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Lacey Langford: Do You Have A Powerful Money Mindset?

Our guest is an accredited financial counselor with over fifteen years of experience in financial planning, counseling and coaching.

She also is the Founder of LaceyLangford.com and The Military Money Show, a podcast dedicated to helping the military community with personal finance. Make no mistake, although she's known as the Military Money Expert, we're going to talk about how all of us can be better when it comes to money.

We're going to discuss a powerful money mindset, how to know if you have one, what to do if you don't have one, and why it's important. We also get into a near-death experience and really how that had set the tone for the rest of her life.

We also talk a little bit about how to silence the haters, how you can instantly determine, “Is this person here helping me? Can I find value?”

What you can say to that person that might not be helping you on your path, any area of life, but especially when it comes to money and a biggie here is how to communicate with your spouse about money without turning it into a conversation that you don't want to have.

We cover a lot in the show. The big question I have for you is, do you have a powerful money mindset?

With that said, let's get to it.

Dustin
Lacey, you've been told by doctors that they have to deliver your first child immediately or you will die. Baby isn't due for three weeks, but yet you're lying on the operating table, while they prep you for surgery, when a nurse comes in, whispers in your ear, "Do you believe in God?" If you can because I know that might be not the easiest place to have a conversation, but please take us back to that moment. How in the heck are you here to even talk to us?
Lacey
My first thought was, “Who is asking if I believe in God? Are you or is this God? What is happening in this moment? Why are you asking me that question?” What it was is that she wanted to pray for me, which was wonderful and I was all for it but disturbing in the moment to be told that something catastrophic is happening to my body that my baby and I are at risk. Less than five minutes later, I am on this table, my arms are being strapped down and then this woman out of the kindness of her heart is asking me, "Do you believe in God?" In that moment I was thinking, "Does she know something I don't know? Is this going to go the way that she is thinking or the way that I'm thinking that? They're going to deliver my baby and we'll get out of here later." No, she was thinking the other way, this is going to go completely wrong. I was overwhelmed but trying to figure everything out like, "Is my baby going to be good? Am I going to be good? What's going to happen after this?" The next thing, they put me under. I went to sleep right after that woman said that to me and started praying over me. I woke up and I had a baby.
Dustin
I've had three bambinos, not me but my wife and I can't imagine. I'm curious where you going in for a routine check-up or did something happen and you're like, “Let's go now?”
Lacey
I know it was crazy. Actually, it's going to give away a lot about myself in my first pregnancy. I woke up really early, my husband was on active duty in the military at the time and we only had one car. He was in jump school at the time so I had to take him, and I had to get up 4:00 in the morning. In the later part of my pregnancy, I wanted a McDonald's Sausage Biscuit every day. My first signal that something was wrong is I got a sausage biscuit from McDonald's after I dropped my husband off and I couldn't eat it. I didn't want it. It felt like this isn't something I can eat. I started to not feel well and I had some other symptoms. I went to the hospital and they told me, “You might not be feeling well. We're going to keep you here for a little bit and observe you.” It went downhill very quickly after that. They got some blood results and said, “It's not looking good. We're going to have to go ahead and deliver the baby. That way, you are both safe.”
Dustin
Good for you for trusting your body and going in because some people would've chalked that up to, "I'm sick,” or something like that.
Lacey
The sausage biscuit saved my life. 
Dustin
That's funny what he put into that context. Lacey, I want to rewind the clock a little bit from here. I want to go back to your teens. You did something that makes every parent cringe. You wrecked one of the family cars and a good stern but totally fair dad, he made you pay for that car that you wrecked. As they say, “Every obstacle is an opportunity.” What did you take away from let’s call it the incident? What did you take away from that and then having your dad make you own up and be responsible for that?
Lacey
The main message was being careless will cost you things, will cost you money. That's ultimately what happened is my dad sat me down and said, "This was not in our budget. It's going to come out of your budget and since you don't have one, you're going to have to create one." I started bagging groceries and working to pay for the money to cover the cost. My dad talked with the other vehicle owner and they were kind enough to say, “If you guys will pay for the repairs out of pocket, we won't report it to the insurance," since she just got her license. Before the person ever got the repair done, I had come up with the money. We had a little checklist. Every time I bagged groceries, I would come home with cash and I would count it out to my dad and he would annotate on the list how much money I gave him. I'm working up to the total that I owed him, which was over $600 or $700.
Dustin
I got to share this with you, Lacey. I had a very similar experience, but it wasn't the family car. It was my friend's family car. I was driving their car and I can still remember getting up at 4:00 AM to deliver newspapers to hotels. It wasn't $600, it was a couple of thousand dollars. It took me quite a bit. It taught me responsibility and to use your words being careless will cost you and that's exactly what happened to me.
Lacey
It hurt at the end because I had never had that experience before working hard for money only to give it all away. Every day, I was working long hours. Sometimes people were rude to me when I was bagging groceries. It was not fun. I was out in the weather but I made a lot of money. Every day it would feel awesome putting that in my pocket and going home and counting it out only to have the sick feeling that I was going to give it to my dad. 
Dustin
I can relate.
Lacey
It's bringing up a lot of traumatic experiences for us.
Dustin
I'm curious because you come from a service background. Your dad was in the Army and obviously, he inspired you to serve but you went into Air Force. I'm very curious because sometimes families they go through the same service branch and so you pivoted a little bit. How did you come to be in the Air Force?
Lacey
My dad was an officer in the army. I decided after high school, I went to Community College for a little bit, but I was focused on making money. That was something that I was interested in. I didn't want to go to school at the moment. I knew ultimately I would want to get a degree, but the deal was if I didn't go to school, I had to pay rent. If I didn't have a degree going into the military, I would be enlisted. I knew the day was coming because I had stopped taking classes and I knew my dad was going to start asking for money because of the whole car incident. I knew that it would be coming out of my budget, not his. I went ahead and took the ASVAB with the army and started the process behind my parents' back of joining the army. The day came, my dad sat me down and he's like, “You're not going to school anymore. You have to start paying rent. What are your plans?” I said, “I'm joining the military. I've already done X, Y, Z.” I explained the process to him. He was like, “I'm impressed that you took the initiative, that you're doing this for yourself and creating a path. I would like you to talk to the Air Force recruiter though. That's the only thing that I ask out of this whole thing. They might have a different quality of life for you being enlisted than you would have in the army and that might better suit you.” I went and talked to the Air Force recruiter and I was like, “I'm joining the Air Force.”
Dustin
That's some incredible insight. That speaks to your father, knowing your dad, knowing you, and knowing the landscape there. Do you see it that way?
Lacey
Yes. Growing up, I struggled in school. It wasn't something that I was interested in. Not that I didn't find value in it. I loved working though. I started working when I was fourteen years old bagging groceries and that was the direction I wanted to take. He knew that at that moment, I needed some time to figure out what I wanted to do with my life and the military would be a good fit for me with the structure. I was familiar with it. That's how I grew up in the military. It wasn't scary for me. Basic training was scary, let me be clear on that.
Dustin
I want to ask you in addition to the car that we've mentioned, you've had a few other hard money lessons along the way. I'm curious as to what those hard money lessons are?
Lacey
I made great money when I was in the military but somehow ran up credit card debt. I was very blessed to have a father and mother that taught us all to live on less than we make and save money. I had those values, but I didn't always listen to them. When you're young and have a steady paycheck and want to go out and have a good time. Unfortunately, I did build up the credit card debt. When I met my husband, he had no debt but I had debt. We were going to get married and that's not how we wanted to start our life together. My dad gave all of us, my siblings and I, a cash option when it came to getting married. He would give us a set amount of money and we could either take the money and run, or we could put it towards a wedding. My husband and I chose the cash prize to take it and run. We were able to take that money and put some of it towards my debt. I didn't have to use it all but same lesson again, all that money was in our hands, but we had to give it away to somebody else. It's very frustrating to repeat that behavior.
Dustin
Is that when things started to click? With my understanding, Lacey, you started off volunteering. Understanding and coming to terms with money is one thing but then now teaching it to others. Was it that moment? Was it earlier or when you were teaching first-time soldiers savings, budgeting and personal finance stuff? Where was that start of you sharing some of the things you had learned with others?
Lacey
It started when I was getting out of the military that I wanted to take my career path towards finance because I did learn these basic lessons, but investing wasn't something that was big in our household. I wanted to learn that. I figured the best way to learn that would be to go to school about it. I got my degree, but I actually got married on my spring break. I did things in a non-traditional way. I joined the military after high school instead of going to college. I went to college after the military. I got married and then we started a family and it was very difficult for me to start my career path as a military spouse, but also in finance, because I was limited to where my husband was stationed. The first place was Charleston Air Force Base. I struggled to find employment there. We started having children but after the birth of our second child when my husband was going to deploy to Iraq, I decided, "I want to finish up this journey." That's when I decided when he's going to be gone for the year, I'm going to go to school for the year. I went and took the Certified Financial Program at Duke University. I figured while he's doing some time, I'm going to do some time and further myself along. It was after that I started volunteering but also helping people one-on-one friends and family and started to do my own thing on the side. That's when I got into the thick of volunteering.
Dustin
Was it more of an “I want to teach this so that I can learn?” Were people coming to you and saying, “Teach me?” Were you thinking, "This is a money play, this is a side hustle,” as some people call it or an opportunity to bring an income? Where were you mentally in that?
Lacey
Mentally, I failed the CFP exam that stung really badly. I wanted to help people one-on-one, but I couldn't work for an advisor. My husband was gone most of the time with small children. It was difficult to have steady employment. When I started, I thought, “It’s a great place to help other people with money. I'll volunteer.” When I started doing that, some things that I took for granted that were second nature to me that I learned growing up, other people didn't have those lessons to say, “You can't spend every bit that you make. You have to save for your future self. This money needs to be put into savings. This money needs to be put into long-term savings. You save for the things you want, you don't get them in the moment. You can't be sporadic with your money."
The more I did that, the more I found out I enjoyed it. In the beginning, I thought, "I want to be a financial adviser." Helping people one-on-one showed me that I want to help them get where they want to be with money. I want them to have confidence with it and control and not be scared of it. To understand that it's approachable. Everybody struggles with money. Everybody makes mistakes like me with the car, me running up the credit card debt and having to take marriage money to pay that off. It's very frustrating. Sometimes when people are in the thick of it, they don't see the light on the other side. I like being that light for people to say, “We're going to get over there.”
Dustin
I appreciate the game that you're playing in the world. Lacey, we've mentioned service members quite a lot, Army Air Force and it'd be easy to say financial principles and they apply to everyone most certainly. However, I believe there are nuances or considerations for those in the military because I grew up in the military but I didn't actually serve. I don't have that firsthand knowledge and I suspect a lot of people reading that aren't military don't either. I'm curious, what is different from a financial perspective for those that are serving our country?
Lacey
The two biggest things are, first, security clearance. There are a few civilians that have this issue as well. Most people join the military are required to have a security clearance to do their job. To maintain a security clearance, you have to meet these certain adjudication elements. One of them is your finances. Service members, finances are held to a higher standard than other people. To have a large amount of debt or to have debt and collections or to not be truthful with your money, to say that you had bankruptcy but aren't letting your security officer know that information, that's a problem. Having your money in order is important in the military because if you can't maintain your security clearance, then you can't maintain your job. Oftentimes, that means you will no longer be in the military or you'll have to go through the painful process of starting over again transitioning into a completely different career field that may not be one that you're passionate about or one that maybe you were setting yourself up for a civilian career by the one that required the security clearance. 
That is one thing that's different, but also the amount of transition that service members go through and their families are much higher than their civilian counterparts. When I'm talking about transition, I'm talking about moving in the military community, they call it PCS, Permanent Change of Station. Oftentimes, people are moving every six months to two years, maybe three years. In between those moves, there's still temporary duty which could be a school that they're required to go to or some training. There could also be deployments to the Middle East or other areas of the world that are smack in the middle of a two-year move. There's not a lot of time for them to get settled or to be proactive and stay ahead of those transitions to plan their finances. Those are two difficult areas for the military community when it comes to money.
Dustin
I'm glad you shared that. I never thought that a security clearance would be tied to finance. I don't think a lot of people know that. Can you be honorably discharged? Can you be discharged because you lose your security clearance?
Lacey
Yes. You can be pulled out of the military. It would have to be an extreme case. It's very personalized why somebody would have their security clearance revoked and ultimately be put out of the military. It could be that you're embezzling money that a lot of times a young service member could be in charge of a lot of expensive equipment or money and that could impact their security clearance. It comes down if you're being honest with your money and you're meeting your financial obligations. That's a big point for the Department of Defense is that if you say you're going to pay somebody you borrow money, that you pay that money back because that could lead to other problems. You could become a national security risk because let’s say, you have a large amount of debt or you have this behavior that's happening over and over again with money. It might be tempting to say, "We'll give you this money if you take a picture of your workspace." It could be that simple as, "All we want is one picture and we'll give you $50,000."
Dustin
I'm glad you shared that because that makes it real for people. It makes it real for me that's for sure. I want to ask you this in looking at your resume, I notice you're an accredited financial counselor and I don't know that I've seen that term before and it naturally makes me think of a certified financial planner. What is an accredited financial counselor and how is it different from a CFP or a Certified Financial Planner?
Lacey
They go through the same accreditation process as a CFP. They’re only two with money certifications that have that. Counseling, that word can be scary for some people. If you think about somebody that you’re counseling might be in crisis, somebody that's your coaching probably needs help, an advisor, your help doing it for somebody. As an accredited financial counselor, I'm helping people that want to know how to get out of debt. They want to understand credit. They want to understand how to save for the child's education. They want to be better with their money management. It's not heavier into the holistic view with you talking taxes, estate planning, investing that a CFP would have, but you're helping people more with the money management.
Dustin
Why did you feel it was important? My understanding is you can counsel people without having accreditation. Why did you feel it was important to get that? 
Lacey
One, I always like to be held to a higher standard. I wanted to continue my education. I wanted people to know that I take it seriously helping people with their money. Even to this day, I know the responsibility when I'm telling somebody something about money. It impacts not only themselves, their family, for years to come because you could be teaching somebody a lesson that they're going to pass down to their child. You could be teaching somebody something that could change their life for the better. It’s a serious business and I want people to know that I do have continuing education. That is a requirement that I've had this training and I don't take it lightly.
Dustin
You've been doing this for quite some time working with folks on their finances and how to be better in this area. I want to ask you, what has surprised you about this journey that you've been on in this area?
Lacey
How many people are scared of money? That still surprises me that it's themselves that's holding them back. That they have these, I call it the backpack full of BS. It's a way of making it visual for people that we all carry around this backpack that has in it things that have happened in the past. The good, the bad, the ugly, people that have done us wrong, financial mistakes we've made, things that traumatize us as kids with money or maybe made us good with money as children. A lot of times people keep holding onto the negative and it's holding them back from being the great financial self that they can be. It's surprising to me that they get in this mindset and they're not willing to let go of that or it’s holding them back. They could be more. It's sad sometimes.
Dustin
You call this powerful money mindset and it's changing. This is what you're doing. You're helping people go from being fearful of money to having control and confidence with it. You described it, but I'm very curious about the process. If I've identified, "She's right. I do have a backpack full of BS." How do now I go to work to fix that?
Lacey
The first thing is changing your mantra. The things that you say to yourself, you have to make it positive. That's where it started out as a lot of people keep repeating this negative mantra that, "I can't do that. I can't get out of debt. I don't understand money." You have to stop doing that to yourself. If you wouldn't talk that way to somebody you love and care about, you sure as heck should not be talking to yourself that way. Catch yourself. When you start to do that like, "I can't do this." You have to change it to, “I can do this. It's just going to take a minute. I'm going to have to figure it out, but I can do this. I can get out of debt, I can do this.” That mantra changing it is ground zero for getting your mindset in the right spot but also understanding what a healthy mindset is first of all important. That's the ability to adapt and overcome and be flexible and accept yourself for who you are with money. You may not be where you want in the moment, but that doesn't mean that that's not going to be different in the future. It might take some steps to get there, that you can do that. I say it like, “If life throws a pie at your face, you have the ability to duck. If you don't, then you have a sense of humor about getting pie on your face.”
Dustin
There's a lot, Lacey, I love that you said. The first one, I want to underline because I understand it. All of us understand reading and 100%. The things that we say to ourselves and what made it real for me was you wouldn't say that to someone you love and care yet we say it to ourselves. When you say it that way, you're right and it calls to you. 
Lacey
It's hard. I'm guilty of it too. I still have to catch myself I've been going through this actually I'm creating a course. It's a new venture for me and I'm not familiar with it. I'm having to learn a lot and it's a whole other skillset. I am like, “Why am I doing this? Who wants to hear me talk about this?” I have to stop myself to say, "You do have some training in this. You do know what you're talking about. This is new so you're scared and you're trying to put this limited belief on yourself." It's difficult but it's an exercise you have to keep practicing.
Dustin
It's funny because that's what we do here at WealthFit and we create courses. Obviously, we look for people that are well-known in the spotlight but also too, we're looking for everyday people to communicate. I didn't get a lot of the lessons I know now from my parents. They're not bad people. They went on a different path. It's incredibly valuable what you tell yourself. I want to ask you this for the skeptic out there, Lacey. I know you've probably experienced a skeptic or two in your life. When you say changing your mindset and mantra, some people would be quick to say, “That's a Law of Attraction stuff. That's woo-woo out there. How can I change my words and money? Is it going to fall from the sky?” What do you say to that person?
Lacey
I usually say to those people, “Tell me what you are doing and how it's working for you?” If it's working well, why are you at this point? If your mindset is right and your money management skills are right, why do you have debt? Why are you repeating the same bad financial behaviors? If you don't change something about yourself, you're going to continue to have the same results. To do better, you're going to have to try something different and so you should give what I have to say a shot. It's rethinking and maybe doing a couple of exercises like writing down things you're good about with money.” For me, that's very simple that a lot of times people will focus on the negative. You have to start focusing on the good things like, "I pay my bills on time." That's huge. That's the biggest part of the game, pay your bills on time. Often people aren't seeing the things that they're good at. One is opening the mail. I've had a lot of people that bring in a trash bag full of unopened envelopes.
They've never even looked at their bills because they're scared of them. Little things like that to notice what you do good about money might ultimately change the way that you're looking at things to help you be better but also tracking the things that are of value that are coming into your life as if always tracking the things that are going out. What about that Starbucks that a friend bought you? What about that $5 your grandma sent you in the mail? Those are things that you could start also finding the good. For the skeptics, I would say, “If your way isn't working, you should be open to trying something simple that might ultimately get you where you want to be.”
Dustin
This is a powerful life lesson I believe more than the money conversation we're having here, but going back to that skeptic or maybe that person that's not so gung-ho on where you're headed and asking them that question, "Tell me what's working for you?" I’ve got to imagine they're going to backpedal or they're going to be quiet. Even if they are, you can see maybe there is nothing to learn from this person. I need to go that way. That's incredibly powerful.
Lacey
I give people when I coach now I know what I'm doing and I can identify very early on that they feel they have it all figured out. They don't understand why they're talking to me. I have a three-strike policy. I try three times to explain a better way to you. On the third time, that's when I get a little tough love and say, "It sounds like you have it all figured out. You tell me what's working and we'll go from there. You tell me how you're going to fix this and make it better because I gave you three ideas to make it better and you're telling me how all three won't work for you. It sounds like you're not ready to make a change yet."
Dustin
I can tell in you that you're a giver and I'm a giver as well. The challenge is you give and give. If people don't receive, that tires you out the person that they're serving. That's incredibly profound. Lacey, I want to ask you about this. It's a little slippery. Let's say I'm reading a conversation. I'm checking out some of the materials that you offer. I'm getting what you're saying, I'm adopting it, I love it, I'm working on my mindset. Let's say I have a significant other. What is your advice for couples where one is more open-minded and then the other person isn't? Maybe it's not you, Lacey, directly talking, but it's the spouse having to communicate the ideas they've learned from you to that person, how do you coach people up in that area?
Lacey
Two main things is a communication of what to expect document. Not even when you're in a relationship, it's important to understand your self-truths. What's important to you? What do you value? What will you physically fight for? When you're in a marriage or a relationship, you each have been raised differently with money. If you both were raised exactly the same like you hit the lottery, that's wonderful. Often people find love or show love in a different way that could involve money or it could involve kind gesture. If you're married to somebody that they want to shower you with gifts even though they can't afford them because that's how they show you love versus you would just like them to make your bed or change your oil. Something that wouldn't have been so expensive.
The first thing as an exercise is to write down what's important to each of them separately. That this couple, they do that separately to say, "These are the things that I value. It will stress me out if our rent is late. It will stress me out if we don't have money for food. It will stress me out if I can't get my hair done. It will stress me out if I don't get to watch the game with the guys at a pub." Writing down where you start to get uncomfortable with money is important and to do it separately in that way, they can read those documents because there's no emotion on that. You've already written it down and thought about what's important for you.
It's good for the individual to know that, “These are the things that are going to stress me out. These are the things that I'm going to go to bat for. This is going to be where it's going to get uncomfortable.” Also, for the person you're in the relationship with, to read that document or to know those things about you that I'm getting into territory where this is going to upset my wife, this is going to upset my husband. You can know that, "If you go into this territory, that was your bad." It was already identified. Having that document go to the second part is communication. You can't expect somebody to read your mind to say, "You knew that when I was ten, this happened with money and it makes me uncomfortable."
Let's give them a pass. Maybe they don't remember the story about when you were ten or in the moment, they weren't thinking about that. Instead of you speaking up and to say, "This is making me uncomfortable and this is why," or this is the item for our holiday spending that you are used to having a certain amount of gifts and you want to do that for your children. If you know that's the case, then January 1st you should be saying, "We need to budget to have this amount of money so we can buy the kids these gifts because this is an area that's going to be difficult for me." Communicating and also writing down what's important to you so you know and the person you're in the relationship with knows that.
Dustin
It’s communication, mindset, changing the mantra mindset. What are other ways in addition to those that we can be better with money?
Lacey
Being proactive and not playing dumb. I know that's not nice to say, but a lot of people do that. If you know that you want to get married soon, you're in love, you should be saving for a ring. Don't think that that ring and that money is going to fall into your lap. If you know that your marriage isn't going well, you know that probably marital counseling is going to be in the works or it could be going the other way. You have to look at the reality of your life and be willing to face it and not put your head in the ground and think that that's going to go away. Being proactive and looking at things that could potentially have a shift or costs you money is important to be able to handle them and not be shocked or sad or scared by them that you face those things that are going on in your life. The bad and the good, and handle them in the moment instead of pushing it away. 
Dustin
You're bringing back memories, Lacey. I remember when I had started a business many years ago, I got a whole bunch of business credit cards. I remember not wanting to know that number of how much debt I was in because I was so gung-ho. I was there. One day though, I said, “If I'm going to pay this all back, I going to do it.” That's where I got proactive. I kept my head down and I paid it all off. There was that point where I'm like, “I don't want to know. I'm afraid of that number of how much debt I was in.”
Lacey
You're proactive. You're in control. You are the captain of the ship instead of being reactive and crap keeps getting thrown in your lap. Most of the time, it's not a good time for something to be thrown in your lap. It becomes this juggling act. It's stressful, it ends up costing you extra time and money instead of looking at those things and handling business.
Dustin
Do you have any favorite resources or hacks so to say around money? I know people are always looking for the magic bullet or useful things that they can do that they hadn't considered. Do you have anything?
Lacey
I am the ‘keep it simple’ girl. It's the coach in me, but how people handle and manage money comes down to their learning style. One thing that may work for me may not work for my husband or it may not work for you. Some people love Excel sheets, I have found through coaching that when I would do budgeting with people, I would use an Excel sheet because that was easy in the moment to quickly turn out a budget for somebody and make changes. They would leave and they wouldn't use it. I was so confused. I put my heart and soul into that budget for you. Part of it is the person not taking action. The other part I started to learn was that it didn't work well for them. They like to have a notebook or a piece of paper or some people I even learned like to have a dry erase board. They had that in their kitchen or their living room and it was very visual to them and their spouse or just to them. When it comes down to managing your money, you have to do what works best for you. Sometimes that's trial and error and use other people as inspiration like if I'm using an Excel sheet or a notebook paper, I'm using an app. I say keep it simple and the way that works best for you because that way you'll use it.
Dustin
I want to ask you about this we are on a podcast, we're fans of podcasting. You started The Military Money Show, a podcast dedicated to helping the military community with personal finance. I'm interested to know what you hadn't anticipated. You get this idea, you get excited, you want to pay it forward, and you want to share your message with the world. What hadn't you anticipated at the start that you have experienced in doing the show?
Lacey
I didn't anticipate imposter syndrome. For somebody that helps people with money, you would think doing a podcast about money in the military, which is my niche, that I would be confident going into that but I wasn't because I had never done a podcast before. I didn't feel I was a real podcaster and that rattled me in the beginning and my confidence in sticking to what I know. Talking about money and attitudes with money, interviewing people was what I somewhat did, coaching people, I was always having discussions. Going into it, I feel I had the skill set for it but I didn't have the confidence for it and I was not ready for that at all.
Dustin
What have you learned about doing the show? You already had years of experience in working with people. I'm curious to see what you have gleaned from doing the show. 
Lacey
People want value. When they're coming to the show, they're there for a reason. They want to learn, they want to improve, they want to be inspired or they want to have fun. I need to keep that in mind when I'm doing my show. That's something that is evolving and I'm trying to hone in on and get better at my craft at being a podcaster to still be the coach and be able to help people and ask questions that I know somebody at home is thinking about. That they're scared to ask and I want to be the one to ask. I'd rather be in the chair than that person. Those are things that I'm trying to improve on is to have those moments for people that why they're coming to the show gets met.
Dustin
I hear you’re a big fan of Sara Blakely. We were fortunate to have her hubby on the show, Jesse Itzler. That was a fun show. I'm curious as to what you like about her. Why are you a big fan?
Lacey
This is going to be hard to be succinct on but I'm going to try. She had an idea and nobody believed in her. She didn't quit. She kept going for it. It was something very simple. Something that women struggled with which she created Spanx. To make her pants look better and smoother when she wore them, she would cut the feet out of pantyhose and wear these, but it really wasn't long-term stable. You had to keep buying pantyhose. She created this product and everybody turned her down, but they were all men. She kept going because she's like there is a market for these people who want that. That's amazing. She also wrote her own patent, which is super cool. It talked about major bootstrapping. She also was like me that she failed the LSAT. I have failed the CFP exam. I've always struggled with test-taking, and it's inspirational to me that she's built this massive business on her own terms, highly successful. She did it her way and she's had failures. She hasn't let that hold her back at all. It's maybe helped her in the long-term. I'm a huge fan.
Dustin
Lacey, I'm very curious about what the future holds for you. What are you working on? What are you most excited about? 
Lacey
I'm excited about 2020 for my podcasts, the Military Money Show. I've done a lot of work behind the scenes to get better at my craft interviewing guests, but also the management of my show and improving the quality. I'm excited to be more creative and provide value in 2020. I'm also starting a course, The Financial Coaching Business Builder. I've picked up a skillset helping. I'm doing my own coaching business. I want to help other people do what I've done. If I can save them some of the heartache and some of the money, I would be very happy with that. Those are two of the big things that I'm doing in 2020. 
Dustin
The Military Money Show, I want to encourage folks to check that out on iTunes or wherever they have their favorite podcasts. You've got the website. For those that enjoyed our conversation and want to go even further maybe somebody in the military, maybe you're in the military sharing and then also going to LaceyLangford.com. Is there any other area that would be good for folks that enjoy our conversation and want to go deeper with you? 
Lacey
Yes. I have a whole article and podcast on Powerful Money Mindset, which is important for people that want to change that. You can check that out on LaceyLangford.com and then also the podcast LaceyLangford.com/podcast
Dustin
Lacey, I appreciate you for being on the show. Even more importantly, you doing what you're doing in the world and you’re not only helping service members with their money but anybody that has a desire to improve. I 100% am with you on the money mindset. It all starts from within the mindset. Thank you for paying it forward and sharing your message with the world.
Lacey
Thanks for saying that. I appreciate being on the show. This has been a lot of fun.

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