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Jeff Gross: Title Insurance Explained

Our guest has been working in all facets of the title industry including residential, commercial, underwriting, sales, marketing and has managed several territories. He is a true veteran and expert in his area. His name is Jeff Gross.

We are explaining everything that you could want to know about title insurance including easements and if you don't understand certain things when it comes to buying your first home or investing in residential or commercial properties, how that could creep up on you and delay your deal and your closing.

We start this episode with a very fascinating scenario that you're going to want to know. For those of you that are investing in properties, we talk about how to speed up the closing and the things that you need to know or understand to make sure that your deal closes with speed.

With that said, let's get to it.

Dustin
Jeff, a good friend approaches you not quite knowing exactly what you do. She tells you her story about sharing a driveway with a good neighbor for many years. When that neighbor sells the house, decides to cut out that shared driveway, break it up and erect a fence. I can see this getting tricky and crazy. What do you advise your friend to do and how do you help her get out of this situation?
Jeff
It's an interesting story. It's one of those things that could happen to anyone and no one ever thinks about it until they're in that situation. In this case, there was a shared driveway with a couple of neighbors who got along great. They shared the driveway for many years. They would each pull down the driveway and then turn into their own respective garages. However, one neighbor decides to move. A new person buys the lot and is going to tear the house down and build a new one. The person looks at the lot lines and believes that they own most of the driveway. He rips it up, puts in a fence and is starting to incorporate that into their new house.
My friend is distraught. She now doesn't have a full driveway. She only has a little sliver, which isn't wide enough for her van that's set up to transport her disabled child that has to get to the doctor and things. She can't even get to the house to get her disabled child into the van. She's pretty distraught. This is a huge and possibly expensive problem. We do some research for her and we determine that although the neighbor does own most of that driveway, all but the four feet or so, she has a valid easement which hadn't been uncovered. It's been recorded. She has the rights to that driveway as it existed when she purchased the house and as she's been using for the last however many years. When that's brought up to the neighbor, the title company steps in and file suit and this gets resolved. The neighbor now has to replace the driveway and grant her access.
Even though the neighbor technically owns that property, she has a right to that driveway as it was when she purchased it. For her case, all is well and ends well although that was a huge hassle. Fortunately, she wasn't out the expense of the lawsuit to get the neighbor to fix it. The interesting thing with this on the follow-up is the neighbor now is at a bit of a loss. The neighbor who thought they owned up to that line and could do whatever they want with their property, build on it or tear up a driveway or put a fence or whatever, now have realized that my friend has an easement. They can't do what they originally thought with their property. They now have a title claim. They should be talking to their title company about how do we made whole since they can't do with the property exactly what they originally planned to do.
Dustin
I find this fascinating and I want to dive into this world but first, you should define easement for those that don't understand this word. How is it possible that the neighbor owned the land, yet your friend had the right or this easement to use someone else's land? How does that even happen?
Jeff
It's incredibly common. All properties pretty much have easements on them. The most common one would be for power lines and sewers. If you look out your front window, you may have a fire hydrant or electrical line running along your property. The power company or the electric company got an easement, meaning they have a right to enter your property to access that to make repairs. You can't build a fence around it and prevent them from doing that thing. That was the case with this driveway, the neighbors long ago had an agreement to share that property. Even though one party may own it, they don't have complete 100% rights to shut off the rest of the world from it. They still have to allow access or whatever use was originally agreed for the betterment of the neighbor on the property.
Dustin
I definitely want to get into it but I want to take a step back. You went to the University of Iowa for Finance and then you got your Law degree at Drake. How did pursuing Finance and Law lead you into this world of title insurance and mitigating people's risks when they buy properties?
Jeff
Title insurance is a niche industry. I happened to get a summer job with a mortgage company between high school and college. While my friends were lifeguarding and doing other fun things, I was sitting at a desk back in the ‘80s. I remember there was a huge refi boom that summer because interest rates had been lowered to 12%. I was getting my feet wet on the lending side of the business. After doing that a couple of summers, I got another opportunity to spend a couple of summers working at a title company helping with closings, running errands, getting documents recorded and one thing led to another. When I got out of law school, I had a tiny bit of experience in the title business, which was a lot more than most people coming out of school have. I got an opportunity to work for Chicago Title and many years later, I'm still doing it.
Dustin
It's one thing to get your feet wet, get some experience and get your foot in the door. Something must fascinate you in order to stick around for many years. In your day-to-day or over the years that you've progressed in doing what you do, what's kept your attention? What fascinates you about this line of work?
Jeff
Not only is it a great company and there are a lot of opportunities within the company. The industry itself is fascinating to me. It's a very niche industry. It requires an incredible amount of training and expertise. On top of that, it's always changing. Just when you think you've got it figured out, the law changes or the rule changes. Just when you've learned how to do a closing in California, now you have another deal in North Dakota and then tomorrow you have one in New York. There's so much variety that every day is a little different. The nice thing is many years later, I'm still learning every day.
Dustin
I'm curious as to what has surprised you about this industry. I can imagine the law is changing, learning about new states and how they conduct business is surprising. What has been surprising to you about this, something that you hadn’t anticipated or something that maybe others don't know about this line of work or this industry that they might find a little shocking or surprising?
Jeff
It's a fun business to be in. It's competitive. There are some large Fortune 200, 300 companies in the business and there are thousands of other what we call agents. To the consumer on the street or the attorney out there who may be selecting one, they all seem the same, when the reality is they're incredibly different both in the way they're set up, the way they handle things, the responsiveness and all of that stuff. There are a lot of different factors to compete for business. It's fun in that regard trying to grow your business, get new customers and still keep up with the ever-changing demands of the marketplace, especially in these real estate surges that we've experienced for quite some time.
Dustin
I want to make sure I've got this right so our audience can fully understand. Jeff, is it fair to say you essentially mitigate risk and help bring deals to closing and you do this through effective title searches and by providing insurance? Is that correct?
Jeff
You use the word, mitigate. It's a great word, but I'd say we eliminate the risk for the parties. We do title research. We look at all the histories of the properties. Sometimes we make some educated guesses and then we apply our expertise and all our knowledge about the various local laws, customs and practices. We can eliminate the risk for buyers and lenders. In doing so, we mitigate our own risk. We can never get our risk to zero, but we try to minimize it as much as possible. If there ever is a loss, a claim or a surprise pops up, the lender or the owner won't have any risk. They call us and then we handle it, so they're off the hook.
Dustin
Let's define this. We've been dancing around it. Essentially, when someone buys a property you are reducing that risk. You are eliminating that risk. There is still a risk to the company that provides that insurance, but you might have a better definition. What exactly is title insurance? How would you define it?
Jeff
Keeping it short, title insurance is a protection to the buyer or their lender against alternate claims of ownership and use, protection against possible liens or any other rights that may arise that conflict with the intended use or enjoyment of that owner.
Dustin
We kicked off this interview with the crazy story about your friend and her neighbor with easements and you talked about liens. What are some other things that people might not know about or might not consider when they say, “I want to buy this home, I want to buy this commercial property?” What are some of the things that loom large out there that are potentially dangerous if one does not move forward on a search or insurance?
Jeff
The residential and commercial are very similar in that regard. Commercial may have a wider variety of possible things that could pop up and cause a problem. On the residential side, I would certainly include things like special assessments from a neighborhood or a condo association. A lot of times, a buyer doesn't know about that and six months later, he gets a bill. A missed mortgage is the most obvious one or any other type of recorded lien that's on the property. Those things run with the land. The new owner is on the hook for paying off the previous owner's mortgage if in fact, it doesn't get paid at the time of the transfer. That can be pretty costly and is a big surprise.
The other main thing would be mechanics lien issues such as unpaid bills for home improvements. If the previous owner of whether it's a house or an office building had a new roof put on and the contractor who handled that or the suppliers who furnished the supplies weren't fully paid, they have a right to seek payment from the new owner. They can go as far to even foreclose on the property in order to get payments. As a new owner, you want to make sure you're aware of all those things. Make sure that the title insurance company is promising to you that those are paid off. If any of them surprise us and pop up, they'll take care of it and it's not your problem.
Dustin
I want to make sure I fully understand this. Let's say I buy a property and I don't do title search or I don't have title insurance and there is an existing lien on the property from the previous owner. I, now as the new owner, am liable for that?
Jeff
Absolutely. The most common one we're seeing or we've started to see is HELOCs or Home Equity Line of Credit. We've had cases where a seller is heading to the closing and they draw $100,000 down on their HELOC on the way to the closing. We either didn't know that was drawn down or we didn't even know it existed. We didn't make sure it was closed, paid off and shut down at the closing table. The buyer finds out three months later that they're getting foreclosure notices because that mortgage hasn't been paid. That's a big risk and that's one that most buyers don't want to assume and most lenders will not allow their buyers to assume. Those are the things that we're scrambling to clear up at the closing table. We make sure we're aware of all the mortgages. We're responsible for getting them all paid down to zero. The HELOC case, we needed to make sure that it's closed.
Dustin
Jeff, the other side of this would be I do close on a new property. I did title insurance, a title search. I hired a company to do that. Let's say that HELOC or that unforeseen mortgage pops up. Because I bought that insurance and let's say the team did not find it, the company did not find it, I am not liable for this $100,000 or $200 million potential looming mortgage or HELOC that's out there. Is that correct?
Jeff
That's the purpose of your insurance. You can rest easy. If that someone knocks on your door and says, “You can't use this driveway or you owe this money on this mortgage,” you just call your title company and they should make you whole and fix it for you.
Dustin
My understanding of this world is that you can't do a deal. I didn't know if it was the law or it's just isn't how business is done anymore. My understanding is that you have to have title insurance. You have to do a title search as part of the process. Am I mistaken in that? Are people still doing deals without getting insurance?
Jeff
They're not. There's no real law that says you have to have it but it's wise. It's awfully risky to buy a piece of property and not do the search to uncover what liens may be recorded or the title insurance to cover you against anything you may miss in that search or against any other type of fraud or anything that may have occurred, so the title search wouldn't be accurate. Getting insurances is a no-brainer and it's not relative to the size of the loss or the size of the risk. It's money well spent.
Dustin
Let's say I close on a property, whether that's residential or commercial, we're speaking in generalities at this point. Many years later, something is discovered. What happens is nothing was found and everything goes through, but then a new owner or something happens, I go to sell that property and then something pops up. Would the title insurance company be on the hook at that point if something was found?
Jeff
It depends, but this is a good chance to explain the difference between title insurance and other types of insurance. Title insurance, you pay a onetime fee to insure your rights in the property up to a certain point. That's the point you purchased or took out the loan on the property. Other insurance like auto insurance or health insurance, you're paying continuing premiums every year. They run subsequent to the time you bought your house or your car. They continue up until the date of the end of your policy, which is sometime in the future. Title insurance looks back while all these others are current and looking forward. In your example of something pops up years later, my answer is it depends on whether that was a lien, a tax or a missed mortgage that had occurred prior to the point you bought the title insurance when you bought your house or is that something that's happened subsequent to that time? Maybe someone else took out a lien on your property after you purchased it. If that's the case, then you wouldn't be covered. Anything up to the point of your title policy, you should be covered.
Dustin
Jeff, I would like for you to explain the process, specifically what I'm thinking of is an escrow. I know a lot of people are unfamiliar with that or they have misconceptions about the process. I want you to define the process, how this looks and where escrow fits into that picture.
Jeff
Escrow is a confusing term for many and I can maybe break it down pretty simply. Escrow is the closing piece. It's the transfer of not just the house and the deed, but the money, funds, keys, liens, documents, everything. We analogize it in our industry with pretending you're all sitting around a table with a big salad bowl in the middle. You've got buyers, sellers, realtors, attorneys, lender, you may have people who were getting paid out, the previous lender. Those types of people are all sitting around and what everyone does under the guidance of the title company who's running the show in this case, everyone has a list of things that they need that they expect to get out of this bowl when the deal closes. Everyone has a list of requirements of things that need to put in.
For example, the lender is probably putting in a significant piece of money or a piece of change. They're getting out a mortgage. They're getting their documents all signed and recorded. They're getting a lender's insurance policy to make sure they have a first lien position. The seller is getting money back, but the seller is also having to pay off their previous liens, their mortgage and things like that. The sellers are putting the keys in the bowl. The buyer, the attorney, the realtors all have things they're getting and submitting. What the title company's job as part of this escrow is to collect everything into escrow or into this big bowl. When everything has been deposited, all the money, documents, forms, tax forms, keys, lien, payoff, letters, whatever, into the salad bowl, the title company then sorts through and redistributes it so everybody walks away with what they're supposed to get.
The nice thing about that is if the buyer gets home or two years later realizes they didn't get what they were supposed to get, they don't have to track down the seller, the surveyor or anyone like that. They just go to the title company and say, “Here's what I put in. Here's what I was supposed to get out. I didn't get it, make me whole.” All the parties have one person and one place to go back to. They don't have to track each other down. That's what makes the transaction goes a little more smoothly. It keeps the real estate market liquid. People have this comfort level to go ahead and make the exchange because they're not going to have to track somebody down that they can't find years later. They go back to the title company.
Dustin
One of the things I wanted to ask you about is everyone's excited about the close, the transfer and deals getting done. You've been at this for many years. I'm curious as to what things you've witnessed and experienced with delaying the sale or closing and what people can do about it? What can investors, buyers, people involved in the party do before even heading into the closing? Is there anything that they can do to influence it to ensure that their deal goes through in a timely fashion?
Jeff
There are frequent delays and it's usually user error. Everyone hates to point to someone and point blame, but it's most often because the title commitment is prepared. That's a search of the property that lists all the liens, all the possible issues that should list easements that we talked about. Oftentimes, what happened is someone doesn't look at that until the day of or the day before the closing. They realize, “I didn't realize that. I need to get a payoff from the second mortgage. I haven't gotten that yet. It's going to take a couple of weeks. I didn't realize that this surveyor had a question about this landmark and whether or not it's part that should be included in part of the property. I need to get back to the surveyor.”
The surveyor needs to go out and re-look at the property and finish off the survey. There are a lot of those types of things that with a little diligence and communication, everything can come together. In this busy world, people have multiple deals going on, realtors and attorneys are swamped, and people are buying and selling. They have a lot of things on their mind. It happens. A lot of times people show up that morning or call the day before and say, “I didn't do this. How can you help me?” That's where we try to get creative and try to work through things. Delays often result because of things like that.
Dustin
This may be out to the left field. I don't know why, but sometimes things pop into my head. This eminent domain has popped into my head because we're talking about easements. It’s rarely do I get an opportunity to talk to an individual like you who's been doing this for quite some time. You can do all this due diligence. You can check all the boxes and everything. Have you ever experienced something like that where a municipality or government says, “You do own the rights to this land but for eminent domain or for the sake of the public, we're going to come in?”
Jeff
It happens. Every day on your way to work, you probably slowed down a little bit because there's some road construction going on. Imagine if they're widening the highway or they're adding a lane or a passing lane or something in there. Someone owned that grass on the side of the properties. If they're now expanding the road, that could be someone's front yard, it could be the boulevard, it could be a side yard if they're expanding an alley. All that stuff goes into play. Eminent domain is what the government uses in order to claim that property for the right of the common good of the people, rather than letting each individual negotiate on how they're going to sell or what they're going to get in exchange for that slice of the property so they can widen the road.
Dustin
How does that affect the title when you see that? Is that something like before it was there and now it's not? How does that play into your world?
Jeff
It's hard to beat Uncle Sam. If they've done everything correctly and they normally have, then either that strip of land may still be owned by the individual with an easement now in place for the use of the government or maybe an eminent domain. Often, there's a taking and there's a title transfer of whatever we're talking about a ten-foot strip of land for the government. There isn't a lot of negotiation in there. We just need to make sure everything was done right and it's properly delineated as to what the boundaries are and everything.
Dustin
I’m glad I asked because it's not every day you get to have a conversation about eminent domain. Jeff, I know that your primary area of focus is with commercial properties, regardless, you're an expert on both sides. How does title insurance differ from residential versus commercial?
Jeff
The title insurance itself is specific. The coverages in the policy are specific to the type of property that uses the layout and all that. The residential is considered just 1 to 4 family. If you're buying a condo, a house, a two-flat or something like that, that's residential. Commercial encompasses pretty much everything else. That's the office buildings and apartment buildings. It includes agricultural, mixed-use, assisted living, coal mines and forest lands. There's a wide variety of commercial properties out there.
The biggest difference in the whole transaction part is the commercial properties have a pretty high level of sophistication. There's a frequency. There aren't many people who are buying and selling commercial property one time. They're often frequent traders in the property. The residential side is different. It's usually the buyer’s most important transaction of their life. It's their life savings. It's emotional and important. It's something we need to do right and make them feel comfortable about. The parties aren't as sophisticated. They don't have high-level attorneys helping them. They haven't been doing this their whole lives and doing it multiple times. There's definitely a different feeling and a different approach to handling the purchase of someone's dream home versus someone buying their ninth retail strip mall in the third different town in which they purchased.
Dustin
I want to talk about geography a little bit and I know it's hard to give such a specific answer in a format like this. We've got people tuning in from all over the country. I think of California where we're at and Florida where I used to live. I know you're in the Northwest up there or Northeast. How does geography play into it? Is every state different? Does every company have to accommodate every state? What should people know here?
Jeff
The big picture, it's the same but the way they effectuate things is a little different. The processes are different. It just comes down to custom on how things are handled, whether it's people sending things in FedEx or people get together on a table and sign documents. There are different ways to handle the closing and the laws differ. The most significant law that differs from state to state would probably be regarding mechanics liens. That's what I was referring to when I talked about where the seller has the roof fixed and doesn't pay or gets into a dispute with the contractor.
You buy the house and find out this contractor has a dispute and hasn't been paid. There are a variety of laws that allow for different timings for this thing to occur. In some states, the contractor who fixed the roof must have filed a lien and that would be a public record. In other states, he may have 90 days or 180 days, whatever X amount of time in order to file the lien, so nobody would know about it. Title insurance would have to kick in and cover that. In those cases, the title company is probably going to ask a lot more questions, “Were there any home repairs done lately? Let's see the bills, let's see the receipt.” That type of stuff. The coverages and the way the title company will mitigate the risk is going to differ from state to state based on those state’s requirements on how they cover various liens.
Dustin
You have been at this for quite some time and I'm sure to you, this is all rote now. It's pretty standard even though the laws change. I'm curious to know which is the trickiest state. Which has been the state that you're like, “That's interesting, that's fascinating?” What state in the union would you say that one is?
Jeff
When it comes to the construction laws and the mechanics lien issues, it's Illinois. It’s very challenging there and very protective of the claim into. It's difficult from a title perspective. It takes a lot of paperwork and a lot of questions in order to make sure everything's safe to transfer the property in Illinois. Other states like in New York City, the boroughs handle things differently than they do in the rest of the state as far as transfer documentation and things required in order to record documents. There are many different nuances. The laws may be different from state to state, but the nuances from county to county are amazingly different and constantly changing. That's our job when we're doing commercial closings all over the country is to try to keep up. We're fortunate that we have a network of offices and agents in pretty much every county. We have great resources we can ask, “What do we need to do to get this deal closed? What's changed since the last time we did a deal in Louisiana or in Texas?”
Dustin
Would you say technology has made this easier or has complicated this in the process?
Jeff
It's made things easier. The transfer of knowledge and the way to fix errors, all that is much quicker. Along those lines, the expectations have grown commensurately. Everybody wants something done now or even yesterday. They expect you to be able to do it and expect you to respond immediately, the email and all that. It's probably not like most industries where we're getting a lot more done. We don't seem like we have any more time in the day to do other things. You're doing more and you're doing it more efficiently. The expectations are that you keep up that pace.
Dustin
I imagine the number of people and labor it took before courthouses made records available online. Do you still employ a lot of people and prefer to pull paper records to make sure everything's there or is everything automated? Is everything available online or on the internet that you're able to leverage that?
Jeff
That's where our industry struggles. More and more are becoming available online but not everything is online. We still need boots on the ground to pull old books and do some research. That's probably one of the biggest concerns that the people in our industry have about the future of our industry is there aren't enough people to do that. There are not many kids coming out of high school or college who want to be title searchers are even aware of that. We're having a real problem, especially in some rural and more remote counties, finding people to take over the business when the local title searcher has been doing it for 40 years and he's going to retire. We're finding it harder and harder to get people to step up and search in those counties. We need to pay people more to drive across the state to go into other counties. There's been a shortage of that type of talent. To answer your question, we need fewer of them. They seem to be leaving the industry at a faster rate than we can replace the ones we need. It’s a problem.
Dustin
That could be a side hustle or a potential career for those reading to get ideas and new opportunities. Thank you for shedding the light.
Jeff
It's a great way to learn. A lot of the people here that have been doing this for 20 to 30 years on the underwriting side are handling escrows. They make a great living and they offer an incredibly valuable service. Many of them started as a title searcher as a summer job or a couple of years out of school while they were figuring out what they wanted to do. It's an incredible way to build your foundation and your understanding of the industry.
Dustin
We covered quite a gamut here explaining some of the stories, defining what title insurance is and universally in every transaction this is required. Have we left anything out? I also want to add in this, if people have some say in the process in terms of who they're going to go seek out for title insurance, what do they need to know about vetting companies?
Jeff
We're a B2B industry, meaning that different locations or different states have different practices, but it's generally not the consumer who's going to pick the title company. It's their attorney or their lender with a realtor. In many of the residential instances, it would be wise for them to understand that and to ask their realtor or whoever is selecting, “Why did you pick so-and-so? What's your relationship? Have you used them before? Is there anyone else that's closer or anyone else I should consider?” Those types of things. Generally, there’s so much going on with a real estate transaction. That's why you rely on those people to pick the vendor that's going to take the best care of you and give you the best service at the fair price. A lot of times, people show up at the closing for the first time and they'd never even heard of title insurance before. They don't even know why they're at this crazy company that they've never heard of.
Maybe asking some questions earlier in the process about, “When do I sign the documents? Where do I sign the documents? How does that piece work?” For a lot of people, purchasing your first house is such a big investment. There are so much stress and pressure. You don't know what you don't know. You just roll with it and you trust your realtor and your attorney. Things usually work out all right, but there are definitely surprises along the way for those people to the extent they do any research and ask the most questions in advance. It might ease some of the stress of the closing day.
Dustin
It’s funny how you painted that picture of showing up to an office or showing up to a title company and not being akin to the whole transaction having the realtor and the parties dictate. I saw myself there at my first house that I had purchased and it went exactly as you described. I could have been more proactive in the conversation. That's all we did is bring that awareness of being more proactive, whether you're buying your first house, an investment property or maybe you're in the commercial. It's incredibly valuable to have an understanding of all the parties involved and what's taking place.
Jeff
I went to college. I went to law school. I worked for title companies and mortgage companies in the summer. I got a job as an attorney at Chicago Title, which has since become part of the Fidelity Family and worked there for a few years. When I went to buy my first little condo, I learned more in that process of me actually making a purchase than I had learned in the multiple years I've been in the industry prior to that. I was asking questions every day of things that I probably should have known or thought I would have known having worked in the business. When it's your own property and you dig in, you learn so much. I should say everyone that we hire would be a much better employee if they've already purchased a piece of properties
Dustin
That goes to the power of getting in. Just because you read a book or maybe even work in the industry, nothing is more personal than when you have to do it or you're involved in this situation. That’s a very good point. Jeff, I appreciate you showcasing and let us on the inside of this world and sharing your wisdom and experiences. If for whatever reason someone reading this interview would like to get ahold of you, maybe has a question or two or can be pointed in the right direction in terms of being more proactive in this process, what's the best way for people to do so?
Jeff
I'm one of those people that's on my email all the time. I'll give you that. It's Jeff.Gross@FNF.com. I'd love to hear from anybody. If I can't answer the question quickly or succinctly, I'm happy to connect you to the right person who can.
Dustin
I appreciate it. I imagine you're going to get a question or two about some weird easement. It probably won't be weird to you because you've almost seen it all but to me, it would definitely be one of those unique stories like we started the interview off with. Thank you for being on the show. Thanks for sharing your wisdom and the ability to connect with you because we do have a great community that thrives under educating themselves and taking action. Thank you for everything and thank you for what you're up to in the world.
Jeff
You're welcome and thanks for having me.

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Behind-the-Scenes on 2 Successful Wholesale Deals

WealthFit Trainers

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Real Estate Fix & Flip Showcase

Real Estate Fix & Flip Showcase

Behind-the-Scenes on 13 Successful Rehab Projects

WealthFit Trainers

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The 7-Figure Landlord

The 7-Figure Landlord

3 Keys to Building A Portfolio of 500+ Cash Flow Properties

Gregg Cohen

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Facebook Messenger Marketing

Facebook Messenger Marketing

How To Find Your Next Great Investment Property on Big Blue

Bob McIntosh

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Facebook Live Marketing

Facebook Live Marketing

How to Exponentially Increase Your Number of Leads Using Facebook Live

Bob McIntosh

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podcast
Risk, Reinvention, & The $50 Million Dollar House

Frank McKinney shares how he went from from small town troublemaker to real estate rockstar using the power of “the healthy ego.”

Risk, Reinvention, & The $50 Million Dollar House

podcast
Secrets of a "Financial Concierge"

Anything can happen in the world of finance. Travis Jennings teaches you to use the tools at your disposal to make (and keep) your fortune.

Secrets of a "Financial Concierge"

article
What's the Difference Between Naked Options & Covered Options?

What are the differences between naked and covered options? If you're an investor, you need to know how to use either (or both) correctly.

What's the Difference Between Naked Options & Covered Options?

Justin McCormick

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article
The Short & Simple Guide to Employee Stock Options

What are employee stock options and how do you use them? It's simpler than you might think.

The Short & Simple Guide to Employee Stock Options

Lance Cothern

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podcast
Cryptocurrency 101

A fool and his money are soon parted. Wanna trade cryptocurrency? Don't jump in without understanding the tech, and trading fundamentals.

Cryptocurrency 101

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From Zero to Hero: Get a Financial Education & Start Investing Right

You don’t have money—yet. Learn how to begin businesses, invest in real estate, and make your start in the stock market from scratch.

From Zero to Hero: Get a Financial Education & Start Investing Right

Andy Tanner

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article
The Difference Between Options & Stocks

Learn the difference between options and stocks. One is a full-time job, the other is a long-term investment.

The Difference Between Options & Stocks

Justin McCormick

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article
How to Make Money Using the 5 Profit Centers of Rental Properties

Want to invest in real estate? Here are the 5 biggest things you need to consider before investing in property.

How to Make Money Using the 5 Profit Centers of Rental Properties

Ali Boone

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7 Real Estate Investing Shortcuts: How to Get Started with Less Upfront Cash

Any cash you put in a real estate investment is cash you can’t use elsewhere. Here are 7 ideas to get that upfront cash as low as possible.

7 Real Estate Investing Shortcuts: How to Get Started with Less Upfront Cash

Justin McCormick

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Real Estate Investing 101

Real Estate Investing 101

The Guide to Your First Investment Deal

Elisa Stabile

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