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How to Exit College Debt Free with Ellen Long

In this show, you are going to meet Ellen Long, who calls herself a freedom fighting entrepreneur who helps people in the area of wealth. She’s in the wealth management business.

In this show, we are talking about how kids, teenagers can exit college debt-free. I don’t know if you know this, but the average student loan debt is $30,000. A lot of folks nowadays, a lot of kids leaving college and entering the workforce are being saddled with debt. This is a trend that keeps growing and growing. I didn’t realize the severity of this until this show is that a lot of people taking this debt into it or taking jobs that take three years to pay it off.

They’re not making decisions on moving their lifestyle for not buying a house. They’re not getting married because they’re concerned with all this debt entering in.

In this episode, Ellen brings the solution about how with some planning, some thinking and some strategies you can help empower your kids or yourself if you’re a young one to exit college debt-free. In fact, in some cases we talk about how some kids are getting paid to go to college, meaning they’re getting everything paid for and getting the overages. We talk a little bit about this here.

If this is of interest to you, then you definitely want to pay extra close attention to this show.

Dustin
Ellen, I want to start off with the scenario you shared with me. I want the WealthFit Nation to fully grasp this. WealthFit Nation, I want you to think about this. Your son, your daughter or perhaps even you, if we caught you early enough, you just graduated college, you’re saddled with $60,000 in debt and you take a job that gets you $30,000 your first year. This is the plight of what’s happening right now out in society. Ellen, what do you say to somebody that’s in that situation?
Ellen
There’s not a lot you can say in that situation. A lot of condolences. I’m so passionate about what we’re doing because of this scenario. This was the story of one of my good friends and we became friends after college. She tells me she has $60,000 in debt. She’s taken a job that’s making her $30,000 and the real story is she had that job for the next three to four years before she even moved out of that. It’s important to get ahead of this. There’s only so much you can do afterward. What is important is what can you do in high school and even what can you do during college to make sure that doesn’t happen.
Dustin
In your case, you exited college debt free. What are the steps that people can take so that their kids or themselves aren’t saddled with a bunch of debt?
Ellen
The first thing is you have to have a goal in mind. Having a goal at the end is important. I see so many high school students, they go to college and they don’t know why they’re even going to college. They don’t know what they want to major in and they have no idea how they’re going to pay for it. They figure that’s what everyone does, so that’s what they’re going to do. The first step for me is what’s the goal? Do you have a career in mind? Do you have a job in mind that you would like to do? The college world tells us that you go to college and you figured out in college. We like to work with high school students and families and help them figure out what is their student good at, what are they interested in and how can we help them figure out what works best for them in high school so that, that way when they get to college, they have a roadmap, they have a plan and they know where they’re going. They know why they’re going there, and it gives them so much more motivation to finish. Not just in four years, but early.
Dustin
What if I’m the college kid because I think of myself when I was that age and I had a fascination with computers? Let’s say I’m unsure. I know I’m not going to be the doctor, or the lawyer and I haven’t charted that path. What do you do in that scenario when we’re unsure?
Ellen
A lot of people are unsure but the key to me is you don’t have to chart out the rest of your life. If you’re anything like me, I have had several jobs and even several different fields. To me, it’s what’s the general area that I’m interested in and a job that I’m going to like for the first three or four years after college because hopefully we’re growing and we’re changing and we’re becoming new people. For me, don’t put so much on yourself to find the perfect career and the perfect job and you have to major in the perfect thing. Honestly, it’s more important that you graduate early, that you make sure you get out of college debt free, especially if you’re not interested in the things that you need a lot of schooling for. For example, if you’re going to be a doctor, you should figure that out earlier rather than later and stuff like that.
Most of the careers, you don’t have to even major in that field. It’s more important that you have a better understanding of that. There’s an interesting statistic, over 60% of people don’t work in the field they majored in and just pause for a second. 60% of people aren’t working in their field that they majored in. Is it important? Yes, but to me it’s more important just because you can get out of college so much quicker, faster. Honestly, if you know what you’re going to do, if you take time to figure out who you are, if you interview and shadow people in different fields, you’d be less unsure. For us, it’s important that they don’t go to college unsure. They go to college having tried out so many things and shadowed so many people, so they get a much better picture for that.
Dustin
I definitely want to hear the other steps. I’m going to throw you a curve ball. There’s so much animosity to people being saddled with student loans that a lot of people are skipping. You hear stories of Google saying, “We don’t even care anymore about a resume or a college degree. We don’t care. It’s not as important to us.” What’s your thought about kids not even going to college? Is that a scenario?
Ellen
A lot of people ask me that question and the answer still is that people that go to college end up making more money than people who don’t, whether we like to admit it or not. Most people are still looking at your resume and looking at your college experience and judging you based on that. Regardless of what Google says, if you look at the employees they have, a majority of them have Bachelor’s degrees and a lot of them have Master’s degrees. Maybe in the future that might be true, but for a majority of their careers we’re talking about, you need a college degree especially if you’re going to go into the professional fields. You can’t even get into a professional field unless you have a college degree. To me, it’s a sound bite. As much as it sounds awesome, a majority of the jobs you need a Bachelor’s degree for it to even get looked at.
Dustin
Let’s say going to college, I’ve got a plan for myself. I know what career I want to do. What now is my next step to going that direction?
Ellen
Once you figure out where you’re going, then what we’d like to do with high school students, we try to figure out how do we get college credit in high school. Our goal for all the people we work with is that they have a year of college done before they go. As you can imagine, that saves you so much money, so much time and helps you so much in being successful after college. If you can get out a year ahead, you’re a year ahead of all your peers. You can grow faster and mature faster and all those things. We look at what are some of the ways we can get your Gen Eds done before you go and how we can do that in a cheaper and more efficient way.
Dustin
How does one do that? I vaguely heard of this while as I was going through. What tactically does one do to secure credits ahead of entering the school? Can you take credits that are universally applicable at any college that you finally decided on?
Ellen
The answer is no but yes, a lot of the colleges have similar qualifications, so you can get a good idea of that. It’s another reason why we love the roadmap because if we can help you figure out your major and even the college are going to before you go, we can do a whole lot of work and we can make sure that credits are going to transfer and apply. A couple of different ways we love, there are community colleges. There are the AP tests that you can take, there are club tests that you can take. There are a bunch of different avenues. For us, it’s about sitting down and figuring out what is your student good at? Is your student good at taking tests? Are they good at online programs? Do they want to be in person? All those things have to do with who your students are, what their strengths are and what that roadmap that you’ve created with them on how to get them out of college debt free.
Dustin
You’re hedging. You’re planning your future. You picked up some credits before you get there. What about when you get to school? What are we doing to prevent racking up massive amounts of debt?
Ellen
The number one thing for me is don’t get distracted. Often in college, we sit down with our career counselor people and they’re signing us up for classes and a lot of times they’re trying to be helpful because college is supposed to help you get a well-rounded education and all of these things. Also, the people that are normally career counseling for you, they’re also professors. They love a particular subject. They love a particular thing. For example, just a good story, I love business and I was going to be a business major but I also enjoy English and writing papers. My English professor was trying to get me to switch my major to be an English major and so I took a lot of her classes, but I never took extra classes.
What I see a lot of students do is they get to college and even if they know exactly what they’re going to do, they take a lot of extra classes that they don’t need just because their career counselor told them, “You should check this out.” 70% of college students aren’t graduating in four years and part of the reason is that they’re switching their major a bunch of times once or twice. It doesn’t matter. The later you go to your college career and you start switching careers, you’re losing time, you’re losing money. It’s such a waste to me. My huge advice to college students is don’t switch your major unless you hate it and hopefully you’ve done the work beforehand so you know that you like it. Also, don’t listen to the people that tell you to get to take basket weaving and sign language just because it’s interesting and you should check it out. That’s just adding so much time and money when you can do a lot of those things outside of college for far cheaper.
Dustin
What’s that final key step that’s part of your equation?
Ellen
After you’ve chosen the career path that you want to go on and after you’ve worked hard and got college credits in high school and jumped ahead of getting your GE’s done, then the last one for us is let’s find you some free money. We’re all about scholarships. We’re all about having as many other people pay for your education as possible. Part of it is just being super creative. How can we figure out a way for other people to pay for our college experience? $100 million every year goes unfunded in scholarships, which means there are people offering free money and students not taking advantage of it. There are so many college students that I talked to you that had no idea that there were scholarships available that they missed out on. A lot of people will look at university scholarships but there are so many small scholarships that people think, “I’ll never get that.” There are not that many people applying for them. A huge thing for me is to apply to as many scholarships as you possibly can.
Dustin
Why do you think so many go unfunded?
Ellen
Part of this is in high school, we just don’t think about it, which is why it’s so important that parents get involved. A lot of people think, “This is what I do. I go to college, I get loans, If I get a scholarship, then go me.” Other than that, they don’t even know the options are out there and you have to work hard. Let’s be honest, to get scholarships, you’re going to have to write essays, you might have to interview. Scholarships are hard. The deadlines are weird like they’ll open and close at different times. We’re a huge advocate of having a giant spreadsheet that helps you track the scholarships, make sure you’re applying for them and then choosing the ones that you think you can win.
Dustin
Ellen, I’m thinking back to when I was in this process. Some of my friends ended up telling me that they were making money going to school and not like because they were working. Is there a scenario here? Is there a game here?
Ellen
100%. I went to school with a girl who literally made money and her brother made enough that it qualified as a part time job. I couldn’t believe it. All she did was she found a book on scholarships and she flipped those pages and she just applied to every single one of them and she ended up with 30 scholarships and they were writing her checks at the end of every semester. It’s definitely a possibility. Honestly, I wish I would have done that. I got the trustee scholarship for my school, which was a full ride. I thought, “I just have to pay for books.” It’s not a big deal, maybe some food. I’ve worked hard, I’ve done my due diligence and I met her. I thought, “I missed out on so much money.”
Dustin
Ellen, in doing my research, I came across that you’re not the only member of your family to exit a college debt free. How many members have done this?
Ellen
There are five of us. We’ve all done it each in our own way. We like to say Mike is our prime advocate and prime example because he finished college in two years. Then he got a full ride to law school and he just graduated Valedictorian of his law school, so he crushed it out of the park. We talked to him a lot with other people in and show how he did it. I’m the second oldest of five and every person below me has done it even better. The fun part is we get to learn and see what other siblings were doing, do it our own way but do it better every time.
Dustin
I’m going to ask what’s in the water. Your parents did well. What do you think this stems from?
Ellen
My father, when he went to college, he was the son of a Baptist preacher and I don’t know what you know about Baptist preachers, but a lot of them don’t make very much money. When he was going off to college, his dad handed him a $20 bill and said, “I love you, son. Make good choices in college, have fun.” He went to school with $20 and he gave the $20 to the guy who was giving him a ride to school. If you want to think about it, he showed up was $0. For some reason, he just had this attitude toward debt that he would never get into debt. He was determined to graduate without student loans, so he worked three jobs, he got a track scholarship. He did everything he could to graduate debt free and then he has never taken a penny of debt since then. He’s never had a home mortgage. He’s never had a business loan. He taught us that debt is something that you should fight against. Debt is something that you should do everything in your power to not have. Teaching us how to hack college was important to him.
Dustin
When do people need to start thinking about this process, getting their kids to think this way or themselves doing it?
Ellen
It’s that old saying about the oak tree, “The best time to plant an oak tree was twenty years ago, the best next time is tomorrow.” From the day your kid is born, it would be great if you put money away for their college. If you’re past that, it’s not too late until they’re spring semester of their senior year. By that time, you’ve probably missed it, but we work with a lot of students who are in their sophomore and junior years and were able to accomplish a lot of this by the time they’re done. The best time to me is to get your kid to start thinking about it in eighth grade. When I was in eighth grade, my dad sat me down and he said, “Ellen, up to this point your grades haven’t mattered. Your school involvement hasn’t mattered. Nothing has mattered but the day you start your ninth-grade year, that’s when the grades are counting for scholarships. That’s when the grades are counting for the colleges that you’re able to go to and all those things.” In eighth grade, we sat down and wrote out a plan on how we’re going to graduate debt free.
Dustin
Did he do that with each of the children?
Ellen
Yes.
Dustin
I imagine you are all different and I’m curious as to what you remember of him communicating to you in a way that was profound in the way that made you listen versus a brother or a sister. Any insights there?
Ellen
I like to say he incentivized us. It’s powerful to get your kids incentivized to do this. We advocate whatever money you have set aside for college. If this is something that’s okay with your family, we have the parents sit down and say, “This is how much we’ve saved for college.” It can be $0. It could be $20,000, it could be $50,000. It doesn’t matter. It’s sitting them down and saying, “This is your life. When you graduate college, you’re going to have to take responsibility for your own life. If you’re saddled with a ton of debt, here are the things that are going to happen.” Princeton did a study, students limit their career choices because of the debt they’re in and 33% are taking any job they can get. You meet waitresses and all kinds of people who have Master’s degrees. It’s important. The first thing we do is we sit them down and we say, “This is your life, this is your responsibility. Here’s the money we set aside for college. Whatever is left over, it’s yours.”
It’s something that my dad did, “Here’s how much we saved for you for college,” whatever amount that was. The interesting part was each of us had a different amount. Trying to be as fair as possible, the markets happen in life happen. You just hand him the cards and you say, “What can we do with that?” That gets your kid on board, “How do we do this together?” Then all of a sudden, you’re on the same team and they understand that it’s their career and their life and they’re going to be affected by the choices that they make. A lot of high school students take whatever college they want to because they have no personal responsibility and they don’t care what college they’re going to because their parents are signing the loan documents. Stuff like that is important to set your kid up for success and to incentivize them to take responsibility for their own lives.
Dustin
I imagine with five of the same family members going through college debt free that naturally, people started to ask you or the fam, how did you do it? How’s your process? Is that the story behind what you’re up to now is that people just started asking you?
Ellen
My father runs a wealth management firm in California and then we also have a branch in North Carolina. Part of it came because as our wealth management clients had sons and daughters that were getting ready for college, we’d sit them down and we’d say, “Here’s how we did it. Here’s everything that we’ve done.” Those meetings are shorter than we’d like them to be. Usually, we’d only get an hour or two to go through everything we’re talking about. They would always say, “This is great but an hour or two, we’d love more.” We started to set it down, started recording videos, started writing templates and hopefully creating this whole experience for people. That way, they don’t have to be wealth management clients to help understand how to get their kids out debt free.
Dustin
How has been the reception so far, just pivoting and running this as a separate thing?
Ellen
It’s been amazing. I do weekly calls with the clients we have that are in the program and we have so much fun. We talk about all sorts of things and it’s interesting because at first the parents are excited because they were trying to help their kid get out of college debt free and they understand quicker. What’s been fun for me is to see the high school students start understanding, “This is getting me ahead. Look at all the things I’m able to do and how I’m creating this roadmap for my life and how I’m going to get out early and provide value and all this.” Watching the high school students get excited about it has been fun. Also seeing the interaction between the parents and the kids. It’s seeing their relationship even get stronger as they work together and be on the same team. A lot of times, high school students and their parents, they’re not always on the same team, if you know what I mean.
Dustin
I’m curious because this is a newer venture and you’ve been sharing this with your wealth management clients for a while. You run this as its own separate thing. What has been an interesting thing to learn about starting this up as a business?
Ellen
When we started this out, we thought in the financial terms, in the sense that we wanted to help students get out debt free. We wanted them not to have this burden. We wanted them to be able to enjoy the exciting opportunities that life has to offer. We focused on this whole money aspect. What’s been fun is to see that the most powerful thing is seeing parents and understanding that parents, as much as money, is a big part of this. What’s even bigger is seeing their students become successful individuals because what we found from doing this program is when you go through all the stuff that I’m talking about, when you start developing roadmaps for your life, when you start understanding how finances are going to play into things, when you take responsibility for your own path in life, the kids just start getting so much more mature. I don’t know how to say it but watching parents be able to be a part of their students growing and maturing and becoming successful, responsible adults, has been cool. That’s something that I hoped for but I wasn’t sure if it would come across. Seeing that financial thing is awesome but even more important is helping parents help their high school students become successful adults in life.
Dustin
What’s the biggest obstacle you faced with this?
Ellen
It’s something that isn’t on people’s radars. I don’t even know that they know it exists because I haven’t even heard of it. You can hire college career counselors and people to do one-on-one stuff with you but trying to get them to understand that it’s a big picture thing and there are a lot of pieces that go into it. The biggest obstacles when I talk to people is they get it, but they don’t see the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. Then once you get into it, then they get to see and it’s exciting. That would be the biggest obstacle. They’re like, “What? I’ve never heard of this before.”
Dustin
I saw the TEDx Talk and I’m always curious because of my speaking background. What prompted you to do a TEDx Talk? What’s the story there?
Ellen
That was fun. If you ever get a chance to do a TEDx Talk, I highly recommend it. The story behind that was I love to speak and I love to get on stage just because I love to teach people. I love to help people get to the next step in life. I’m a goal-oriented people person. Anytime I get the chance to help someone reach their next goal or the next step in life, I’m all for it. The TEDx came to Wilmington and I had a couple of friends. I’m involved in the business community here and I had a couple of friends who were on the committee to pick speakers and so they came to me and said, “Ellen, we need speakers. We know you have to be on the stage.” I was like, “I don’t know what to talk about. I don’t have a topic.” They looked at me and they’re like, “You’ll figure it out. We’re putting you on the speaker list, figure out your topic, we’re going to get you up there.”
Dustin
What was the journey like in preparing and finding a topic?
Ellen
I had to dig deep. I wanted to be personal, something that affected me. I’m very goal-oriented and so I struggled with that whole, “How do I keep wanting to achieve but yet find contentment in the present?” That’s a big thing for entrepreneurs and people that are motivated, “How do we stay motivated, stay goal oriented but yet enjoy the present?” My journey through finding that was important to me and I was hoping it would help people. I put that talk together to speak from my own experiences and try to help people that are more similar to me. That was good but definitely I was so nervous beforehand and it was crazy. The TEDx people are amazing. They give you speaker coaches and I got to interact and connect with a lot of the other speakers. It ended up being an amazing experience.
Dustin
You serve on the Board of the Cape Fear Women in Tech. What is that and how has that helped you on your career with your business?
Ellen
Cape Fear Women in Tech was started by two of my good friends in tech. When we started it, there weren’t a lot of women in tech and so part of it was how do we connect, create a community of women in tech, how do we support them and encourage them and offer them a platform to share their gifts. We do a lot of outreach to middle schoolers and high schoolers, and also how to connect them with each other so they can support and encourage one another. It was a giveback and I give to them and it’s been a neat experience.
Dustin
I want to move us into WealthFit round and that’s our rapid-fire questions here at Get WealthFit. What’s been your most worthwhile investment in life?
Ellen
I am a huge advocate of self-improvement in the sense that the best investment you can make is in yourself, meaning investing in learning and growing and being part of communities and networks that shape you and mold you. As much as I focus on formal education, the colleges and the high schools and even the certifications I’ve gotten, it’s so important to keep learning, to keep growing and keep taking courses. I am a course junkie. I’ve taken a million courses and that’s because I always want to keep learning. I never want to be stagnant. I never want to stay set static. In this day and age, it’s so important that you continue your education either formally or informally, but take it into your hands and run with it.
Dustin
I’m curious to know what’s your guilty pleasure spend? What’s your splurge?
Ellen
My guilty pleasure splurge is easy. I love to travel. I travel all the time, mostly for fun, some for work but mostly for fun. Getting outside of your own community and your own life and seeing something from someone else’s perspective is so important. I’ve traveled a lot of the world already. Also, inside the states a lot. It’s important to get out and see the world.
Dustin
What’s been a place that’s surprised you on your travels?
Ellen
One of the most beautiful places I’ve been is Fiji. I got to snorkel in Rainbow Reef. That was an amazing opportunity. I went to South Africa. South Africa is interesting because even politically right now they have a lot going on. It’s interesting to be a part of the places instead of reading about them. Just an example, I spent a couple months in Israel and being in Israel makes you get a better feeling for what’s happening in the Middle East and all that. Instead of just reading about things in the newspaper and taking people’s word for it, get out there and see what’s going on in the world. People laugh, they say don’t ask other countries about politics and religion and so that’s all I ask people about because I just love to know it. Ireland, I had asked them about their politics and their religion and South Africa and even Fiji too. It’s fun to see what people say and hear from their own perspective.
Dustin
How has a failure set you up for later success in life?
Ellen
I consider this a huge failure. I had graduated good grades and I love my major. I thought I’m going to land the best job in the whole world. This is what all graduates think. I could not find a job for four months. I searched, I couldn’t find one when I graduated in 2011, not exactly the best job environment. I ended up selling insurance door-to-door. I’m not lying to you. I knocked on business doors and I tried to sell them insurance and it was the hardest thing I’ve ever done. Every day I woke up, there’s this pit in my stomach thinking I will never be able to do this tomorrow. What was interesting about that was once you sell insurance door to door, nothing in business scares you. You’re like, “I have to get on a podcast, that’s easy. I get to talk to people, no worries.” If I can knock on a business door, then I can do anything. It was funny because the next job I got, they looked at my resume and they said, “You sold insurance door-to-door? You can do anything.” I thought, “Can I? Maybe I can.”
Dustin
Would you feel overwhelmed or unfocused or maybe off the path essentially? What do you do to get yourself back in line?
Ellen
I’m a religious person. When I am feeling off focus or whatever, I’ll spend time with some of my friends that center me and help me understand. Sometimes I pray. Just being in a community is so important to encourage you and uplift you in those times, whether it’s a group of entrepreneurs who know your goals and are excited about them and keep you on track or a group of friends, especially in my family. My family and I are close. We encourage and support one another. If we’re ever feeling down, we can always find a sibling or a parent that can talk some sense into us and get us back on the right track. For me, it’s about community, whether that’s church or family or friends or even the entrepreneurial community in Wilmington. We have a unique community and it’s fun to be a part of and see us encouraging and supporting one another.
Dustin
In the last five years, what new belief, behavior or habit has improved your life the most?
Ellen
I have gotten into minimalism. I’m a huge advocate. I’m not extreme or excessive but for example, I clean my desk off today and I have nothing on my desk. Removing distractions from my life, whether it’s extra stuff or things on my desk or all of that has been beneficial to me to look around and see all this stuff and realize that’s not what matters. I want to add value to the world. I want to be a contributor. I want to be a good friend, I want to be a good family member. That’s more important than the stuff around me. I live in Wilmington and we had a huge hurricane. If there is anything to remind you that stuff doesn’t matter as much as you think it does, it’s a hurricane. That’s been big in my life, to refocus me and helped my discipline even in my habits on the things that matter.
Dustin
Who or what has turned you onto minimalism?
Ellen
I follow Mr. Money Mustache for some financial. I loved his style. He’s hilarious. Tim Ferriss, I listen to a lot of his podcast and even Ramit Sethi, he’s not exactly a minimalist, but he’s very much a productivity, self-improvement kind of guy. I follow a lot of the people in that crowd. They turned me onto that.
Dustin
What are your three favorite books right now?
Ellen
Essentialism, that one’s a great one. I love anything by Seth Godin, he’s amazing. Purple Cow is an awesome book. I love Tim Ferriss’ book, so I love The 4-Hour Work Week. Anything that you can have processes and procedures in place so that you can go enjoy life and travel, I’m into.
Dustin
Ellen, thank you big time for being on the show. We appreciated having you. If folks want to go deeper with Exit College Debt Free and just stay in touch with what you’re up to in the world, how can they do that?
Ellen
They can get our website, www.ExitCollegeDebtFree.com. I have a Facebook page as well, but they can find that through the website. I encourage them to go and check it out. My Facebook page has a bunch of stuff, more videos and testimonials and all kinds of stuff.
Dustin
We’ll definitely go check those out. Ellen, thank you big time for being on the show.
Ellen
Thanks so much. Have a good one.

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The Ultimate Guide To Making, Spending, Saving, and Investing Money

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Rich Dad Advisor and wealth education innovator Tom Wheelwright on reducing your taxes by 10%-40% & how to deal with financial advisors.

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Retire Early, Retire Happy

It’s good to retire early—but it's also important to retire HAPPY. Learn how to retire early and happy with Wes Moss.

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How to Get Out of Debt, Boost Your Active Income, and Start Investing for Passive Income

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Have you heard about the FI movement? Jonathan Mendonsa on how budgeting and smart investing can lead you to financial independence.

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Cutting the Cable

What’s the cable cutting movement all about? Cable Cutting Academy's Jeremy Edmonds discusses tech and finance hacks to save you money.

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How to Write A Goodwill Letter That WORKS [Templates Included]

Is a late payment hurting your credit score? There's good news: you write a goodwill letter and ask the creditor to take it off your credit history.

How to Write A Goodwill Letter That WORKS [Templates Included]

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Paying the mortgage with a credit card is becoming a more popular strategy. But is it a good strategy?

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Want to boost your salary? Rich Jones and Marcus Garrett help you determine your financial worth. Negotiate for the life you deserve.

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How to Buy Car Insurance & Get The Best Deal

If you don’t know what your car insurance plan covers—now’s the time to find out. You’ll be surprised by how much you can save.

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Cut the Cable (Bill) - 10 Alternatives to Cable Television

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Budgets for the Service Industry: How to Budget When You Work for Tips

Learn how to budget when you work for tips. How to take control of your finances in the service industry.

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