If you put me up against someone who takes a long time but perhaps misses some opportunities, who's gotten farther on the race, I'm not sure. You need both in life much as the same as you need creatives and you need data junkies. If you only had one in the room, you wouldn't have a fully formed organization. You need to balance.
Dustin
I would say if it were me, I would take the mathlete because I got the other side covered, to use your words. Chris, this has been awesome. I want to ask you something you mentioned earlier, which is authentic. I heard you say it’s specifically authentic networking, not just networking. How do you define authentic networking?
Chris
My world’s worst nightmare is going into one of those events that's typically called a networking event and it's networking. Bring your business cards and the whole thing is slinging cards. I have found that everyone has a life that has twists and turns. When you get into a hard spot, your authentic group, your group of real friends, real supporters, they're going to be the ones that help you. Whether that is getting help for a health issue, looking for a new job or being a sounding board, are you going to call any of those people on the business cards for that? You’re probably not. Networking is a lifelong habit. It comes about by your authentic actions. It's the people that you meet in your neighborhood. They’re people that perhaps volunteer with on a board that you meet through your higher education. It's by being a decent human being and reaching out when you don't need anything.
I always think it's funny to see when someone starts spamming you on LinkedIn. You're like, “What do you want?” It's frustrating to have a relationship with an acquaintance or anyone who's always wanting, always offer to help people. It may not be the most monumental help especially if you're just getting started. You may not be able to open the door to new jobs or new connections, but you can offer to proofread a resume. You can offer to be a sounding board in negotiations. Always offer to help. I'm part of a wonderful networking group that we call ourselves the wellness posse. We meet for a workout class and coffee afterward. In the coffee, we go around and do what's new, either I need help or how can I help. You can keep people up to date on your career or life in general. Someone can say, “Do you know anyone in this space? Because I'm thinking about this.” It's karma. If you're someone who helps people out, they'll want to help you out in the future.
Dustin
I would love to come to join the wellness posse. I could borrow the name. Anything that is a posse sounds interesting in a tree to me. You've said before that you help people discover their potential through a thoughtful risk-taking. You have an amazing way of where it’s authentic networking as pointed out, thoughtful risk-taking. I've never heard that before. Obviously, we know what risk-taking is and you get the idea of what thoughtful is like. You put some thought behind it. What exactly though do you mean, Chris, when you say thoughtful risk-taking?
Chris
I believe I was introduced to the term when I became a volunteer with the Junior League of Chicago. The Junior League is a rather large international organization with local chapters. They teach again all female and they provide many opportunities for learning with an emphasis on volunteer work. What they stressed was that we provide you with a lot of opportunities to try something and realizing the worst-case scenario. What happens if you fail? That's something I ask myself all the time. If you want to try this new thing, what's the absolute worst thing that will happen if you fail? I have a bunch of little catchphrases. I always say that no one cares about you and how great is that. It's true. You think that the spotlight is on you all the time, but people are doing their own thing. If you're the accountant with the attention for marketing, you try to run a marketing business and don't get any clients for two years, no one's laughing at you, but you tried. That's thoughtful risk-taking is that you put together a plan. You think of the upside and the downside and you go for it.
Dustin
Moving from options world into Barre, into consulting businesses, I'm curious, what does surprise you? You had that twenty-year career as an options trader. You're now working, doing marketing plans for retention. I know numbers to you may seem similar, but I'm curious as to what has surprised you about moving over into the entrepreneurial world? What's something that you didn't know as a trader in your career now that you're in the entrepreneurial world? What is that?
Chris
One of the biggest things is making a career shift. I'm not alone in that. There are very few people who work with one company for 30 years and get their gold watch and all that good stuff. It’s okay to have some mixed feelings about switching jobs, switching careers, having swings and misses and big successes followed by big failures, but you need to keep moving forward. One of the interesting things going back to the intensive outpatient program, one thing that I noticed there, to be quite frank, I had some resistance going into the program. One of the fears was, who was going to be there? Is it going to be a whole who flew over the Cuckoo's nest group?
What I found was that the program was filled with people who were going through transitions and having a little bit of trouble adjusting to those transitions. There were quite a few people who were there because they were in deep struggles of depression or anxiety because their career path had come to an end. They didn't know what to do anymore because their whole identity was tied to their careers. We're not alone in constantly learning and constantly reinventing ourselves. That's probably my biggest takeaway is that we're all students.
Dustin
I'm with you on that, having made a big shift within a few years. I want to echo what you're saying on the other side of that is this whole new world of possibility and for some people, it could quite save their life. For you, you're an example of that. You did get help and you probably could have opted on as a trader for the rest of your career, but you found a new path, new challenges and new opportunities. Thank you for echoing that and bringing that to the table. I would love to know, Chris, what are you working on right now? What are you most excited about?
Chris
My baby is B.Well Consulting and that is my consultancy where I work with small business owners to help them realize their potential. A personal passion for it is content creation. That's what I'm excited about, creating blog posts, webinars and all that stuff and sharing that content. It's a great way to connect and help other people learn. In turn, when you put together that information, you are learning.
Dustin
We've said here on the show if you want to know something, teach it or write about it because it has you crystallize your ideas. Chris, I want to give you some extra love on the show and many people don't know this about the Get WealthFit show. Obviously, we're part of WealthFit.com and so how Chris came to the show was she wrote for us. You can do that on WealthFit and check under partner with us. You said, “Let's roll the dice. I want to be on the podcast.” I'll tell you we get a lot of requests to be on the podcast. When I said to you, “We're entertaining this. You've written for us. We already have a relationship, but I need to see some questions. Here's an example.” Within 24 hours, you had questions. I was blown away and I said, “That made the decision a lot easier.” That goes to show that you don't mess around for sure.
Chris
If you have an opportunity, go for it. If I had waited a week to run my questions past everyone to make sure they were perfectly worded and all that stuff, I would have missed the opportunity to go for it.
Dustin
People can do that as well. I'm sure that's going to blow us up some more. One of your lessons in the show was the sense of community. How do you foster that? It’s not about you, it's about the community. I learned and I immediately put it into practice. One of the things that people don't know about the WealthFit community is that you can write to us. You can be on the show. Chris, you're a shining example of that in the first I believe in accomplishing this, Mrs. Achiever. I wanted to give you some extra love there. For people that want to continue the conversation with you, they can visit you at BWellConsult.com, to work with you, consult with you, learn from you, perhaps have you create content for them. What else do you want people to know? Where else can they find you online?
Chris
I am heavily active on LinkedIn. Find me, I am Chris Beer and I'd love to connect with you. The more that we can learn from each other, the better.
Dustin
I love the attitude you bring. Thank you, Chris, for sharing your story, inspiring so many others, for helping us here at WealthFit get the message out and not podcast form but in written form and for what you're up to in the world. We appreciate you being on the show and be in such an inspiration.

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Go behind-the-scenes with real estate agent to the stars, Rod Watson. This former athlete shares his humble beginnings helping struggling families with short sales to now working with high-end clientele. Meet the L.A. VIP Agent and hear his personal branding secrets.

Connecting Extraordinary People With Extraordinary Lifestyles

Digital Nomad

Digital Nomad

How To Free Yourself From the Ordinary, Travel the World, and Make Money Online

Laura Petersen

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podcast
The Opt Out Life

Rethink success, reinvent rich and realize the life you want by "Opting Out." Listen in as Nate Broughton & Dana Robinson share how to create your own path in life.

The Opt Out Life

article
Business Valuation: How Much is Your Business Worth?

Learn how to value any small business using this simple formula that applies a business’s EBITDA to it’s industry multiple.

Business Valuation: How Much is Your Business Worth?

Nathan Wade

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podcast
Being Unemployable, YouTube Secrets & Automation Hacks

Renaissance man & Solopreneur, Michael O'Neal discusses lessons to be learned from good old-fashioned football, how to make money with Youtube & how to reclaim your freedom through automation.

Being Unemployable, YouTube Secrets & Automation Hacks

podcast
Opportunership, Ideating & Bacon Wrapped Businesses

Growth strategist, Brad Constanzo, serves up unique ideas for creating opportunities and discovering ways to add value... including a discussion of bacon-wrapped business ideas. What's better than bacon? Listen to find out!

Opportunership, Ideating & Bacon Wrapped Businesses

podcast
Intrapreneurship, Excellence & Innovation

Tap into the wisdom of multi-billion dollar companies and recent research in the fields of excellence & innovation, with José Pires.

Intrapreneurship, Excellence & Innovation

Personal Branding

Personal Branding

How To Create a Brand That Opens Big Doors, Attracts True Fans, and Makes Selling Easy

Michelle Villalobos

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Product Branding

Product Branding

How To Create a Product Everyone Knows, Likes, Trusts … and Buys From

Rick Cesari

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Credit Secrets for Entrepreneurs

Credit Secrets for Entrepreneurs

How To Use Business & Personal Credit To Launch Your Startup

Gerri Detweiler

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podcast
Feeling Invincible, Marketing Martha Stewart & Dropping 76 Pounds!

Once Sayan Sarkar finally quit his full-time job, his side hustle business took off and generated 10x the amount of money he was making at his office job. He shares tips and tricks to how he was able to make this happen.

Feeling Invincible, Marketing Martha Stewart & Dropping 76 Pounds!

podcast
Born To Sell, Tripling Revenue & the Silver Tsunami

Are you investing in home care marketing? In this episode, The Hurricane explains why this industry is worth your hard-earned money.

Born To Sell, Tripling Revenue & the Silver Tsunami

Joint Venture Marketing

Joint Venture Marketing

How To Boost Your Sales Through Strategic, Low-Cost Marketing Partnerships

Ridgely Goldsborough

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podcast
Conquering Cancer, Making Movies & Selling Businesses

This Cancerpreneur didn’t let the bad news of illness get in the way of his entrepreneurial spirit and positive mindset.

Conquering Cancer, Making Movies & Selling Businesses

Free PR

Free PR

The Hustler's Guide To Capturing Media Attention & Getting Eyeballs on Your Brand

Nicole Dunn

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Persuasive Copywriting

Persuasive Copywriting

How To Write Words That Capture Attention, Create Desire, & Sell Your Product Like Crazy

Mara Glazer

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article
How To Build Your Business Credit Score — To Get Loans & Low Interest Rates

Learn how to build your business credit score so you can get access to business loans and credit cards with low interest rates.

How To Build Your Business Credit Score — To Get Loans & Low Interest Rates

Michelle Black

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article
Do You Have What It Takes To Be An Entrepreneur?

In her new book “Women with Money,” Jean Chatzky gives us the top 5 traits of successful entrepreneurs. [Excerpt]

Do You Have What It Takes To Be An Entrepreneur?

Jean Chatzky

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Idea To Income

Idea To Income

How To Start a Company and Turn Your Entrepreneurial Dreams into Reality

Didi Wong

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article
How to Fund Your Business with Government Grants

Who doesn't want cash from their favorite Uncle Sam? Here's how you can find grants and fund your business with free government money.

How to Fund Your Business with Government Grants

Ian Chandler

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article
How Much Do You REALLY Need to Start a Business? The Answer is Less Than You Think.

Think starting a business takes TONS of money? It doesn’t have to. Here’s how you can build your empire without breaking the bank.

How Much Do You REALLY Need to Start a Business? The Answer is Less Than You Think.

Jon Westenberg

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article
Bootstrap Your Startup & Kickstart Your Success

Launching a startup without investors may seem like a one-way ticket to failure—but it’s one of the best ways to kickstart your business.

Bootstrap Your Startup & Kickstart Your Success

Ian Chandler

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article
How to Lead Employees to Greatness: Your (Hormonal) Strategy for Success

Consider and stimulate (the right) hormones for your team. Embrace leadership tactics that foster healthy hormonal teams.

How to Lead Employees to Greatness: Your (Hormonal) Strategy for Success

Jill Huettich

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