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Craig P. Stone: Selling Knives, Developing Real Estate And Producing Movies

We are talking to a renaissance man, Craig P. Stone. If you're getting to know him, you should know that he's a successful investor that has created, executed and delivered results in many different businesses.

He started off selling cutlery, selling knives, forks and spoons at the age of sixteen door-to-door. After graduating college, he worked on Wall Street as an investment banker and did a little real estate investing on the side. After that, he took over a failing business with over 122 employees, turned it around and sold it for a profit. He got into real estate development by buying a group of buildings, which he put together and bought the air rights.

He tore them all down and co-developed a 22-story, 97-unit residential building and a 33-story mixed-use hotel with 203 units in Manhattan. This is a very interesting and powerful episode. I want to give you a heads up that this is rapid fire. Craig has been at this for a long time and gives us a lot of insights.

We talked about selling knives, other fine cutlery, producing movies, real estate investing, developing future plans, business turnarounds and a whole lot more. If you are ready to be entertained and yet educated at the same time with a touch of motivation, then you are going to love the show. With that said, let's get to it.

Craig
Craig, you left Wall Street and decided to go out on your own creating seven companies in different industries such as telecommunications, internet finance, real estate development, producing movies, TV, private equity and investment banking. One might think it's easier to stay in one, maybe two industries. Why have you gotten into so many different industries?
First and foremost, the question is, would anyone hire me? The actual thing was I decided after leaving Wall Street and working for an incredible person that I wanted to pursue my passion. I believe passion will allow you to accomplish anything. Even not knowing what you want to do, if you believe you can achieve anything, the subconscious, which controls 95% of what we do will allow you to overcome challenges and attain any goal you want.
Dustin
You know that you can achieve anything. Knowing that, does it make you antsy? Where you've had success in a certain industry or field and you want to go into another thing? Is it a sign of maybe antsiness? What is it for you that makes you want to go tackle a whole other thing?
Craig
It's the opposite because if you're finishing one thing, you set that vision, you created, executed, delivered a result, sold the company or whenever you've done, it's like you're taking off again. You're being born again. It's the most wonderful feeling to say, "What do I want to do next? What am I curious about? What is a void in the market place?" It's never been about being antsy or being fearful. It's that excitement. It's that thing of here's the challenge. How are we going to execute it? Who are the people we're going to bring in? I must tell your audience to please go out there and try things that you never thought possible because you can do the impossible. You can see the invisible becomes visible and the impossible becomes possible.
Dustin
I have major life incidents. I could use some clarity. I know people benefit from this as well. How do you know when it is the end of something? Is it a feeling or for you is it that you've set a goal, you've reached it and it's time to move on?
Craig
If someone makes me an offer in a company, that's the first sign. The second sign is, are you getting to a point where you feel that you've taken it to a certain level? If it's not partnering with another company or not, then it's time to move on to the next thing. You can feel it. It's in your gut. I'm very much involved in neurology and how the mind works. When you get that feeling, it's time to move on. It never lets me down.
Dustin
There's one thing to have this belief that anything is possible, that you can achieve anything. Looking at your career, looking at your path in life, all the different fields that you've been a part of, to me it looks like it requires different skill sets. Picking up and having to learn something new, whether it's acting, producing movies or finance, which isn't my strength, how have you been able to pick up new skill sets across such a diverse range?
Craig
It's a great question for you, entrepreneurs. You people are going to start a company. You have people that are going to invest with a group. Let’s say you're a venture capital group and you're going to invest in something. The one thing that I've learned and write this down is the first four people that you hire are going to make or break your success. You look for people that have other skill sets than you. Everybody that I've hired, which is probably over 1,000 people have been smarter than me. I don't say that in a joking way or in a pretentious way. The reality is you have to bring in great people to offset and to bring added value to your supposed value added to make the company work. The skill sets then are brought in. I start to learn a little bit. The point is one and one is three.
Dustin
I want to dive into this because of a lot of adventures, at least very early on that I've been a part of, it's always been what they call out in the world, the friends and family plan. Are you saying maybe don't do the friends and family plan?
Craig
I'm against the friends and family plan. First and foremost, I don't want to get into a situation where “Dad, guess what,” my belief is if you have the right passion, you can do anything. It's been proven by a Harvard study where actual venture capitalist went to Harvard and there were people pitching to them. At the end of the pitching session, they went over to the different VCs and asked them, what was it that made you pick 2, 27, 38 and 144? They said it wasn't the actual product, it wasn't the actual service, it was passion. They felt it in their core, in their bones. They believed in that person. When you go out there to raise money and you can raise money, this is the most exciting time to go out there, get charged up. If you have something that you believe in and you could articulate that narrative with information, with inspiration and with entertainment, you're going to get your audience to take action.
Dustin
I can feel your passion. It's an energy to feed off of, it’s exciting.
Craig
Energies are a powerful thing. If we can bring energy, it's incredible how people react because most of the world are followers. They're not sure. People can come in and bring any product. We have to be honest with each other. We've learned for a lot of things that have happened in Silicon Valley that they brought the energy and the excitement in and put all these crazy futuristic projections, stayed private and people invested in them. They invested in energy. They invested in passion. They invested in the excitement. They invested in the belief. They invested in certainty, but they had none of that. We could look at the example of the Theranos issue. Whether it goes one way or another, Elizabeth Holmes was able to bring in some incredible people to a company with her energy and her passion. She was able to raise $900 million.
Dustin
I want to go back. Rumor has it that you started your career selling knives. Do you think that's important for every entrepreneur to have a path through selling door-to-door?
Craig
We're not selling knives because we don't want people going out there killing people. The issue that was very interesting was it taught me one thing. I don't believe in the word sales. I believe in the word people buy. You have a different narrative when you're doing that. When you're prepared, you get confident, which get results. The point is that you want that person to buy. How do you make them buy, with information and with a technique that allows you to separate yourself from the competitors? At sixteen years old, I started out not doing very well. One day I walked in with some pots, pans and they fell over. I realized nothing broke when they fell down. I said, "This is cool."
Every time I would knock on the door, I would fall down and make a fool of myself. Obviously, people felt sorry so they love the pots and pans. I found out through a friend that they had a penny and a scissor. That scissor could cut the penny. If I could get anybody, a child, to come in and cut that penny, I had a sale. I had a sale of pots and pans. I had a sale of these scissors. I had such success at that time because nobody else in the company was looking to do anything different or thinking outside of the box. That's the key to moving forward. Get out of your comfort zone. Don't be afraid of what other people think. Go in there and make a fool of yourself. Who cares? There's a great book by Richard Feynman, the great Nobel Prize winner, What Do You Care What Other People Think? It's a great start for anybody to overcome that fear, overcome that, "What's going to happen?"
Dustin
You started a lot of businesses. You coach a lot of people that are in business or at least high-level corporate careers. What do you think is important to know or understand when you're about to start a business?
Craig
When you're about to start a business, the key thing is to know where you want to go, what is the goal, and then backtrack from there. If you don't know where you want to go, all paths lead to nowhere.
Dustin
I want to go further on that. The idea is, “I don't like where I'm at. I'm stuck in Corporate America. I want to start a business. I'm passionate about cupcakes. I want to go out there and make enough money to replace my income.” Is that the clarity you're talking about or do I need to have a grand vision like, “I'm franchising this thing and we're going to be in 37 cities across America?” How do you know if your vision is big enough?
Craig
Let's look at a couple of things. You make some great points. Number one, first and foremost, you want to stay in your job. You're working most jobs from 9:00 to 5:00, 8:00 to 6:00 but you have from 6:00 to 12:00 to start doing something. There's a time you can start figuring out what you want to do. You don't want to get grandiose. You don't want to get big. We all want to remember we crawl then we walk then we run. Building a building, you want to do brick by brick. You want to figure out, “If this is my goal, why is that cupcake going to be different? What's the difference between this cupcake that we're trying to sell in the future and another cupcake?" Is it because people love cupcakes with fillings or do people love cupcakes where they can draw on them?
It's something unique. It has to fill a void. If you can figure that out and then come back and say, "We're going to start the cupcake. We're going to start small. We're going to start maybe on the street." Look at Kenneth Cole selling shoes out of his car. You start small and see what's going to happen. See how people react and get their feedback, "What did you think about this?" From that feedback, then you start to incorporate that into how you might change the direction of what you want to do with that cupcake. Suddenly, you decide, "If everybody buys a cupcake, we're going to have a prize where the one that bites the 10,000th cupcake wins a cruise or wherever that might be. There has to be something different.
Dustin
We talked a little bit about real estate. My understanding is when you were on Wall Street, you were also doing real estate investing on the side and you would go on to develop. I'm always fascinated by the first deal. Take us back to the first deal that you did.
Craig
Let me answer this first for all your real estate investors. Real estate has been the one business that I've always made money in. My colleagues have always made money in. It's an incredible thing when you can put up $0.10 and leverage the rest of that. Any real estate we bought that we knew we could sell it for a penny more the next day. Ironically, I had a bad situation happen on the first deal because a gentleman came into the office in a pair of shorts, sneakers and didn't look very wealthy at all so nobody wanted to deal with him. I walked over and introduced myself and to make a long story short, it was somebody that I ended up doing a real estate deal with making six figures up. That was not a good thing because that didn't happen every time after that, but it was the first thing that happened. I realized, "If you can be as naive as I am and not even understand this business and be able to do this thing." What resonated was about relationships. This is the key thing about doing anything certainly in the real estate business.
Dustin
I got the timeline right, Craig, and I want to ask you why. The timeline is in my head. You're on Wall Street. You're on the side. You're doing real estate deals. You've got one way of investing and making money. Why did you say I'm going to do real estate over here versus picking stocks or other forms of investments?
Craig
Curiosity is an incredible thing that we have. I got interested in why people were able to make all sorts of money. I started calling the FDIC, the RTC in those days and different banks introducing myself. I had no background. I had done nothing. Suddenly after making perhaps 200 calls, it's not something where you're going to make five calls or ten calls. A bank would say, "We've got a hundred units we want to get rid of. We don't want to be in America anymore. Would you be interested in and trying to work something out?"
It was like, "This is too good to be true." Things were happening like that. The Wall Street thing allowed me to have a little credibility, I had no background but what was I doing? I was doing something proactive. I was doing something to go out there and introduce myself. I was going out there with some narrative. I was going out there with a mission. I was going out there with a commitment. I believed in my heart of hearts and I say this to your audience that it's about certainty. If you believe somehow you're going to make something happen, it happens.
Dustin
You would go on to develop real estate. Would you do smaller deals as well throughout your career or did you switch entirely over to development?
Craig
I switched over to development not knowing anything about it. Real estate people can develop anything. I was able to put together two projects. One was assembling a bunch of buildings to be a 22-story, 97-unit project. Another one was 33-story, 203-mixed-use thing. I must tell your audience again, you don't have to be a rocket scientist. We all have the capability to do anything by jumping in as Mark Burnett, the great producer always say, "Take a shot and go in there.” If you get a contract, you get it for a long period of time, if you can. You have the ability to put things together. It's a very exciting thing. I do believe in continuing to do this. Anything that brings in any revenue, you meet people and through that other things can happen.
Dustin
You took over a failing business with 122 employees. You turned it around and you sold it for the profit. I want to know what the story is. What was the business and how did you turn a failing business around?
Craig
By being naive and somewhat ignorant, you can do incredible things. In that case, the person that had headed it was not in great communication with the employees and never cared about the employees. I've always believed in teamwork. I've always believed in people. I've always believed in win-win. In that context, we sat down and we decided we were going to give each of these people a little piece of the company. In that capacity, the one thing led to another. We were able to turn it around. It was a telecommunications company. I knew nothing about it. I brought some people in that knew a lot about it. Here's another example of bringing in some smart people. I listened and we moved forward. That was a real estate telecommunications deal. It was quite a bit of real estate. I must thank my employees at that time, the wonderful people that joined in and the effort. It comes down to hard work. It was a great and wonderful feeling afterwards.
Dustin
A lot of people find failing businesses and they're able to turn it around and make money. What did you see that you said, “I’ve got to get into this?”
Craig
I saw a management that was not doing a great job. It’s not that I thought I could do a great job, but I thought I could do a better job. I thought with the right contacts that I had, we could do something special. It was not dissimilar from buying real estate and knowing you could sell it for a penny more. I knew if we got it, we would be able to sell it. It did happen. It was a team effort. Nothing I've ever done has been myself. It's always been with great people around me.
Dustin
You've done a lot of deals in your life, real estate, business deals and movie deals, is there a commonality in the way in which you look at it?
Craig
If you're looking to vet certain deal, I'm a big fan of Tim Draper and some of these VCs, who worked on instinct, who worked on the feel and went in there. That's how I work. I might bring colleagues in who vets up and want to look at every number and so forth. I see something, I feel something and go for it. I don't know if that's good. I don't know if that's bad. The advice is free to do your audience. I can't say it's perfect, but that's how I do it.
Dustin
Let's talk about TV and movies. You were co-producer on an award-winning documentary for those that are interested to know the title "At the Edge of the World." You have all this success in business and in the investment world, why go over here and get into movies? What attracted you?
Craig
I'll ask you this, who isn't excited about Hollywood? Hollywood to me as a young boy and growing up I thought, "It's incredible." I said, "Why can't we get in there?" That's how naive it was. There was this opportunity, At The Edge Of The World was a movie about what was going on in Japanese whaling in Antarctica. The mantra was, “What would you risk your life for?” Two boats were sent up there. If you go to www.AtTheEdgeoftheWorld.com, there's a two-minute trailer your audience might enjoy. We get nothing from it so you could enjoy it. It was people going out and were seeing their lives for something other than themselves. That's what initially drew me to Hollywood. Going there, it wasn't like we walked in and everybody wanted to see us. We probably talked to every studio and every independent and so on and so forth. That's how it happens in life.
You go out there and if it's not 200, it's 201. If it's not 500, it's 501. That led to a show called the Whale Wars on Animal Planet, which led to another documentary The World Away. It was very exciting about NASA and the German scientists in the Holocaust had been brought over, which killed a lot of people over in Germany. NASA was very helpful in that. Also as a consultant on a show called Knight School with the Great Coach Bobby Knight. It was a reality show on ESPN at the time. It got the highest ratings. We were extraordinarily excited. That was again the teamwork of 75 people and people that care to get a result. It's never been for me about the win. It's about working together, doing the best that you can, challenging yourself, keeping yourself moving forward. That's all you can control.
Dustin
Your ability to jump in, brave forward essentially and learn along the way is admirable. There's a voice in the back of my head that says, "Has Craig ever jumped in and been overwhelmed or has he ever found himself like, I wish I had packed a parachute or maybe I shouldn't have entered into this? Have you ever found yourself in that situation?
Craig
In more times than I can tell you.
Dustin
What do you do? How do you keep cool?
Craig
I believe it's 10% how you react and 90% you work on a solution. There've been times when we've been so underwater on things. The whole thing about it is to figure out what do we do to change this, to put the Band-Aids on the boat when it's leaking. It's all about emotion. It's all about controlling emotion. It's all about working as a team. It's all about having the spirit and the belief that you can do it even though it may not be a total failure. Failure is the best thing that happened to me because it gave me one thing I revere most as a characteristic, which is humility. It taught me a lot. It taught me at a time maybe when things were going well. You can jump into some things that are not going to go so well. People are going to say certain things. That's when you find what you're about. That's when you go all the way down. You grow taller than you ever thought and stronger than you ever thought you'd be.
Dustin
You're a CEO, you've been one for quite a while, yet you decided to become a performance coach and help others. I find it interesting because most CEOs have coaches, but generally, they're not like a coach to outside people, maybe people inside their company executives. Why with so much going on in your world do you take on wanting to mentor or coach others?
Craig
I started being a coach in 1999. I realized that I was a little bit lucky in life because I had a performance coach years ago. He is no longer with us, but he changed my life. He tweaked me. He allowed me to understand how to get my narrative across, how to deal with people, how to build up a Rolodex, how to keep relationships. It was all about giving something back where somebody who, for instance, couldn't speak for twenty seconds before they went on the stage to pitch to a VC, can raise $100 million a few months later. It's not because I'm great, but we worked as a team. It's going into the entertainment area where I'm working with entertainers. I'm going to take it into the athletic arena, where obviously the athlete is using a performance coach.
Not only from when they're in the professional leagues but also when they're coming out of college and transitioning in. I'm helping them with their wealth management and their real estate and decisions. Not in doing contracts, but taking them through the whole process and knowing they have a mentor, a coach and a teacher. That's what it's all about. If you look at the end of the day of how many NBA basketball players or how many NFL football players are broke in four or five years, it's unacceptable. That's what drove me into the performance coaching area and into even the corporate executive area, where many people weren't able to fulfill their potential so that was the catalyst to that.
Dustin
What surprised you in coaching, maybe something that you didn't know when you first started?
Craig
The biggest things are the lack of belief. Even very high executives, people you revere or know had in themselves. They had ridden out a wave, but they hadn't learned the nuances to make them comfortable. They truly didn't have a belief in themselves. We as people have to believe in who we are. To do that, we have to be prepared. If we're prepared, we become confident. When we become confident, we can do anything. To address that question, the lack of belief in their abilities to move their companies forward, to overcome the challenges and to achieve goals. I continue to work with people over the years. It's been an extraordinary experience and I love doing it.
Dustin
You say that lack of belief, what occurs for me is they say, "Fake it until you make it," or impostor syndrome. There's something to be said for, "I'm in a new territory or I'm in an environment that I've never been before and yet I need to produce." Are you more surprised about the lack of belief in themselves or other factors?
Craig
"Fake it until you make it" is something that is a great Silicon Valley terminology. I'm not in the "fake it until you make it" business. I am in the business of making people know that they can do anything that they want to do. You don't have to be the brightest bulb in the world, but you can achieve professionally and personally anything you want. What does that do? It gives you peace of mind. If you have a professional and personal balance in your life, you have peace of mind. If one is higher than the other, you're not going to be happy. The key thing is finding that balance.
Dustin
You are on record for saying life begins at the end of your comfort zone. I believe people get that. I'd like to hear your explanation of being in your comfort zone.
Craig
Anytime you can push yourself outside of your comfort zone, you grow. What is the antonym for fear? It's curiosity. The point is if we face our fears, we're going to grow. If we stay where we are in inertia, we will never be happy. It's one of the things that happen over and over again when people look back. If you're afraid of heights, which I was, go out on a plane and parachute. You’ll feel better. You’ feel stronger. That's been a thing for me. I had a lot of challenges to overcome, things I was afraid of, things I was fearful of, but we can do things.
With the mind, you can do things through what they call reverse engineering. In general, in a fundamental sense, we have to face our fears. We can overcome them. Even if somebody meets with somebody that they respect in the performance coaching area, for instance, they'll feel different. We just need a little push to do that. I'm a big believer that by going out of that comfort zone, we grow to another level. It's the most wonderful thing to overcome something, whether it's a spider, whether it's jumping out of a plane, whether it's giving a public speech.
Dustin
I thought I read that one of your clients was a top poker player in the world. Is that what you helped them with?
Craig
There was a gentleman by the name of Phil Hellmuth. He was in my view, one of the greatest poker players ever. Phil and I had a chance to get to know each other. This was not done in any performance coaching area. We decided together to make a long story short to become partners. In 2003, we managed the top 100 poker players in the world with their different ventures and so forth. I'll share a story that I haven't shared. Phil said, "If we're going to be partners, you've got to show me something." It was something that related to life. He said, "We're going to stay up as long as we can. If you can stay up longer than I can at night, whenever it may be, then we have a deal."
We went out to my house on Long Island and swam. We went into the city, to the theater. We went to all different things in New York. At the end of the day, I was able to outlast Phil as he fell asleep. This is a great analogy for life. We have to be willing to do more than the norm. We have to be willing to go out there and do the extra thing. H.L. Hunt had said, "There were only three requirements for success. The first one is to decide exactly what it is you want in life. The second was to determine the price that you're going to have to pay to get the things you want. The third was resolve to pay that price." In that context, the thing with Phil and with my life moving forward, before and after are similar.
Dustin
I believe it will move a lot of people. What I took away was Phil's test of you. Testing people and he tested you, I could benefit from that and so many others. What are you working on now? What’s got you most excited?
Craig
What I'm excited about on the entrepreneurial side, I run a company that's involved in banking, private equity and real estate. There's an interesting play out there for a lot of your audience. You may already know about it but it's the cannabis platform. It's a real game-changer, when you have nine states that have recreational marijuana. We have 30 states with medical marijuana and the CBD is different than the THC. It's amazing what that has done. It was amazing what it has done for people close to me. For many, it brought the opioid use down 20% to 25%. It's increased tax revenues. I would say to your audience, take a good look at the cannabis platform.
You have John Boehner over at Acreage Holdings, our ex-Speaker of the House. You have some of the great names that are involved. It's a very funky market. It's hard to raise money in this state. They go to Canada. What I would tell you is I truly believe that this is a unique opportunity. GW Pharmaceuticals out of London got approval by the FDA for epilepsy drug. It's a very exciting area. Another area that I'm very excited and involved with is the pharma area of biology and biotech. There are exciting things happening. People are buying other companies, ways to buy companies and be bought over. It's a very exciting area. Those are two that I would say your audience may like and certainly the real estate tech area. There is some interesting place there. Look at management, look what they're doing, look at how they differ from other places.
We don't need a broker to show a house anymore. A robot can answer any questions. Where's the bathroom? How big is the house? This is where AI, Artificial Intelligence, is going to come in. It's going to change things. The only thing that artificial intelligence versus us as humans can't do is critical and strategic thinking. It also can't talk about emotions. For instance, you wouldn't want a robot coming out and saying, "I'm sorry to say you have cancer." This is not going to work. There’s a lot of place with some artificial intelligence. I would suggest, get on and look for people that are doing things, get in touch with people. One thing I like about you, Dustin, you're always talking about how do I build the Rolodex? How do I do that? That's an important aspect of what one does is to continue to build that Rolodex.
Dustin
Craig, thanks for the wisdom. I want to go to WealthFit round, which is my fancy name for rapid fire questions. What’s the best investment you have?
Craig
The real estate development in Manhattan.
Dustin
What’s the investment you don’t want to talk about?
Craig
Internet finance investment that we made that we couldn't solve. It made a lot of money. It didn't work out that way.
Dustin
When you're not making investments that don't work out the way that you want them to and life is good, what's your guilty pleasure spend? What do you splurge on?
Craig
I'm not big on splurger. I enjoy the simple things in life. I have two children and spending time with them. I don't believe in material things. I believe in contributing to the destitute. We have 23,000 children homeless in New York City, for instance. I believe in trying to share the wealth and your time with them.
Dustin
What scares you?
Craig
The only thing that scares me is if anything happened to my two children. That's my only fear.
Dustin
What routines do you have or rituals?
Craig
A ritual of getting up in the morning, not necessarily at the same time because I believe the body needs a certain amount of rest and rest is key. I get up. I have a glass of water. I run on the beach. We know the beach is very meditative in its context of relaxing you. I come back, have a glass of water. I meditate right after that. I meditate three times a day. I've found that most of my colleagues and people that are successful meditate. I have a cup of coffee, an English muffin. I feel so lucky. I want to say one quick thing, if you're overwhelmed, you're upset, you're afraid and you're feeling down, think about some of our people that are in Afghanistan fighting for us and then your life. It’s pretty hard to be that upset, that down and that afraid.
Dustin
I imagine you've had a lot of mentors and I'm curious to know who they are and how do you get better as a person?
Craig
I have some great mentors in Wall Street. It was a gentleman by the name of Michael Milken. In real estate, a great mentor to me, a gentleman by the name of Harry Helmsley, who helped me. There have been lesser names that have always been there to teach, coach and mentor me. I get better by doing things for people. I have a quote that in my mind, which is, "We have to be ashamed to die until you've scored a victory for humanity.” We're on this Earth for a short period of time. By doing good, you do well. I feel I get better that if each and every day, I can do something for someone and expect nothing in return, I'm doing better. I'm growing. Whether it's God, universe or energy, I'm moving forward as a better person. We all will move forward if we help others and we look out for our fellow human beings.
Dustin
I want to thank you big time for coming on the show and sharing with us. I know you've touched, moved and inspired myself. I can't wait for others to hear this message as well. For folks that want to continue the conversation, where is the best place for them to do that?
Craig
They can come to CraigPStoneCoaching.com. There's also an email there. You're welcome to email me. I try to get back to anybody if you have a question. The advice is free so I can't promise you anything. I would suggest and I'm going to say a final word, it's not the odds that kill us, but the spirit that dies if we're not able to fight those odds, so go for it. Go for it and if you need anything, I'm always there for you.
Dustin
I appreciate you being on the show.
Craig
It’s been an absolute pleasure and congratulations to all your success.

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Each year, the country’s top investing and money-minded individuals gather at the Berkshire Hathaway Annual Meeting. Get insight into this exclusive event with Dustin's major takeaways.

4 Interesting Takeaways from the Berkshire Hathaway Annual Meeting

article
The Simple Guide To REITs: How To Invest In Real Estate With Less Risk & Regular Returns

Thinking about investing in a Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT)? Learn what they are, how they work, and how to pick the best one for you.

The Simple Guide To REITs: How To Invest In Real Estate With Less Risk & Regular Returns

Abhi Golhar

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article
How To Take Investing Seriously & Stop Playing With Your Money

Don McDonald dispels the most common myths about investing and lays out a strategy for a balanced portfolio and consistent returns.

How To Take Investing Seriously & Stop Playing With Your Money

Don McDonald

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podcast
How To Invest In Apartment Buildings

Michael Becker of SPI Advisory, on apartment building investing: how to find properties, make deals, and create passive income from rent.

How To Invest In Apartment Buildings

podcast
House Hacking & Living Rent-Free

How to hack the housing market with John Hagen. Learn how to buy houses and have tenants pay your mortgage.

House Hacking & Living Rent-Free

Creative Real Estate Investing Showcase

Creative Real Estate Investing Showcase

Behind-the-Scenes on 3 Unique Investment Deals

WealthFit Trainers

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Private Lending Showcase

Private Lending Showcase

Behind-the-Scenes on 4 Successful Real Estate Loans

WealthFit Trainers

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Real Estate Wholesale Showcase

Real Estate Wholesale Showcase

Behind-the-Scenes on 2 Successful Wholesale Deals

WealthFit Trainers

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Real Estate Fix & Flip Showcase

Real Estate Fix & Flip Showcase

Behind-the-Scenes on 13 Successful Rehab Projects

WealthFit Trainers

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The 7-Figure Landlord

The 7-Figure Landlord

3 Keys to Building A Portfolio of 500+ Cash Flow Properties

Gregg Cohen

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Facebook Messenger Marketing

Facebook Messenger Marketing

How To Find Your Next Great Investment Property on Big Blue

Bob McIntosh

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Facebook Live Marketing

Facebook Live Marketing

How to Exponentially Increase Your Number of Leads Using Facebook Live

Bob McIntosh

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podcast
Secrets of a "Financial Concierge"

Anything can happen in the world of finance. Travis Jennings teaches you to use the tools at your disposal to make (and keep) your fortune.

Secrets of a "Financial Concierge"

article
What's the Difference Between Naked Options & Covered Options?

What are the differences between naked and covered options? If you're an investor, you need to know how to use either (or both) correctly.

What's the Difference Between Naked Options & Covered Options?

Justin McCormick

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article
The Short & Simple Guide to Employee Stock Options

What are employee stock options and how do you use them? It's simpler than you might think.

The Short & Simple Guide to Employee Stock Options

Lance Cothern

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podcast
Cryptocurrency 101

A fool and his money are soon parted. Wanna trade cryptocurrency? Don't jump in without understanding the tech, and trading fundamentals.

Cryptocurrency 101

article
From Zero to Hero: Get a Financial Education & Start Investing Right

You don’t have money—yet. Learn how to begin businesses, invest in real estate, and make your start in the stock market from scratch.

From Zero to Hero: Get a Financial Education & Start Investing Right

Andy Tanner

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article
The Difference Between Options & Stocks

Learn the difference between options and stocks. One is a full-time job, the other is a long-term investment.

The Difference Between Options & Stocks

Justin McCormick

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article
How to Make Money Using the 5 Profit Centers of Rental Properties

Want to invest in real estate? Here are the 5 biggest things you need to consider before investing in property.

How to Make Money Using the 5 Profit Centers of Rental Properties

Ali Boone

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article
7 Real Estate Investing Shortcuts: How to Get Started with Less Upfront Cash

Any cash you put in a real estate investment is cash you can’t use elsewhere. Here are 7 ideas to get that upfront cash as low as possible.

7 Real Estate Investing Shortcuts: How to Get Started with Less Upfront Cash

Justin McCormick

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Real Estate Investing 101

Real Estate Investing 101

The Guide to Your First Investment Deal

Elisa Stabile

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