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An Unusual Way To Wealth with Dustin Mathews

This is a very special episode. This is Nathan Wade. I'm the Managing Editor here at WealthFit.


For this episode, I'm going to interview our host, Dustin Mathews, and find out a little bit more about him. We thought you would get to know the host a little bit better and hear the interesting story that he has.

We talk about a lot of great stuff in this episode. We talk about what Rastafarianism, football and selling on eBay have in common. Those are three different parts of Dustin's story early on. We talk about how to know when you're in the dip and when you should quit and move on from the business you started. We go over some amazing tips for public speaking, giving presentations, marketing in general and building relationships.

I hope you get a lot out of this podcast. I know I did.

Nathan
This is an honor and a pleasure to have you on. It's turning the tables on you here. Normally, you're the host and you're asking other people very interesting questions, digging deep into their lives. This time we get to dig deep into yours. You're a bestselling author, a serial entrepreneur and you're the Chief Wealth Evangelist here at WealthFit. Before we dig into the professional stuff, I have a strange question. This is what I've learned from my research into your life. In high school, you were both almost a Rastafarian and you were the starting safety for the varsity football team. What did those two things have in common?
Dustin
I want to let people know I appreciate you doing the show. Nathan, who is interviewing me, is our Chief Editor at WealthFit. All the awesome articles and content that comes out is under your watchful eye. I wanted to give folks context like, “Who is this different voice now?” That's Nathan. We hung out in Orlando and got to know each other. I asked him to do the interview because he knows how to tell a story. Back to your question. Growing up, all my friends around me were very into music. They were musicians and they studied it like art. For me, I played instruments but not anything cool. I played the clarinet and to make it cool, I started to play the bass clarinet because I thought that looks like a saxophone. All my friends were into music and they all had a genre, like rock and punk. Dustin didn't have one. I was an easy-going guy and still am. I became fascinated with reggae. I ended up buying every Bob Marley album there was to own and memorizing all the songs. If you asked me now, I couldn't tell you what song and what album, but in that time, I was like, “I'm going to own reggae. That's going to be my niche.” Along with listening to reggae music, you want to become a Rastafarian or maybe I did. I identified with that and rebelling as a young one. It made sense.
That's where the Rastafarianism wannabe comes. I did want to grow dreadlocks. However, every time that my mother's birthday or a holiday or something where you get a gift for your mother, she would say to me once I was in this phase, “Dustin, I don't want anything. I just want you to cut your hair.” I could never get it long enough. I never made it more than a couple months. I was doing soap and all the crazy stuff you do to get dreadlocks. That was my whole Rastafarian venture there. Strong safety, I'm a tennis guy. I love sports and my friend, Mike, who I suspect you've talked to got me into football. I was the fat kid in the neighborhood and he got me into sports, which I'm grateful for. He got me into football and that led to me being a strong safety defensively, which was funny because as a kid, I was an offensive lineman. When I got to high school, hormones and everything, I went from being the biggest kid to now just being an average kid. I was playing in the secondary on a football team, which means you had to be somewhat fast. That was an interesting thing. I'm not sure if there are any commonalities there but that's the explanation.
Nathan
Those two things don't seem to be related but I feel like it defines you well. You're a very interesting guy but hard to nail down with the definition. That high school career set the pace or set the tone for the rest of your career.
Dustin
I will say that I've been very fortunate to be around other individuals who have challenged me. They have an interesting point of view and that's why I'm grateful for what I get to do to help WealthFit and the WealthFit Nation. It’s to meet fascinating people and pull out the parts that are interesting, things that we can all benefit from, myself included. I went to a private school and I went to public school. I moved around the country a lot because my dad was in the military, so I had to acclimate. I had to figure out people and yet I was still an introvert at the same time. That's set it all up for today.
Nathan
You were born in Okinawa, right?
Dustin
That's right. For those that don't know, Okinawa is in Japan and I always like to say I can still be President. I used to quiz people on that and that's because I was born on a military base, which is considered American soil. I was born in Japan and lived there for two years but I don't remember it. Then came here to the States and we bounced around a little bit.
Nathan
I like to get into what you do for WealthFit because it's truly amazing and some of your previous ventures and companies. You've been on an entrepreneurship path for a long time. What led to that post-college? What happened early in your life to set you up for those types of goals? Not everyone is attracted to entrepreneurship. Usually it comes later in life, but it seemed to be with you for a long time.
Dustin
I was very fortunate. My mother, growing up, she traditionally had jobs. She was an accountant. She was an auditor, so she did the Corporate America thing. She worked for Shell Oil and Eckerd when that was around, which is now Walgreens essentially. On the side, she always had a side hustle. That was even before the word was invented or I'm sure it existed but no one used it. She would do arts and crafts. I remember she got me into eBay. She became addicted. She also liked to buy on eBay and shop, but she got me addicted to eBay. In college and in high school, I would sell stuff around the house. There was always this little entrepreneurial weave, if you want to call it that or backstory. I didn't know it at the time and I picked that up from her. I don't remember being influenced this early on but in grade school, I would sell these rocks like rocks that go in a plant, those little glass gem things. I remember I would go, and I would sell those in grade school until I got told not to do that because there was this big competition and rivalry with somebody else that was in the business. It was like this little competition going on and it got a little heated. This was young on. My mother, just watching her do arts and crafts, would go to fairs doing different things, that set the seed, but I forgot about all that.
This is where the Rastafarianism checks the conversation. I was on the path to follow in my dad's footsteps. He went to the Air Force Academy. I was trying to win dad's approval and live up to that. It's hard to get into the Academy and so I always thought I was going to be military. Then I just woke up senior year, that was right when the reggae and Rastafarianism were kicking and I said, “I don't want to go that path.” I had been thinking I was going to do this my whole life, dressed up in the military. I had a strong influence. I woke up one day, which seems to be a reoccurring thing in my life, waking up and finding like, “This isn't the path for me.” I went to Florida State, got a degree and I was like, “I don't know what I'm going to do.” I was into computer programming coding web pages. You had to do it by HTML. Along the way, I graduated and I didn't know what I was going to do. I didn't try hard in school. I was into wakeboarding and playing tennis and I just hung out. I didn't party and go out every night, but I wasn't super bookworm either. I didn't do any extracurriculars like an internship or volunteer. I didn't do all the stuff you're supposed to do if you want to go that route.
I got out of school and I had a girlfriend at the time. She got a job and she moved to Atlanta. I was left behind and I was like, “I've got to do something.” That's when I came across Rich Dad Poor Dad. I read that book and I was like, “Holy moly, you can buy and sell houses.” I was still dating this girl at the time and I read that first book. It opened my eyes the widest they could have ever been open and I went and bought every single book in the Rich Dad series because I was consumed. I stopped paying attention to my girlfriend, which is why she broke up with me. I was so consumed by these words and this line of thinking and it just resonated with me. I did the only thing I knew to do. It was to go find my Rich Dad and I found a real estate investor club. I said, “Teach me how to buy a house and I'll come work for free,” because I wanted to find that Rich Dad.
This entrepreneurial mindset started there and has led me to WealthFit and what I'm doing now. It's part mom. I'm fascinated by what gets people to take action whether that's sales, marketing, business, personal development. It's all in the same conversation as how do we get people to do things? How do we change our life? How do we motivate ourselves? How do we motivate others? That's what I've been obsessed with ever since I got to reading Rich Dad Poor Dad and marketing books. That's what I’ve become fascinated by.
Nathan
That book has had such a profound influence on so many different people, including Andy, the Founder of WealthFit and Justin McCormick.
Dustin
It came full circle. I'm grateful and I love what I do and get to do here for the show and in general. I interviewed Rich Dad. To now come at a full circle and to now talk to him, interview him, get his ideas and get to talk to him voice-to-voice was quite an amazing experience. Like life, you never know what's going to happen. You read someone’s book or you hear them speak and maybe ten years or twenty years later, you might be sitting across from them. You might be interviewing them. It's crazy.
Nathan
You have a good track record of businesses you founded and worked for. I'd like to run through them. I'm inventing a segment for the podcast here called The Good, The Bad and The Ugly. I like to go over the companies you founded and for each one, I like to know maybe like an elevator pitch or an explanation of the business, your greatest personal takeaway and then how it ended.
Dustin
The first one was a virtual airline. I was into the flight simulators because dad was in the military flying planes for the Air Force. I became fascinated with Microsoft Flight Simulator. Back in the day, you’ve got a joystick and the computer. You could build your own virtual airline. There was no money changing hands but I think of that as my first entrepreneurial venture. It’s not my first one, the selling of the rocks was. That's when it started. I put a lot of time into it. I'll never forget I was sitting in the back of the house on the computer and I remember I needed to take a headshot. I put on the nicest shirt I have, which is a polo and I put on glasses, which I never wear. I was trying to look professional and I remember taking the head shot there. Essentially I built a virtual airline, which allowed me to get planes to people that they could download and fly in there. I remember that one. I never monetized that. I wish I had thought to. I could have but I didn't get the thought to do that. The next entrepreneurial thing was eBay. I would sell stuff on eBay. I was big into tennis and I always wanted to trade up. I wanted to get new racquets and so I would sell the old ones. Early on, I needed to include bonuses. Everyone on eBay just sells the thing and throw stuff up there.
My biggest takeaway was to tell the story and to give people what they want to see. Everyone's afraid of getting ripped off, or at least at the time they were on eBay. I would take a bunch of pictures. This was before eBay allowed you to upload twelve pictures. I figured out how to code. It took me down this rabbit hole of, “How do I get more pictures in my listing?” I figured out how to put up a website and reference it. It's completely geeky but nonetheless, it taught me to figure out different things. It taught me problem-solving at that point. It also taught me that when you incentivize people and give them bonuses or make them feel like they're getting a deal, and they are getting a deal, it’s not about hoodwinking them. It's like, “How can I add more value?” I'll give them a can of tennis balls. I've got twenty of them sitting in the garage, “Buy this racquet and you get a can of tennis balls.” I would sell my things faster. I would get a little bit above what the other people were getting. That taught a little bit about business and a lot about psychology and how to get people to act. I didn't study and didn't know anything. The next entrepreneurial adventure for me was working at this company called Foreclosures Daily, which was showing people real estate. This was starting to get my real estate background.
Nathan
Did this come out of the local real estate investing group that you joined? How did you find this company?
Dustin
I read Rich Dad Poor Dad and I went down to an investor club. I know it's crazy. I'm introverted or I was introverted. At the time, I went into this room and I remember there were 300 people there. This was in the real estate heyday, so everyone was going nuts over real estate. I walk into this room and it sounds like I'm on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. People are yelling these terms out, “I’ve got a 3-2 block in South Tampa Heights.” I just graduated and I was eighteen or nineteen around that time frame. I’ve never bought a house, so I wasn't thinking about 3-2 blocks and those terms. To me, it was like, “Whoa.” I was nervous because I didn't know anyone and so I retreated. The introvert took me outside and I went to the area where I know people would want to talk to me. That was the vendor area because they wanted to sell something. That's where I met one of the founders of the company. I said, “Teach me how to buy a house and I'll come work for free.” As luck would have it or as fate would have it, there was a startup company there and the guy that was there didn't know how to turn on a computer. He was a jock and I'm like a nerdy computer guy who wants to learn real estate or at least I think I do. He was like, “Come with me,” and I was basically his secretary. I showed him how to turn on a computer and work email. That's where I started to learn stuff. That's how I got into Foreclosures Daily.
Nathan
What year would that be?
Dustin
I graduated in 2004. I moved back in with the parents, which was tough. Then I went to that investor’s club because I was like, “I’ve got to go figure out what to do now.” My degree was in Information Systems. I didn't have any prospects. I didn't have the résumé so I went to that club and charted my new course in life.
Nathan
Little did you know it will lead you down a pretty exciting path.
Dustin
It's crazy thinking about it. You asked about some of the other ventures. After being there for three years and seeing the growth of that, I said, “I've got to go do this for myself. I’ve got to share information.” This idea that we have at WealthFit, how to be an entrepreneur and how to take your knowledge and turn it into something that can make you money. For me, I was like, “I know marketing now,” but again I was introverted and I didn't have the self-confidence and I said, “I'm not an expert but I know how to do this.”
That's where I went and found a guy who was an expert. I was like, “Let me do your marketing for you. Here's what it cost.” He took me up on the deal and he was a business credit guru. I was like, “You can do this for people. Do it for me.” I handed him everything that he handed me, almost like a barter. It wasn't planned that way. I needed money. I was like, “Go get me a business credit.”This was still with the heyday where credit was like candy. Anyone with a pulse could get it. With him, he was able to help me get $93,000 in business lines of credit, credit cards from the bank at 0% interest. Just as Rich Dad opened my eyes, my mouth was open just as wide. I was like “This is like the greatest thing ever.” I was like, “Mark,” he was the guy who did it, “You're an expert in this. Let's package this up and let's put it into an info product,” and we did.
We partnered up on it and we created a business credit course. He was the expert. I was the marketing guy and now forced to sell, be on webinars and go on stages and offer this. Than Merrill one of the guys that we gave one of his very first stages to at Foreclosures Daily, returned the favor to me when I was doing this business credit thing and let me come and speak at a Fortune Builders event on business credit. That was my next entrepreneurial venture. For me, the big lesson is I'm a relationship guy at the end of the day and you just never know where you're going to end up in life. Never burn any bridges. Treat people kindly and always add value. I did that.
That's one of the reasons why I'm here now. I did that with Andy and Justin back in the day even though it was very short. We didn't have a crazy relationship just because we didn't spend time. Andy lived in Hawaii and I lived on the other side of the world essentially from Florida. I added value there. The market started to turn and I wasn't passionate about business credit. I was very shocked about how much money I got. I said, “People need this. They need to hear this message.” I discovered that my true passion is marketing and what gets people to take action, which is like personal growth like what are the things that get people to move and to do things? Marketing is that essentially. I said, “I need to do something,” but I didn't know what.
At the time, I started doing these product launches which was very popular. It's getting a whole bunch of people to email. I started doing these product launches for these real estate info marketers or entrepreneurs and people started booking me out. At the same time, the guy that I was essentially a secretary for, he was leaving his business. He needed to reinvent himself and he was like, “Dustin, we can do an event together. I'm going to teach people how to speak and sell from the stage and on webinars. Why don't you teach them your product launch and marketing stuff?” I said, “That's a great idea. I'm a marketer. Let's do this in six months.” Dave, the guy, he said, “I need to reinvent. I'm facing bankruptcy. Let's do it in 30 days.” I was like, “Let’s negotiate. All right, Dave, three months.” Dave was like, “No, 30 days.” I was like, “This negotiation is not going very good,” because as a marketer, you want time to build a window.
Essentially, we do it in 31 days. He comes up a day because it fell on a weird part of the week, so it was 31 days. We put 90 people in a room, and not just people but influencers, and he talked about speaking. I talked about marketing and that's when Speaking Empire was born. I did that for about nine years. I traveled the world speaking on marketing and how do you get people excited, how do you get people to show up on a webinar and direct response marketing, a lot of the stuff that we do here at WealthFit. If you want to call it a guru, that's what I was. I wrote books on that. I gave seminars and coached people on doing it. I woke up one day and said, “My time here is done.” That's when I decided I was done. I was crazy, I never thought I'd be that guy.
Nathan
In nine years, who was the most interesting person you ever worked with?
Dustin
When you say interesting, I immediately go to a painful story and it was at the very end, which was a sign. There was a guy that we did business with and we shouldn’t have done the deal. Me, as the chief, I knew what was happening and I put people on it, but I was trying to abdicate responsibility. For the wrong reason, we did an event with but it ultimately put the nail in the coffin that led me out of there and leaving my own company that I founded being bought out. In terms of positive, it's tough to say a specific person. We worked with a lot of celebrities and names and I, for sure, could say some of them were inspiring. I was always fascinated by the person that didn't have a name that would go out, use some of the strategies or take a part of a speech I said a year ago and say, “I listened to that one thing that you said among other stuff but I implemented that one thing that you said specifically and I got this result. I was completely skeptical the whole time. I went out, I tried it and it worked. I'm so grateful.”That was the most interesting part for me. It was the success and how it lit up in me when I would try something that I read in a book and I'm like, “This is magic. This works,” like people will give you money if you make the button yellow or red or whatever the strategy of the day is. That was what was most interesting, fascinating and gratifying to me.
Nathan
I imagine most business owners feel the same as the most satisfying thing when you meet the famous person because of the business but the change you make in ordinary people's lives. You did that for so long. Just for context, the company was premised around teaching people, teaching high-level executives or people who aspire to be high-level executives how to do presentations that sell well. Is that correct?
Dustin
I would say it was more entrepreneurial-focused. We would work with solopreneurs, with maybe small business owners of ten or less, everyone from a chiropractor doing lunch and learns to, “Come to my office so I can crack your back,” is the way you say it all the way to people that are infopreneurs, stock traders, real estate folks and coaches. We did get some execs. We’ve got some politicians in there as well. Anyone that had to get people to act to do something whether sign up for appointments, sell the board on taking the next step or sell a product or service, that was our marketplace. Not super corporate-y but a flavor of it.
Nathan
It's super interesting to me that that was the focus of your business because as I was doing this research on you for this podcast, I found out that you were not always so excited about presenting and speaking in front of people. Is that right?
Dustin
That is right. I believe what you're referencing is at FSU.I went to Florida State University. One of the requirements to graduate was you had to do public speaking. I signed up for the class, I entered the class and I remember going in and walking into the auditorium. It was like stadium seating and there were 300. I remember it felt like the New York Stock Exchange. People were talking. I took my seat and the professor walked out on stage. He said, “You're going to have to do ten talks,” and everyone was quiet now. I was looking around and my mouth was hanging open. I was like, “Ten talks?” He was like, “Don't worry, some of them are going to be in small groups but two or three of them are going to be in front of this whole room.” I was like, “Whoa,” so I bailed because you could take it later in the course of your time there. I was like, “That sucks. Maybe I can find a smaller thing or maybe there's a virtual online public speaking class.” I signed up again and I was like, “This is odd.” I walked to the same part of campus. Sure enough, I walked into the same building. It was the same exact setup. It was the same spiel. I've done a lot of personal work, growth and stuff and I'd like to say at that moment, I was my best and my most advanced self, but I wasn't. I bailed again.
What's interesting and fascinating was I became so motivated to not take this class that I went, and I did more work than the class would have required. I went and started talking to teacher’s aides. I looked at the student handbook and no one reads the student handbook. I read it looking for a loophole. I went and started talking to other people and like, “There's got to be a way for me not to take this class and still graduate.” I found a loophole. I found it and one of the loopholes was if you've taken this one class in high school, you could get out of it. Fortunately for me, I had taken this class not because I wanted to. The true story is I was chasing a girl. She was in this particular class. It was called Model United Nations and it’s like what it sounds. You pretend you're a country. We were Great Britain there and so I publicly spoke in front of a couple of hundred kids selling the point of Great Britain's policy on something like just something crazy. I was completely blinded by trying to impress this girl that I didn't realize what I was doing.
When I found out I had taken this class, they said, “You need to get your teacher to write a note.” I don't know how I thought of this, but I know it from marketing is you never want to make someone jump through a hurdle. At that moment, I was so motivated. I was like, “I wrote the note for you. Feel free to change it up but if you're good with it, just sign it and send it back to me so I can send it in so that I can get credit for this course.”The teacher wanted to change it and make it his own. He signed it and I got out of public speaking. I didn't have to take the class and that's funny. Sometimes life knocks at the door. Are we ready to answer? I don't know that that class was going to change my life but me running from it ended up surfacing later in life where now I started a company where I was a marketing expert, but I had to get up on the stage. I couldn't be the one hiding out if I was the founder of a company teaching people how to speak and so I had to learn it quick. I started a company on top of that showing other people as if karma wanted me to get this lesson. That's how it worked for me.
Nathan
That's one of the few examples where the silly things we do for the opposite sex when we were young works out for us in the future. What was your process like going from being terrified of public speaking to being so good at it?
Dustin
Brute force. I remember at the time when I was volunteering, this was back to the real estate company where we were doing a seminar. Dave was closing on his condo and he said, “Dustin, you're going to have to do it.” I told him the story I explained, which was like, “I'm not the guy to do this. I clapped out. Here's the whole story.” I gave him every reason why I wasn't the guy. I wasn't getting paid. I was interning but essentially he was like, “You have to do this.” With my back up against the wall, I remember going home and taking a shower and I was visualizing that. This was before I started getting into the books and learning about visualization and all this thinking and seeing stuff happen before it happens.
I was doing it just to calm my nerves and I remember the hot water running over me. I got out of the shower, the phone rang and it was Dave. Dave said, “I’ve got some good news and bad news.” I was like, “Lay it on me.” He said, “The bad news is I'm not closing on my house,” and I was thinking, “That's not bad news, that's great news.”He said, “The good news is I can do the gig tonight.” I was like, “This is great.” I hung up the phone, I got ready and life is good. Then about an hour later, he called me. I looked at the phone and I was like, “Oh, man.”It’s like one of those moments in life where you know. I look at the phone and I reluctantly answered and he was like, “You're going to have to do the presentation.” I ended up giving the presentation that night and I nailed it.
It was great because I was so afraid of it and I was forced to do it and I'm grateful for that. Once I experienced it, it was amazing. It wasn't as bad as I thought it was. I had a severe baby face at the time and I was like, “No one is going to listen to me.” There were people triple my age at the time in the room and I was like ,“They're not going to take me seriously.” What I discovered at that moment was if you've got information, if you've got a cure, if you've got a solution for somebody and they're in pain or they want to change their life, or they want to make a difference in their world, they will listen to whoever. All that stuff goes away. I'm not saying people don't judge and people don't prejudice in that. I'm just saying when the pain is there or when somebody truly wants something, that stuff goes out the window and they're there to listen and try to get any edge they can. I realized it at that moment and so all that stuff went away. I said, “I’ve got to do more of this.” I also started to experience right around that time, it’s whenever we step out of that comfort zone and are nervous, that's when the biggest growth happens. I was like, “I’ve got to do this.”
Nathan
I'm trying to imagine this process of you going through this change from being very introverted and terrified of public speaking to nine years later where it's second nature to you. What do you think were the biggest a-ha moments for you down the road about public speaking? What do most people get wrong about public speaking?
Dustin
The biggest impact for me was reading this article. I forget the names, they escape me now, but it was two famous musicians. One was like Bruce Springsteen, someone of that nature, and one was someone very famous as well who had a very different experience. They profiled Bruce and they said, “Bruce, after 50 years, 40 years of going out and performing, do you still get nervous before you go on stage?” He said, “Nervous? Do you mean that feeling you get right before you get on stage where the blood is coursing through your body letting you know that you're alive?” I said, “That's an interesting way to describe nervousness.”Essentially, that's what he was describing. Then they went to the other person, a very famous singer and she had to be pried from the dressing room or the green room to go out and perform. This person was amazing and yet had this fear of being in front of others.
I said, “The way that they communicate and talk to themselves was completely different.” It's the same feeling for me, however it was how you describe it. Even up until my last speech that I gave, there was still that excitement that runs through my veins letting me know like, “I'm alive and I'm about to go and do my thing.” Having the right mindset and what you tell yourself is incredibly important. For me, I was telling myself a lot of things before I did it, “I'm too young. They're not going to listen to you. What if you forget your lines?” and all that stuff. That doesn't serve you. That was the biggest takeaway for me and the biggest takeaway that I share with people to help them go up there.
Nathan
Perspective can make or break you. I wouldn't have expected that to be your takeaway but that makes a lot of sense.
Dustin
It's a funny thing. A lot of people understand when you get up there, not to say you're not going to have hecklers and things like that, but people pull for you. At the end of the day, we just want to learn stories from each other. We love stories and so if you can tell stories, you don't have to be polished. You don't have to be perfect. You don't have to have seventeen jokes but if you can tell your stories in life that you believe will resonate with a certain section of the audience, that always wins. You don't need all the flashy stuff. People are craving authenticity more than ever and so the slick, polished person does not do as well nowadays. It's more the authentic storyteller just sharing and being vulnerable.
Nathan
That's not what I would expect as a takeaway but that makes complete sense. That's the answer in everything else, so why wouldn't it be in public speaking also. You wrote an article for WealthFit.com
Dustin
I should say that it was one of the highly trafficked articles only because we're very early in getting articles out there. As we grow, I don't expect it to be. The reason why it resonated for some people is I was completely vulnerable. It took me less than a year to talk about it. At Empire, we had an attorney friend who was our counselor. We were negotiating on the same side of the table yet when I left, I now felt what it was like to be the only person negotiating for myself. I could have for sure enlisted an attorney to help me, but I wanted to do it in a certain way. Maybe that's a shortcoming of me but these were my friends for ten years. In the end, it definitely got a little interesting so to say. I still talk to both of the co-founders or partners in the business. I wanted to do it my way essentially. It took me about nine months to talk about it. It was a quiet exit. Part of the negotiation on the way out was I wasn’t going to do anything to jeopardize the company, which is perfect to me. I didn't want to come out and start bashing. I wanted to hide. I wanted to go away from the spotlight because I had been in the spotlight for nine-plus years there.
For me, I needed time to process and think about it. It was one of the hardest things I've done. I'm glad I did it but the personal journey from that point forward has been night and day. I've had some of my darkest nights since leaving Empire and the reason for that is I had a lot of identity and ego attached to it. I was the company. I was Speaking Empire. I was a successful person because my business was successful and I'm realizing that's not the case and yet that was a lesson I needed to learn. I didn't want to talk about it for the longest time. I didn't know how to process it. I also didn't want to burn any bridges either. I didn't want to have customers be upset. I didn't want to burn bridges with my former partners. When I wrote it, I started getting up early in the morning. You did help me write it. That time was more about sharing that story and me just moving on. I was ready at that time to tell the story when we released it. I'm glad I did and it felt great. It hit a lot of chord with people. I got phone calls, Facebook messages, Facebook posts, all sorts of things. People were like, “I can't believe it. We support you.” I was overwhelmed by that. I didn't expect anything to happen from that article other than, “Dustin needed to write that article to feel better,” and just move on. The support was great.
Nathan
I didn't know that you got a lot of support on that article. That's great and I'm happy to hear it. I thought that article was on point. It's such a common problem for entrepreneurs. Seth Godin writes about the dip that we almost go through, the hard part that you push through. Eventually you get to a more profitable, easy life, a more profitable part of the business life cycle where your time is worth more and you're getting a greater return for the energy you put in. Seth Godin says the difficult part of every business is knowing when to push through the dip and when to quit. It's a tough question that there is no good answer for it, but your article does it in such a fantastic job of giving such a good perspective on what that decision is like. It's so obvious that you were working incredibly hard, incredibly smart and you still weren't happy with the way it was going. It's an interesting read. For anyone who hasn't read it, I recommend checking that out on WealthFit.com, Dustin's article, Why I Quit the Company I Founded. Let's talk about something even more incredible that you do now. How did you end up finding WealthFit? How did you become the Chief Wealth Evangelist?
Dustin
It was a great time of year. This was only in 2017, October 13th or 17th or something like that. October was my last official day. This is great for me because I took time off. I have two young boys, Dexter and Forest. It was my favorite time of year, the holidays, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas. I was baking pumpkin muffins. I was carving pumpkins. We were doing Halloween stuff. It was great. We were building sand castles in the backyard and I was fully present with them the first time ever other than maybe their birth. It was great because I didn't have anything on my mind. There was no business anymore. It was just I could do that. I spent some great quality time with them and still do. It has shaped how I conduct myself now. It's taught me about boundaries. We did that and had an amazing time. I spent time with family in St. Petersburg. That's where I was living.
Nathan
Can I ask what do you mean it taught you about boundaries?
Dustin
It planted the seed for boundaries. Now doing what I do at WealthFit, I am smarter with my time because I have imposed boundaries that I didn't have at Empire. If I needed to put out a fire at Empire, I would do it. I still do that here because we're in startup mode and I love the game, don't get me wrong. However, I said when I get into this next venture that I'm going to embark on, I've got to do things differently. I want to spend quality time. I want to be present with my boys. I'm like, “I've got to change my mindset. I've got to change my operating system.” That's what I did. I planted that seed there and then when I came here, it started to creep back to me. I was like, “I'm doing the same thing I did at Empire. I need to put boundaries in place.” That's like checking out on the weekend when I'm with them. If they're sleeping and I want to go read a book on business or I want to watch a video or something like that or check an email, I allow myself to do that. When I'm with them, when we're out having fun and we're doing what we do, walk in the neighborhood, going on hikes, that sort of thing. That's what I mean.
Nathan
We have three strong leaders at WealthFit, Andy, Justin and yourself. All of you noticeably set aside time for family and make it a priority. In a world where tech culture is all about working as much as you can and even taking mind-enhancing drugs to work harder longer, the fact that you guys place a priority on your family in a way makes the company more productive. It creates a culture of safety and it makes everyone more attached to the company's mission. It makes people believe in the leadership more. It makes everyone more down to Earth. It reminds us that true wealth, the object of becoming WealthFit is to have time for your family. It's not to slave away until you're 80 and then sit on the stacked dollar bills in your house and maybe play with your grandkids then. It's to enjoy your family in the present as much in the future. I appreciate that you do that and that all of the leaders of WealthFit do that. Tell me about your journey and finding WealthFit.
Dustin
I took time off and come in January, the New Year is when people buy the gym memberships. I started itching. It's the creator itch, the entrepreneurial itch. I’ve got to do something. I didn't get a massive payday either. Financially, I wasn’t in a great place to take three years off and go to India and do all these things. When I exited, the company wasn't doing that great financially. We had great lives, but the company couldn't support a big massive payday as you see on TV or like you read about on Tech Crunch. I didn't get this crazy amazing payday so that was a factor as well. I said, “What are people doing out there?” I want to get behind something because I had lost my steam for the last couple of years at Empire and I need to get reinvigorated. I was given a great advice by my wife and my coach. I still had a coach at the time too. I had a coach even though I was in the business. It was like, “What do I do? How do I figure myself out?” because I'm big on that. We need coaches, we need people in our lives, mentors to give us a different perspective and sometimes family members, like my wife, is a little too close and yet I'm finding out, “I don't necessarily need a coach because she's told me all these years ago.” I'm paying the guy to tell me what she told me, but I do need it because it's too close sometimes.
The advice was to make a list. Dexter had a chalkboard wall and I made a list of everybody to call. Some of these people I didn't want to call but the exercise was, “You make that list and start calling people. Pick up the phone.” For me, I like talking to people, but I like to do it on my terms. The thought of me interrupting people and calling them was a struggle. Some people were easier to call than others and yet I went through that whole list. I was so impressed and fascinated with what people are up to in the world. I'm very fortunate that I have a great network and a lot of them are entrepreneurs, up to great things in the world. I was like, “There are so many different things I could do.” I was looking at crypto. I was looking at the Cannabis space, not because I'm personally interested but it's a booming space. As a marketer, you want to look at that. Crypto was blowing up at the time. This was before the Christmas crash. It was right around there and it was a hot conversation. One of those people was Andy and Than Merrill.
Than, for those who don't know, is an investor in the company. I texted Than and no answer. I was like, “I want to see what Than is up to. I know he's busy.” I texted Andy, but I didn't hear back from Andy for a while because I didn't realize it was six hours’ time difference from Florida to Hawaii. Andy started to chat me up and Than talked to Andy and said, “You should call him and see,” so we ended up connecting. I was like, “This is cool. I’m going to be out in San Diego for Traffic &Conversion because I was looking for opportunities.” I thought I would get in the chatbot space. That's where I sat down with Than and the crew here. I had a couple of calls with Andy and I was like, “I love this vision.”
The vision that I'm so excited about is while I was at Empire doing my entrepreneurial thing, I never paid attention to my finances. Missy managed the money in the house. My thought was, “I'm going to go make the money. She's going to figure out how to manage it.” I was like, “If I had to do it all over again, we would do it together as a family. I would have been making investments along the way because what if it doesn't work out?”That's my big mission and vision to bring to WealthFit. That's the mission. When they shared that with me, I was like, “I can help other founders, other people that maybe are on a similar path putting their heart and soul into a business because that's what we're told to do and just giving everything but not being mindful of their money, their finances, their investments. I want to change that.” That's why I got fired up and excited about this.
Nathan
It’s like you said, never burn bridges. You met Andy, Justin and Than a long ago and you ended up working on a project.
Dustin
The funny side note story to that is I did a product launch for Than back in the day. I came out to San Diego and he let me sleep on his couch. I was paid as a consultant. He was like, “Why don’t you go and sleep on my couch?” I was like, “All right.” This was before I was married. I did that and then he also almost killed me. I'm allergic to shrimp. We went to Rubio’s. Rubio’s is like a Taco Bell but better out here. He ordered a shrimp burrito and I ordered a chicken burrito or something like that. I didn't look at the tags or whatever when we got home. We were in launch mode, so it was crazy. We were not paying attention to anything that's not launch related. I took two bites of his burrito and I was like, “I'm not feeling good.” I looked down and I was like, “I'm eating your burrito. I've got to lay down.” I slept it off, got back up and then we were back into launch mode.
Nathan
I know everyone at WealthFit is excited about this podcast. Could you briefly go over what exactly you do at WealthFit?
Dustin
I'm a recruiter. You said, Chief Wealth Evangelist. This is the title that entrepreneurs can relate to. We're not big on titles here on WealthFit. However, to the outside world, it's beneficial to have one. I'm a marketer at heart. I have a great identity with that. When I was off, I was studying Guy Kawasaki. I was reading his books and I was like, “That's what I am. I'm an evangelist.” I started saying like, “I want to become an evangelist with the next venture that I do.” The key difference between what's an evangelist is one, it's like a biblical thing and that's not me. I'm not evangelizing a religion here,” but Guy Kawasaki made it famous at Apple for not being in sales but still selling the vision, selling the dream. That was his role. He was a Tech Evangelist at Apple and I was like, “At WealthFit, I’m a wealth evangelist.” What that means is that I go out and spread this message of anyone can have wealth in society. Anyone can create it. It's just a matter of getting your mindset in alignment with what wealthy people do.
I sell the company. Sell is such a strong word nowadays, but I get people excited about WealthFit and we've got a podcast. There’s a platform to get people into the message and get people excited about that. I go out and recruit course trainers. All the courses that are coming out shortly and will continue to come out are from people that are vetted, from people that show us how to create wealth not just in the financial sense but in all areas of our life. How do you create more time for yourself? How do you create more finances? How do you create more influence on the things that you want to do? Maybe you want to start a charity, maybe you want to donate to a cause, whatever influence means to you, that's what I do. My day-to-day looks like going out talking to people to go recruit and attract people for the show and also into WealthFit to create world-class courses for us so that we all can learn how to create wealth.
Nathan
That was a great explanation of what you do. Everyone is super impressed with the people that you've been recruiting. You had Jesse Itzler on the podcast. You had Robert Kiyosaki. Who has been the most interesting person you've interviewed for WealthFit so far?
Dustin
I got an email from Justin asking me for that. These are like your kids. It's like asking who's your favorite kid. They're all my favorites. Some of the ones that were surprising have been Shannon Miller, the seven-time Olympic gold medalist. The Magnificent Seven for those folks that know that reference. It was the first time the Americans had beaten the Russians in Women's Gymnastics. What was fascinating about that was that feat of being there in Georgia Dome with 30,000 people. However, more fascinating than that was her story about overcoming ovarian cancer. 50% of women that get that type of ovarian cancer she got don't make it. She went on to conquer that and then have kids. I thought that was very fascinating. She has a little empire that she's building with multiple businesses in it. I thought that was a rather fascinating show. Tony Nardolillo came out. He's a movie producer with a ten-year journey to make a Hollywood movie, scrappy. The Hollywood storytelling in the movie is great. The podcast is a close second. You will lose track of time in that show. I did and was blown away. It could be its own movie, his journey of how he got that movie made or a Netflix series or something. That is one of my favorites.
Nathan
For the audience, if you haven't checked out those podcasts, definitely check them out there. They're both incredible. I'd recommend both of them. You've managed to get so many high-quality course trainers and podcast guests since you started. You've been here less than a year and you're killing it.I know everyone is super impressed with your performance. They are amazing people that you've got. Do you consider what you do networking? How do you think about recruiting people?
Dustin
In one sense, networking would be the term that people call it. At the end of the day, it's about building value for people. I leverage all the assets. There are no rules for me, not in the negative sense like I'm not out to break rules. This would be an example that if someone found out that I did Speaking Empire and I had this crazy speaking background and they say, “I know you do this. Would you consult me?” I would say, “I'm happy to do that. I'm going to do it for free.” I wouldn't charge them to do it because I want to build the value for them in that relation. It doesn’t mean everyone that instant messages me or sends me an email that I'm going to do it, but what I look to do is I look to leverage everything from this point in my life. If they want a copy of a book, if they want me to review a website, if they want me to make an introduction to someone else, if I can provide value to that person. I look to do it even beyond the scope of what I do here at WealthFit. It's about how do you help someone with what they're working on? How do you be a good steward? How do you make someone else's life easier? I always look for that. Some people call it networking. I look to build value for people whatever that looks like.
Nathan
The reason I ask that question is that it's the same impression that I get from you. When you think of networking and especially what you learn, it's like a business undergrad course that you know you walk around this room greasing people with corny jokes and business cards. I went to FinCon with you and I was so fascinated by your approach to meeting people because you're not just looking for a payout. You're not looking to take from people. You're just looking to provide value in any way you can and you're not just aiming for important people, you're there to meet interesting people and help how you can. It's so interesting how effective it is to be motivated not by the things you want but what you can do for other people.
Dustin
I appreciate that. It is a good way to go in life. I learn from you as well because we met some people not knowing that space, not having been to that event before or being in that arena. For me, I always generally trust people. You taught me that maybe we should vet this person more or like don't take everything at face value. We definitely vet here at WealthFit, but when you meet someone new, it's a little tricky sometimes because if you lead with value, you may have to deal with some tire kickers. I chalk that up to overage or spillages or whatever the term is. I'd rather be friendly to people and figure out how to make it work than not trust them. Flexibility is a keyword that has served me a lot.
Nathan
I'd like to hit you some speed round questions. Some of these are from your own repertoire. You're going to get hit with your own medicine. What does your investment portfolio look like?
Dustin
I’ve got some stocks. I’ve got real estate. I'm fascinated by life insurance. I have a life insurance policy and that's a big debate we have here. Andy’s in favor of one vehicle. I'm in favor of another. There’s no bitcoin.
Nathan
What’s your guilty pleasure with money?
Dustin
Education. I love to learn. I love to buy books. I love to learn new information. Aside from that, my guiltier pleasure would be around tennis and tennis lessons. I'm not so much into racquets anymore, I found a good one. I like tennis shoes.
Nathan
How much are we talking about here? How much is a high-quality tennis racquet? How much is a high-quality pair of tennis shoes?
Dustin
For me, $100 to $150. They're more if you get the LeBron James New Edition. I'm not a big basketball guy, so basketball shoes aren't my thing, but tennis shoes like on a tennis court, those are my thing. Those are my jam, so $150 if I'm splurging.
Nathan
Are you still taking tennis lessons now? Do you have a tennis coach?
Dustin
I do. I just haven't been on the court in a while. I got the young ones and Bush Forest isn't sleeping as well, so I haven't done tennis in a bit, but I still have a coach. I just need to get them on the calendar again.
Nathan
You're in a stoicism. I know you were talking about reading lots of books on stoicism when I saw you at FinCon. How far down the rabbit hole are you?
Dustin
I'm consumed. I'm way down and I’m proud of it. This is an interesting point in my life. When I went to Florida State, I wanted to be a philosophy major because in high school, we took this class and I was like, “I love philosophy.” I signed up for some classes and my parents found out and they were like, “No, you're not studying that. We’re not paying for you to go to school and you come out with a philosophy degree.” I would still go to lectures. I didn't know about Stoicism back then. I don't remember about it. It's come full circle and I love it. The reason why was I started to lose my identity. I started to go to dark places. I was very much attached to my ego and that drove a lot of the things that I did, books being put out which isn't necessarily a bad thing. You don't want people to think like having an ego is a bad thing. There's a healthy ego. For me, Stoicism is like the playbook for how to conduct oneself when times are good and when times are not so good. Back to some of those dark moments that I had, I wish I had discovered this stoicism. I'm fascinated by it because it hits me and it makes sense. It's logical. I've grown more than I've grown in the years. I attribute a lot of that to stoicism.
Nathan
What's the greatest principle that helps you the most in stoicism?
Dustin
Detachment is a big thing. Who are we to create this career, this vision for our self and make it come about? It’s weird because if you're an entrepreneur, you hustle, you will do things into existence. It's very contradictory and I can't explain it. I used to argue with the books and people and I was like, “These are conflicting ideas,” but having been with it for a bit, being detached, wanting to go out and create a better future for your family, great, do it but detach from it. If it doesn't happen in two days,like if you don't get that six-figure check in two days, great, keep plugging away. It's this duality. Even more so than that is we're going to die. I know people have said that and it's a shocking thing. I have an app on my phone that I've projected that I'm going to live until 90. When you see how many days you have left on the planet, that's sobering and it's like, “Am I making the best use of my time here?”
Nathan
What is the app called?
Dustin
It's a timer app, It's a countdown timer app in days, not seconds. I don't look at the seconds going by, but I look at the amount of days I have left until I'm 90 years old. It tells me what that is and counts that down.
Nathan
I changed my background on my computer to skull, my own memento mori. It’s such an important thing and I try to get our writers to think that way too. When we're trying to give people advice on investing your money, we're talking about life or death. One day they're going to die, and tomorrow is too late to start thinking about that. The sooner, the better. As soon as you realize that, you'll start making better decisions. What would you say to entrepreneurs who don’t know if they’re in the spot you’re at Speaking Empire? What would you say to entrepreneurs who are wondering whether or not they should quit or try to push through longer?
Dustin
It’s a tough question and the reason why is I have a strong EQ. When you say you appreciate how I operate at an event, I feel like I talk to people and I build value but I also read people. I don’t want to say energetically like woo-woo stuff but there are other tells. When we speak and communicate in life, it’s not just the words we say. It’s how we say it, our body language. I feel like I have a strong sense of that. Maybe it’s a little bit of a weakness. Maybe I read too much into it, but I feel like I have that strong EQ. If you’re that type of person, if you feel like you’ve got a good hand, if you have good intuition like you have this extra sense about situations and things, I would say trust your intuition. For me, so many times I had signs, I had things that were my own and I just disregarded it because I said, “I need to go hustle harder.” We innately know it’s weird and out there. We innately know where we’re supposed to go and some of us are hard-headed and we just plow through them.
If you take the time, slow down and reflect, whether that’s to meditate or go run, whatever your thing is or jam is, listen and check in with yourself. For someone who doesn’t have that, they’ve got to do exercises. They’ve got to slow themselves down too and write it out. If you write out what do you want in your life résumé, as Jesse Itzler would say, “What do you want to have accomplished? What do you want to pass down to your kids?” That would force you to realize, “Is this the path that’s going to serve you?” I’m not saying that this is easy. I don’t have the magic answer here but we’re all going to die. At the end of your life, what is the experience that you want to have had? To buy and sell a business or sell a business, that’s going to be a great experience for a lot of us. However, is that mission critical to you and your life? Would you rather just have the relationships that you formed being on that journey? I want to be able to say, “I built a unicorn.” If you know that, that’s great but not knowing that hurts you. When you have these moments in your life where you start to question things, if you don’t have a North Star or if you don’t have a plan for your life, then you’re going to disregard those signs and you’re going to make crazy decisions, ones that probably don’t serve you.
Nathan
While we were at FinCon, I noticed that you are one of the most productive people I’ve ever met. Could you describe your daily routine? What advice do you have for people who are trying to be productive?
Dustin
I feel like I’m in a work in progress in productivity. The way I’ve been making up for lack of productivity and even stronger boundaries is by getting up earlier. One of the things that I love to do is to sleep in. However, I don’t do that as much anymore. One of my hacks or routines or whatever you want to call it is I love to get up at 4:00 AM and here’s why. I’ve got two kids. One is sixteen months and so he’s still getting the sleep rhythm. There’s no quiet time in the house. Anyone with kids will appreciate this. I just have to get up early. Usually, at the end of the day, I’m super tired. What I found is I just get up at 4:00 AM and it hurts a little bit like taking a cold shower when you first do it a couple of times. However, when you’re motivated by your routine like I get up, I meditate, I read, I journal, I get excited because I’m doing personal growth stuff. That gets me up out of bed and excited.
Nathan
Do you do this every day?
Dustin
I do this every day except for days when I’m sick. On the weekend, I will wake up at 5:00 AM. This is all shifted. I’m in a state of flux right now because of daylight savings time. Usually, I always get up at 4:00 but everything is shifted so I get up at 3:00. I know that sounds crazy. I go to bed a lot earlier because of this. Typically, it’s 4:00 AM. I do with what I shared with my routine, then I have coffee. Bulletproof Coffee is my thing. I do that and I’ll do some work. I’ll write some interview questions, I’ll do research on guests who are coming on the show. I’ll do that because that’s like a journey in itself. I learn so much there. Usually, Forest will get up and I’m there hanging out on the couch or cooking breakfast for the boys and getting the house ready before mama wakes up.
Nathan
What time do you have to go to be to wake up at 3:30 or 4:00 or 4:30 AM every day?
Dustin
I’ve been going to bed at 7:00. That’s not normally my jam. I’m mindful that I need to get my body extra rest to recuperate. Before, I would just try to plow through things and I would get sick. I’ve learned I’ve got to recuperate. However, I don’t want to get complacent. I don’t want to use it as an excuse and I have every right to when I’m not feeling so great. However, I know me. It’s like a gamble. It’s like I’m all in or I’m all out. I’m trying to hack a little here and I realize it’s a dangerous and slippery slope. For me, I usually go to bed at 7:00. This is when we’re putting the kids down too. Before, it would be at 8:00 or 9:00 at night that I would go to bed, so I could wake up at 4:00. That’s perfect because mama likes to sleep in. I get the house ready. I get everything going and then at night time, we all wind down together.
Nathan
I feel like we owe Missy, your wife, an extra shout out on this podcast because she sounds like she’s so supportive and helpful.
Dustin
She definitely is. She’s an angel and amazing. Life is all about personal growth. I’ve been the best father, husband in the last couple of years. I’ve been more present. I’ve done more stuff around the house. I’ve been more productive, so I could get stuff done and go home and checkout. Plus, when you have a constraint of how I spend more time and be present with my kids, I can’t just keep working until all hours of the night and doing things. I had to get better personally. I’ve set the constraints. I had to figure out and hack around getting up earlier. I’m not taking time away from them by doing that. I’m better with time blocking and scheduling so that when I get home, I’m not worried about work or closing loops. That’s what I’ve had to learn to become better about being more productive, which is counterintuitive. That’s the trick, that’s the hack.
Nathan
Dustin, this has been truly a pleasure. I’m super proud to have done this with you and that you’ve asked me to do it. I appreciate you having me stepping out of my comfort zone and do this. I’m sure I will grow from it. What can we look forward to coming down the pipeline at WealthFit?
Dustin
Growth and expansion. There are so many cool guests coming up on the show, more on the investing category and personal growth. We have celebrities and athletes that are going to be on the show. Not just any celebs and athletes, but ones that have made the transition into entrepreneurship or maybe have a side hustle that they’re doing while they’re doing their thing because that’s the person that we want to learn from, like how did you take these things and parley them into business and what can we learn from you? My personal goal is to get out and speak more. I want to share this message via podcast. We’re going to have different shows coming up, so it won’t just be Dustin Mathews. It will be different niches, stock investing. My personal goal is to get back to the things that I love to do now, which is to speak and motivate others, share the mission and vision that we have and speaking happens to be that.
Nathan
Dustin, thank you so much for doing this and thank you for being a leader that we all admire and respect and are happy to work for.
Dustin
I appreciate it. The only thing I would change about that is, “Work with.” I don’t think we work for anybody. We all work together. Even our audience, we’re all in this together. We’re all here to share ideas and collaborate. When you do that, life becomes more fun and more productive that way.
Nathan
Thanks a lot, Dustin.

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Our special Earth Day episode is with Tyson Toussant and Alex Tapia, founders of BIONIC, a sustainable and eco-friendly thread that is changing the fashion industry.

Earth Day, The Sustainable Movement & Bionic Yarn

article
Do You Have What It Takes To Be An Entrepreneur?

In her new book “Women with Money,” Jean Chatzky gives us the top 5 traits of successful entrepreneurs. [Excerpt]

Do You Have What It Takes To Be An Entrepreneur?

Jean Chatzky

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Idea To Income

Idea To Income

How To Start a Company and Turn Your Entrepreneurial Dreams into Reality

Didi Wong

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podcast
Finding 'A' Players, 'Found Revenue' & Silicon Slopes

Tom Collins, CEO of C5 Consulting, talks about how to run a business - from finding the best people for your team to how to increase your revenue.

Finding 'A' Players, 'Found Revenue' & Silicon Slopes

podcast
From "One-Man Show" to a $160M Valuation

CEO of Maropost, Ross Paquette, shares valuable information on scaling a business from a one-man show to a multi-million dollar company.

From "One-Man Show" to a $160M Valuation

Advanced Amazon Sales Strategies

Advanced Amazon Sales Strategies

How To Get More Traffic, Optimize Your Listing, & Grow From a Simple Product Into a Successful Brand

Jason Boyce

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Start Your Own Amazon Store

Start Your Own Amazon Store

How To Launch Your First Product on Amazon.com

Jason Boyce

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podcast
Moneyball, Pitching 100 M.P.H. & Escaping The Canadian Government

Jill and Ron Wolforth are helping kids achieve their dreams by developing their skills with America's favorite pastime. However, their journey hasn't always been easy. Learn how they've grown from being uncomfortable.

Moneyball, Pitching 100 M.P.H. & Escaping The Canadian Government

podcast
Insights From A Quarter Billion Dollar Marketer

Lessons from a $250M marketer. Geoff Chadwick gives marketing insights learned from running big campaigns, building software, and more.

Insights From A Quarter Billion Dollar Marketer

Start Your Own AirBnb Business

Start Your Own AirBnb Business

How To Claim Your Share of the Fast-Growing Short-Term Rental Market

Mark Kappelman & Steven Eshkenazi

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Start Your Own Online Education Business

Start Your Own Online Education Business

How to Become an Edu-preneur And Get Paid for Teaching What You Know

Robert Skrob

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article
How to Get Free Money from the Government to Fund Your Startup

Who doesn't want cash from their favorite Uncle Sam? Here's how you can find grants and fund your business with free government money.

How to Get Free Money from the Government to Fund Your Startup

Ian Chandler

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article
How Much Do You REALLY Need to Start a Business? The Answer is Less Than You Think.

Think starting a business takes TONS of money? It doesn’t have to. Here’s how you can build your empire without breaking the bank.

How Much Do You REALLY Need to Start a Business? The Answer is Less Than You Think.

Jon Westenberg

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article
Bootstrap Your Startup & Kickstart Your Success

Launching a startup without investors may seem like a one-way ticket to failure—but it’s one of the best ways to kickstart your business.

Bootstrap Your Startup & Kickstart Your Success

Ian Chandler

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article
How to Find the Co-Founder Your Business Needs

Choosing the right cofounder can make or break your business. Find a cofounder that compliments your skill set and delivers skills that you lack.

How to Find the Co-Founder Your Business Needs

Nathan Wade

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article
Learn 5 Key Ways to Onboard Employees

Your employees are your most valuable asset. Protect your investment in them with an effective and efficient onboarding process.

Learn 5 Key Ways to Onboard Employees

Nathan Wade

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article
How to Lead Employees to Greatness: Your (Hormonal) Strategy for Success

Consider and stimulate (the right) hormones for your team. Embrace leadership tactics that foster healthy hormonal teams.

How to Lead Employees to Greatness: Your (Hormonal) Strategy for Success

Jill Huettich

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