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Jesse Itzler: How to Create Your Life Resume and Value Time

I am extra super fired up because this is an interview with Jesse Itzler. If you're getting to know Jessie, he's a renaissance man. He's an entrepreneur, an author and a former rapper. He's the Cofounder of Marquis Jets, one of the world's largest private jet card companies in the world, a partner in Zico Coconut Water and the Founder of 100 Mile Group and an owner of the NBA’s Atlanta Hawks.


We did this at Ultimate Entrepreneur Camp. This camp is an amazing event. We're in San Antonio or an hour and a half somewhere from San Antonio. I’m not sure what direction. I ran a four-hour endurance challenge put on by Jesse and FortuneBuilders along with 80 other folks that are here.

Running thirteen miles in the night from 8:00 to midnight was crazy. That's just the tip of the iceberg compared to the challenges and the things that Jesse's done in his life to continually push himself out of the comfort zone.

In this episode, you're going to hear directly from Jesse how he's been able to create in so many different areas of his life and do what he calls, “Create your life” resume. When you're looking back, when you're towards the end of your life, are you going to be happy? Are you going to be satisfied with the things that you did? Are you going to be proud of the accomplishments? Are you're going to be able to look back and say, “Yes, I did that experience and I made this happen over here and build all these relationships?”
Without further ado, I am so fired up for you to get into this show...

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Dustin
Jesse, I’ve got to be real with you. I was struggling with what I was going to ask you because I wanted to do something a little different. I did the prep, but I wasn't able to dial in these questions like I wanted to. For some reason, I felt compelled to go out and run and I'm not a runner. I did the course before we actually did the course here at the camp. I felt like it cemented some things by going out and doing this challenge and running. Do you think these crazy challenges like living with the monks, the hundred miles races, the 24-hour races that you do give you clarity or give you an advantage? How does this make a difference in the world? 
Jesse
I don't know if they give you clarity. They give you an edge. Everybody's looking for an edge in business and personally. The only way you get an edge is by earning it and putting yourself into the unknown, stepping into the unknown and challenging yourself. All those things that you learn about yourself and gives you an advantage or a little bit of an edge in anything that you do. For me, I feel super alive when I'm out there. I’m challenging myself, but I always get a lesson that I can apply and I always get a little bit more gritty. At the end of the day, grit is the number one indicator of future success. If you can build your grit muscle, you have a better chance of being more successful in all the buckets of your life. For me, that's how I get it. I get grittier by doing things that challenge me. 
Dustin
What was that first challenge that you did? 
Jesse
I don't think it has to be physical. A lot of the challenges I've had, even getting up on stage as a kid in a performance in front of hundreds of parents is challenging. I'd have to go back to probably my first marathon, 22 years old, as being the first real physical challenge. 
Dustin
What was the impetus to say, “I'm going to do this marathon?”
Jesse
I saw people doing it. I lived in New York. I thought it would be cool to try to run the New York Marathon. I gave myself 40 days to train for it and that was it. I'd never done anything like that and thought it would be cool to go through the training. I was more into the training process, the process of running the marathon than I was the actual day of the event. I love the discipline that I got from it. Putting that on my calendar gave me permission to say no to other things because I had a free up an hour a day or whatever it was to run. To free up that time, it started to help me prioritize things at work and I love that model. If I could replicate that and start to free up time for more things that move the needle in my life and less time for things that slow me down, that would be great. That marathon training helped me create that regimen. 
Dustin
Once you went through it and once you experienced it, were you hooked? Did you realize like, “I’ve got to do more of this?”
Jesse
When I finished the first one, I was like, “Never again. I did it, I’m done. That was hurting.” I didn't know what I was doing but after that, it became highly addicting to me to put things on my calendar that challenged me. 
Dustin
Your life resume is crazy, rapper, ownership in the Atlanta Hawks, private jet company founder, sold coconut water company to Coca-Cola. Early on when you were rapping or even before that, did you know you were going to have your hands in a lot of things? 
Jesse
Now, they call it ADD. Back then they said, “This guy's nuts.” I did because that's always the way I've operated. I operate better having a lot of balls in the air. A lot of other people don't. I've been a multitasker versus a mono-tasker and it's worked for me. Now I've flipped the model and I'm trying to be more single focused. I did always know that I was going to try a lot of things. I always knew I didn't want to work for anybody. I've never had a resume. I always knew that I wanted to create my own path and for me, that meant trying a lot of different things and seeing what sticks. 
Dustin
I've heard you say staying deeply connected to your dream. How do you do that? I hear you say you were ADD, you had a lot of stuff going on. When you found something like when you were maybe even rapping or one of the companies you built, did you know that was your passion and then all those distractions just went away? Is this something you've always had to battle with? 
Jesse
I've always had an unwavering want to accomplish my goal. Whatever my goal is, I don't compromise my goals. If I had a goal to get a record deal, it was unwavering until that happened. There was no, “I tried hard or I got a deal.” There was no, “Sort of, I almost or I tried.” It was all or nothing. I've always married that to a very deep emotional connection to the goal. In that particular example, it was going into the studio late nights, riding my bike twenty miles a night to Corona, Queens to go to the studio from where I lived. You have all of that emotion behind the goal. There's a goal, but you have all this emotion behind it. The obstacles become obsolete. If I had a goal and there was no emotion to it, if I signed up for the marathon, but I never woke up and went out in the rain and the cold to train and I just said, “I'm going to show up and do it,” I probably wouldn't finish. Of all those mornings, it's not the training, it's the discipline. It's the emotional attachment to the commitment that supports it. It's deep in my DNA, baked in my DNA, baked in my subconscious that when I have a blister, I don't care. I've been up at 6:00 in the morning every day. I'm going to go finish this thing as opposed to letting the blister beat me because there's no connection. That's always been part of part of my formula, creating that bond and tying that into the goal, not just having a goal. 
Dustin
You talk about just being in your DNA. Do you think your parents had any influence at all or the environment you grew up in?
Jesse
They had a huge influence in trusting me, supporting me, encouraging me and allowing me to experience a lot of things when I was little. My community, I lived in a small town when I grew up, but it had everything. My town had everything. We had the biggest Ponzi schemer of all time, Bernie Madoff, and we had everything in between. We had poor, rich, black, white and every religion. It was an amazing environment to grow up in. That was the best gift my parents gave me. Growing up where I grew up, for me personally, ended up being the best thing. 
Dustin
Why do you think there's this diverse mix of people in a short or little or small geographic area? Was there something going around? 
Jesse
I don't know. Let me clarify though. I don't think I explained that right. I was talking about someone about my town because in my town, if I took a four-year window from when I graduated and went four years out and four years back, in that eight-year period, we've had multiple professional sports team owners. We have billionaires. I've had five felons, eight people committed suicide. Many people didn't make it. People became homeless. Everything is baked in that window and I'm like, “Why? What happened? What was in the water that we had so much success, so much failure, so much sadness, so much scheming all in this one town? We all had the same high school, same teacher, same opportunity. What in the world happened? Why did my life go one way and someone else went the other way? What happened?” I don't know the answer to it. I've been thinking about it a lot lately. I ask myself a lot of questions. 
I was fortunate because my parents exposed me to diversity in a way and there's nothing wrong with going to a private school or anything like that. They exposed me to all these different kinds of people and philosophies. That's helped me a lot because you come across all different kinds of philosophies and people. Part of business is being able to read people, having an intuition and having a gut feeling. Is this person someone I can trust? Do I want to be in business with this person? I've relied on that. When you get a 90 on your SAT, you’ve got to rely on something. For me, it's been my gut. Once you lose that, you lose one of your greatest assets. They strengthened that intuition by allowing me to be raised in this town.
Dustin
I'm curious because I’ve got two young boys. You've got kids. What are you doing the same as your parents did to foster what you shared with us? What are you doing differently to raise them as good citizens of the world?
Jesse
Two different questions. I give myself a C as a parent in exposing them to what I was exposed to. First of all, it's a different world and our circumstances are different than when I was a kid. My dad owned a plumbing supply house. It was a different circumstance than what Sarah and I have in our life right now. That's always a challenge, but it's at the top of mind, “How do you raise gritty kids?” There are certain things that we do. I try to expose them to as many things that I do. I have to teach them grit in a different way because I don't live in my town. I live in a different community and so I have to introduce grit in a different way. I try to expose them to things that Sarah and I do. For example, I took my son on a mountain for a weekend and we hiked. We've slept on sleeping bags in snowy Mount Washington, exposed to all the elements. I take them on those kinds of trips. I take them to meetings, I take them to stuff to expose them to as many things as I can. It's challenging and as a parent it's important. I'm aware of it and I'm always trying to introduce things. 
Dustin
I want to go back to grit a little bit. It seems like on people's career path or wherever they're going in life, they build something and they sell it off if they're lucky to do it. People get into consulting in that same industry or that same field. It seems like once you conquer something, you're on to the next thing. Did you ever think about going back to being a rapper or getting back in the private jet business as a consultant or anything like that or that doesn't interest you?
Jesse
No. For me, when it's done it's done. Check the box and move on. To me, that’s how you build what I call your life resume. That's always been more important to me than my business resume. I don't want to go back to my old neighborhood. I don't want to go back to Marquis Jet. I don't want to go back to music. I was like, “What's next?” I'm not saying it's the right way to live life but to me, it's more exciting and it makes me feel like I've lived a fuller life. Maybe it's my ADD re-emerging. 
Dustin
It seems like you get super passionate about something or you find something you get super passionate. Are you thinking monetization right away? In a clearer example, you being a rapper because there's that music and the passion for that but like Marquis Jets or even the Zico. Are you super consumed by it and you're going to figure out monetization later or are those thoughts running through your head as you look for your next deal?
Jesse
They always go through my head on some level, but I'm over-obsessed with the product. It's always the product first. The process is always the same. It's perfecting the product and then the monetization will come after. It's always on my head a little bit, but I'm not thinking exit right away like, “We're going to start this and who do we exit to?” It's, “Let's build it. Let's build a great business, let's have fun doing it, and let's do something positive that people like.” Very often for me, I've always started something and it ends completely differently. The business takes a turn or it grows or it goes into a different space, but I'm a big believer in starting the process. Monetization is on my mind on some level, but not in a big way. It's more like, “Let me start this thing and let's figure it out along the way as we go.” I don't wait for everything to be perfect to have all the answers or have it all figured out or say, “Here's my exit or here's what it's going to look like.” I'm not into five-year plans, I'm into now plans. 
Dustin
I feel like you're an open book. You're pretty vulnerable. You let people in and you share what's going in your world. What do you think most people don't know about you?
Jesse
I don't know. I'm an open book when I'm asked questions but I'm not an open book where I'm walking around sharing my emotions and sharing my vulnerability. I would say that I've had all this business success, but I never considered myself to be a businessman. I'm not into the business side of things. I'm into innovation. I'm into newness. I like creativity. If I could sit in front of a computer screen and trade stocks and make billions of dollars, it wouldn't be interesting to me. It wouldn't make me feel fulfilled. I have nothing against it, people love it. I'm not knocking that industry at all. It's amazing and a lot of people make a lot of money and donate a lot of money from that and do a lot of great things. For me, people know it now because I've done a lot of podcasts and I speak about it all the time. I'm into building my life resume. I'm into doing things I love to do with the people I love to do them with. I have fears and other stuff I don't feel like sharing with the world right now but that's what I'm into. 
Dustin
Do you have haters? 
Jesse
I'm sure I do. I don't pay attention to it. I try not to give people a lot of reason to hate me because I try to do the right thing. If they're not with whatever I'm saying, it's up to them but I'm not going to let that weigh me down. 
Dustin
What do you think people misjudge you? 
Jesse
I don’t know. I don't focus on other people's opinions of me. Honestly, I have four kids under nine, I have businesses, I have a relationship, I have parents that are getting older. I can't worry about or give any energy. I only have a limited amount of energy. I have four buckets. I have my wellness, my family, my business and my friends and causes, like a miscellaneous bucket. I'm 50 years old. The average American lives to be 78, so if I'm average, I got 28 years. If it doesn't fit into one of those buckets, I'm not messing with it. If people misunderstand me or hate me or don't believe in what I'm saying, that doesn't fit in one of my buckets. That's not going to do me any good to think about over the next 30 years of my life between 50 and 80. I don't give it one second of thought. I want people to like me, but I don't read my book reviews. I can't worry about that. I can't worry about someone somewhere in the country saying that I'm a jerk. They don't know me. I don't feel like I'm a jerk. I feel like I do a lot of good for the world. I feel like I'm a great parent. I try to be a better parent. I feel like I'm a good son, I’m a good friend. I can't worry about it. 
Dustin
You're notorious for calling people out of the blue that you have a curiosity. What's up with cold calling? 
Jesse
I did when I was younger, less so now. I still do but I wouldn't call it cold calling. I would say if I find someone that inspires me or I want to meet or I need to meet, I make it happen. In the old days, it was cold calling. I would wait in the lobby or I bump into them or I'd figure out their route and take the same route to work and talk or whatever I had to do. When I was young, there were no consequences. It was, “I need to make this happen. I want to make this happen.” I believe we create our own luck and we put our self in a position for luck to find us and I've always lived my life like that. 
Dustin
Do you think entrepreneurs of today need that skill of being able to show up, being able to put themselves in uncomfortable situations to make things happen?
Jesse
It's important. I don't think there's a one-size-fits-all formula. Everybody has a different journey. It's important that entrepreneurs of today understand that things take time. There's a little bit of a misconception around getting rich quick. Things take time and behind almost every story there's a grind. Sometimes that gets lost in translation in the world of instant everything. Instant likes, instant social media, instant information but business isn't instant. Relationships aren't instant. Businesses are built on relationships and that takes time. 
Dustin
Has business changed since you got in?
Jesse
I've never looked at it as a business. I've always done projects that I love to do that I'm super passionate about. I've always woken up, I've always worked for myself. I've never ever thought of it as a business. I really haven't. Has it changed? It gets a little easier as you get older because you have more relationships and you have more access, but I miss the early days. I slept on eighteen couches between the time I was eighteen years old to 21, 22 years old. I slept on eighteen different people's couches along the way. I don't want to give up what I have now, but I miss those days. I miss the process of going through business and not knowing the outcome and trying things and figuring out what works and failing and then having to try again. I miss all that. That enthusiasm changes, it becomes a different energy as you get older. It becomes bigger. 
Dustin
You've built big things. I'm curious, how do you find leaders? How do you recruit? How do you get people excited about getting behind you and doing their gifts so that you can fully remain in what you do? 
Jesse
I've never been great at that. Everybody has an amazing ability and talent. I want to hire everybody, so I've overstaffed my whole life. Managing peoples is tough. That's one of the hardest things in business is keeping people aligned, making sure everybody feels heard, building a culture. That takes a lot of energy and that's all internal. That's not even about product sales, marketing. I've always emphasized that and that's been a skill for me. I love building cultures. I love relationships. I've always tried to care about people that work with me and genuinely, authentically build those relationships. Now I'm in a different chapter in my life. I have four kids. I'm 50, I'm tired. I've laughed at a lot of jokes that aren't funny along the way to get deals. I've been to all the meetings and now I'm at a different chapter. As I turned 50, I realized my window on Earth, it's a 30, 35, 40-year window. I'm not 30 with a 50, 60-year horizon. 
It goes back to the four buckets I mentioned. It goes back to doing more of the things I love to do with the people I love to do them with. It goes back to building my life resume, so I don't have regrets. Here's the thing. I could tell by the line of questioning, this is a business. I understand the audience and everything. People think you always have to get bigger and you always have to scale, and you’ve got to grow. You don't. Once you get to a place where you're good, your business doing $600,000, $700,000, $7 million, $15 million, whatever, if you're comfortable where it is, why do you have to double it? I have a very simple formula, aggravation versus reward. I want a high reward and low aggravation. If something is a high reward and high aggravation, I'm not doing it at 50. Maybe at 30, I would do it. I did do it. I did that in my 20s and 30s, but in my 50s and 60s and late 40s, I don't want high aggravation in my life. Even if I'm going to own Google, I don't want that. I want low aggravation and as much reward as I can get. That's a very simple formula and it's same with relationships too. I don't want people in my life that are going to be high aggravation friends. I want high-reward friends with no aggravation.
Dustin
I want to go back to those buckets specifically. When you feel out of balance, what are the indicators where you feel it and then what do you do about it?
Jesse
I never feel out of balance because I always take time every day for myself. I take two or three hours a day for myself. Most people are like, “That's impossible. I could never do it, I’ve got kids and work.” I’m like, “I have kids too. I work too and I don't have 50,000 nannies running around my house managing everything.” I have the same staff. That doesn't mean I take three hours a day for myself. I've been doing it since I'm 21 years old and it's cumulative. I'll take twenty minutes in the morning, an hour maybe, a walk at lunch or in the afternoon or maybe before I go to bed, I'm taking a sauna. I'm doing nothing but when I'm in my time, I don't feel guilty that I'm not with my kids. I don't feel guilty that I'm not with my wife. That way when I'm with my wife, I'm not guilty that I'm doing something else or if I'm at work, I'm not guilty that I'm not with them. If I do the things that I like to do and I take and check that box every day, I have no resentment when my wife says she wants to go shopping with me. 
I was able to do what I want to do, I'll go shopping with you. I have no resentment or guilt. I don't feel out of balance because as long as I can have the time for myself, even if it's lopsided, I still have done something that's important for me. I try to manage that. I don't always get it right, but I try to manage that. I could be out of balance. I could have a huge project and I'm working twenty-hour days or something, but I still try to carve out a little bit of time for me. That to me balances it out. I have a very simple pie chart. A three-year-old could do it. I draw a circle and I say there are 24 hours in this circle and how do I want to spend them? I need seven of them for sleep. Take three for me. The average American works 40 hours a week, so that's eight hours a day and that still leaves six hours. I've taken three for myself. I've worked a full day and I still have six hours. I have a family, commuting and meals, but my point is when you start saying no to stuff that doesn't move the needle in the buckets that are important, you free up a lot of time. I've been able to manage that balance, four kids under nine, multiple businesses, a wife, parents that I’m taking care of, family members and friends to the best that I can do it. It’s by saying no to a lot of the requests that come through that I used to say yes to.
Dustin
I want to get inside your head when it comes to routines and ruts. If it's a great routine, it's good. I've heard you say that routines lead to ruts. How do you identify when it's a rut versus an effective routine? 
Jesse
I do think routines could be good. Good routines and good habits are so important, but you can't get better living in a routine. You might be operating at a high level but you're not going to get better doing the same stuff because they can be a rut. I believe that you have to get out of your routine once a while to get better. I have habits that I use all the time that you could consider a routine. When I sold Marquis Jets and Zico Coconut Water, I thought I was operating this high-level at these companies. I was. My life was great but I wasn't getting better. I was doing the same thing every day. I was working out, going to work, spending time with my kids. It was amazing and it was hot. I was what I thought operating at a high level, but it was going streamline, straight line. 
I want growth, I want a little bit of a hockey stick growth in my life and I wasn't getting that because it was so easy. I was doing the same stuff. I believe in mixing it up and one of the easiest ways to mix it up is to put something big on the calendar. Get out of your routine, “I'm going to run a marathon, I'm going to hike this map, I'm going to learn how to play the piano, whatever.” Put something out there that you've never done or challenging. There's an old Japanese ritual called the Misogi and the notion around the Misogi is you do something so hard once a year, one day a year that the benefit lasts all 364 other days of the year. I try to do that. I try to do that way more than once a year and it's worked for me. 
Dustin
You touched on it but I want to get as much out of this as possible. You've mentioned before about you've had some realizations about time. I know you touched a little bit on it but what would have been the biggest things as of lately you've realized about time? 
Jesse
When people think in terms of relationships, they think in terms of relationships with people, your relationship with your kids or your parents but very few people understand or think about their relationship with money and their relationship with time. As it relates to time, first of all, it's very hard, myself included, to appreciate it and to appreciate what's left. I spend a lot of time trying to reverse engineer my remaining time. For example, if my parents live in Florida, which they do, unless they lived three more years, I'm just making it up, I hope they live 30, and I see them twice a year. I don't have three years with them, I have six visits. I start to look at life like that and start to reverse engineer it. I look at my son. My son is nine and we have this amazing life in front of us if everyone stays healthy. Then I'm like, “In nine years, he's going to college.” Now my window is nine years. What do I want to do in those? What do I want to accomplish with my son and teach him and travel and do? All those things are within one column. The other column is nine years. I have to fit those things in nine years. I'm super uber aware of time. 
When I dissect it and reverse engineer it, it helps me plan how I want to live my life. I live it with insane urgency. If I want to go to Italy, I make stuff happen because I don't want to regret that I didn't or I couldn't and I'm 50. I like to climb mountains. I like to run. I climbed Mt. Washington in New Hampshire in the winters. It’s super hard to do. There are no 70-year-olds on the summit. That window for me to do that stuff, I'm talking about fifteen years if everything goes right. When you think of that, you better make a list of what it is you want to do. Package it in a fifteen-year block or it's not happening, then you’ve got to regret. Now all of a sudden, you're 70 and you're like, “I didn't do that.” I don't want that and that's how I am super aware of that. I think about it all the time and it's led me to live with tremendous urgency. Not BS urgency, tremendous urgency. 
Dustin
Who are your mentors?
Jesse
I have so many people that influenced me in the different buckets. I have coaches, I have people that I reach out to for advice and for help. I have business coaches, I have business mentors. One of my mentors who probably had one of the biggest influences in my life is a guy named Harvey Diamond. He wrote a book called Fit for Life, which changed the way how I eat. That's been a powerful thing for me. 
Dustin
What have you recognized since reading that book, like the benefit? 
Jesse
 Everything. Nothing has changed my life more significantly than him in that book. You could be an amazing businessman and make zillions of dollars. If you have $7 billion in your bank account right now and we went to Hawaii, you have eight Victoria Secret models feeding you grapes in your bedroom in Hawaii with $7 billion. You had sports teams and airplanes waiting for you in the United States, but you have a sore throat, you don't care about any of that. You just want to get your damn throat better. If you don't have the energy or you're lethargic or you're lazy or you're not inspired or you're not thinking clearly, all that money doesn't mean anything. That book, I have boundless energy. I could spend eleven hours talking about the benefits of the book, the philosophies around his Fit for Life and how Harvey has inspired me but at 30,000 feet, that's an unlikely mentor. People often think about mentors in terms of they immediately go to business, but that's helped my business. I haven't missed a day at work. I'm super vibrant. I've got the energy to take meetings. It's had a big impact on my business without being like, “How did it impact the bottom line?” It impacted the bottom line in all areas. The ROI doesn't have to be on the balance sheet. 
Dustin
Looking back over your life, you've had a lot of things come up. I'm curious as to what you see as your defining moment. When I say defining moment, I'm talking about you had a chance to make a decision and obviously, you picked the decision where you're at now and it changed the path of your life. If you had made that decision, I want you to go back to that moment. When would that be and what were you doing and what was that decision that you made? 
Jesse
I've had several of it because I've been in several different fields. What's interesting about my journey is I've had success and failure in multiple completely different businesses from Zico Coconut Water, which we sold to Coke to a private jet company, we sold to Buffet to the music business. They're all over, just completely different. The three biggest moments for me was one, getting a record deal when I was 21 years old. I'll never forget that moment. That changed the trajectory of my life. Two was running the 100-mile run and committing to that, so many lessons. The pressure that was on me to finish it, the benefits, the life lessons I learned. That was a huge moment. Who I married was probably the single biggest moment. Writing the theme song for the Knicks when I was 22 years old, that was a humongous moment that I recognized when it happened that my life would be different. Starting Marquis Jet. 
I can't single out one. I feel like that's a sign of an entrepreneur. It's an indication that I've tried a lot of them. I’m not banging my chest or padding. You asked the question. It's a sign of someone that's tried a lot of different things and I'm proud of that. If you asked me what my proudest moment is, that might be that I have all these amazing pivotal moments in my life. The only reason why I have them is I put myself out there. Some of them worked, some of them didn't work, but I put myself out there as opposed to having all the answers and waiting for the right time or waiting for the right amount of experience. I was like, “I'm going to try this now before anyone else does it and I'll figure it out. I'll hire around my weaknesses as I go along,” and for the most part, it's worked out. 
Dustin
What do you want your legacy to be? 
Jesse
I don't know. Right now, I have a passion for trying to change some of the deception and problems in the food industry. If you've been on the planet for 50 years or 30 years, 40 years, whatever but for me, it's been 50 years and you don't have a cause that's moved you to want to take action. If you haven't seen something in your life that surfaced like, “This is wrong. I want to speak up about it,” then maybe you're living a little bit in a narrow field or a little sheltered. For me, that cause is making the change in food. I would love to be able to leave the planet and making it better, but I don't give a lot of thought around legacy, maybe I should.
Dustin
Jesse, thanks big time for being on the show. I appreciate it. I feel like you're going to impact me and the WealthFit Nation in so many different ways. Thanks for doing what you do. Where can folks stay up with you, Jesse?
Jesse
I'm on Instagram, @JesseItzler and Twitter as well. I have a website, JesseItzler.com, so I appreciate that. It's always good to be here. I love chatting and I appreciate you having me on. Good luck with the show. 
Dustin
Thanks, Jesse.
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Scott Miller shares the difference between efficiency and effectiveness in this episode on strong, competent leadership.

Management Mess to Leadership Success

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Stress Less!

Stress Less!

How To Boost Your Mood, Lower Your Anxiety, & Avoid Burnout by Strengthening Your Resilience Muscle

Jaime Hope

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Into The Valley Of Fire: Why Struggle Is the Only Way To Progress In Life

Learn how to progress in life by accepting struggle & hardship. Take on bigger challenges—give it your all—and come out stronger than ever.

Into The Valley Of Fire: Why Struggle Is the Only Way To Progress In Life

Alex Carabi

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Better Health Habits

Better Health Habits

How To Level-Up Your Sleep, Diet, Exercise, & Brain Health in Just 5 Minutes a Day

Jaime Hope

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article
Only 1% Of People Have A Self-Transforming Mind: Learn How To Think In Grayscale

Learn the 5 Stages of adult development. Plus learn how to develop a self-transforming mind and join the top 1% of adults.

Only 1% Of People Have A Self-Transforming Mind: Learn How To Think In Grayscale

Alex Carabi

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podcast
Think & Grow Rich: The Legacy

Author of Think & Grow Rich, James Whittaker, takes us on a journey as he discusses hot topics such as how to manage anxiety and whether having an MBA is critical to success.

Think & Grow Rich: The Legacy

podcast
Feel Better Fast, Freaky Eating & The Virgin Empire

JJ Virgin teaches us how to feel great through what we put in our bodies. Learn how to lose fat for good with a natural diet.

Feel Better Fast, Freaky Eating & The Virgin Empire

Powerful Presentations

Powerful Presentations

How To Move an Audience & Sell Like Never Before

Dustin Mathews

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Creating Wealthy Habits

Creating Wealthy Habits

How To Replace “Broke” Habits With “Multi-Millionaire” Habits

JP Servideo

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podcast
A “Real Life” Superwoman

Robyn Benincasa hasn't let her bionic hips get in the way of breaking world records, fighting fires & winning races.

A “Real Life” Superwoman

Relentless Power

Relentless Power

Building A Mindset for Success

Kevin Armentrout

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podcast
From Cancer ... To Rafting Around the World

3-time whitewater rafting world champion, attorney, entrepreneur, cancer survivor. Juliet Starrett's mindset was forged in fire.

From Cancer ... To Rafting Around the World

The 4-Day Weekend Lifestyle

The 4-Day Weekend Lifestyle

How to Re-Design Your Life, Re-Discover Your Passion, and Make Every Weekend A 4-Day Weekend

Croix Sather

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Extreme Productivity

Extreme Productivity

How to Develop Ruthless Focus, Accomplish More, & Conquer “Impossible” Goals

Croix Sather

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podcast
Unlock The Power of the Unfocused Mind

Your unfocused mind might be the key to unlocking your potential. Learn the 5 advantages of slacking (the right way) with Dr. Srini Pillay.

Unlock The Power of the Unfocused Mind

article
Change Your Life (and the World) with an Exponential Mindset

Understanding exponential growth is a CRUCIAL part of creating a wealth building mindset. Learn how to use it to your advantage.

Change Your Life (and the World) with an Exponential Mindset

Amy Blacklock

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podcast
Relentless State of Mind

Whether you’re staring down 20 armed men or heading an office, combat veteran Kevin Armentrout talks what it takes to be a true leader.

Relentless State of Mind

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Get SMART: How to Achieve Your Goals with a Long-Term Mindset

You have goals. Maybe you've had them for years—but they aren't doing you any good collecting dust in a journal. Time to get things done.

Get SMART: How to Achieve Your Goals with a Long-Term Mindset

Jill Huettich

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podcast
Financial Success Through Strong Relationships

How to build your business with relationships. Dave Meltzer explains how negotiating relationships is the key to business growth.

Financial Success Through Strong Relationships

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It’s About Time: Learn How to Spend (and Save) Your Time

Time is running out. Don’t you want to make the most of it? Here’s how you can grab the clock by the hands and make the most of your time.

It’s About Time: Learn How to Spend (and Save) Your Time

Kayla Provencher

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article
Harness the Power of NO: How to Say No, Save Time, and Earn Respect

There’s too much to do. Responsibilities are piling up on your back and you can’t shoulder all of them. It’s time to learn the power of NO.

Harness the Power of NO: How to Say No, Save Time, and Earn Respect

Janine Perri

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article
Let Clowns Do the Juggling: How Multitasking is Killing Your Productivity

How many things are you doing right now? Put down your phone, close your tabs, and learn how focusing in can save the quality of your work.

Let Clowns Do the Juggling: How Multitasking is Killing Your Productivity

Justin McCormick

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article
Check Yourself: Keep a Work Checklist & Up Your Productivity

Check it out! You can improve your productivity by keeping a work checklist. Learn how to write one and take your career to the next level.

Check Yourself: Keep a Work Checklist & Up Your Productivity

Jill Huettich

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Developing a Warrior Mindset

Developing a Warrior Mindset

How to Shatter Your Fear, Upgrade Your Brain, & Fight Your Way to Financial Freedom

David Fabricius

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