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Lauren Wallett: Business Alchemy, Collaborative Consumption & Creative Structure

My guest is one you are going to love.

She is a South African serial entrepreneur who sold her first two businesses before turning 27. She's now a coach having worked with over 2,000 people and worked with 58 companies around the world including Kraft Heinz and Techstars.

She empowers entrepreneurs through creative strategies to take action so they can turn their ideas into gold.

Our guest is Lauren Wallett.

We're going to talk about business alchemy. We're going to talk about creative structure, collaborative consumption, problem-solving and how to express yourself fully. We cover quite the gamut here.

If you're looking for a smorgasbord of ideas that are going to make you profitable, that is going to expand your mind, and then you are going to love this.

With that said, let's get to it.

Dustin
October 24th, 2017, you were flat broke, exhausted and about to get on a plane leaving behind the bright city lights of LA. You gave it a second thought and decided to give it one more go. Within 24 months, you radically transformed your life and built a six-figure business. Lauren, where were you about to go on that plane? More importantly, how in the heck did you turn it around?
Lauren
I love the dramatic start. It's hard, which is probably one of the reasons why I’ve been drawn to this place because it is theatrically expressed every day. It feels I'm in a music video, so I love it. I’ve only been here a week. I’ve come to LA a few times, but I'm originally from South Africa. I was on a creative sabbatical, which had started both in San Francisco. I'd been here for a week and I was about to get on the plane to go to New York for a week, then Bali for a month where I was going to write poetry in a tree house and completely decompress and get over the exhaustion that I'd felt from a running content marketing agency in South Africa. I had no idea that my creative sabbatical had turned into a wild party ride and I had blown all my savings.
During this trip, it was that point where I woke up on that morning and realized that I’ve spent all my money. I've spent emotionally, physically, spiritually and I heard this small, quiet voice that can only be described as intuition which said, “Stay.” Because the voice has always been, “Leave and get going and do something different,” it was the first time I'd ever heard it. I decided not to get on the plane to New York or to Bali and I landed up staying in LA, where I applied for a green card for exceptional ability as a celebrity entrepreneur and I’ve been here for a couple of years. I’ve never looked back. I’ve never left.
Dustin
I can completely relate to going fast. Why do you think you heard it say stay for the first time as opposed to going?
Lauren
It's probably for me, the one place in the world which feels that it is huge and expensive that no matter how much you want to grow and expand as a person, there's space for you. It's not going to be constrictive. It felt like a place that if I put down roots, not only could I put down deep roots where my branches could expand true and I could become the fullest version of myself. Whereas before, I'd felt that I needed to contort myself to fit into a certain society or make myself smaller or be a little bit duller or even a little bit dumber to fit in with everyone else. LA felt like a place where you can be who you truly are and they will be a group of people who not only understand that but embrace it and celebrate it.
It felt like a different place. It was unplanned, which I’ve also learned to take cognizance of because I was used to be an A-type personality. I plan everything and I have goals to achieve and I achieve them all. When I let things spontaneously happen, that's where the magic lies. This turn of events, which were like, “You should stay here,” it was something different. I’ve learned to trust that intuitive difference when it's such a change of pace.
Dustin
I most certainly want to talk about the intuitive difference that you have, the creativity, the things that you talked about before. I want to make sure people get a full glimpse into Lauren. As you mentioned, you being from South Africa, you did something that most people don't get to do in a lifetime. You sold two businesses before you were even 27 years old. One of them was a performing arts center in South Africa. Was the other content marketing agency that you talked about?
Lauren
The other was an acting agency. It was an extension. I had the performing arts school called Star Quality and then I had the acting agency which had started off as another part of the school and then broke away. I formed a separate partnership with a business partner and she both had agency from me. That agency is still running in South Africa. It's nationwide. It's one of the top agencies for men and women and children. It's grown in a whole business. That one still thrives. The other one, the performing art school, was also bought at the same time and that one shut down within a year. That was an interesting lesson for me to learn in terms of how important the goodwill of a brand is and keeping the continuity going. If you are buying a business, you're buying that brand ethos. The goal that bought the business and kept my brand, it's never shut down. The people who bought the business and changed the name, look, feel and style, it didn't last a year.
Dustin
I thought I had seen in your background you are a performer. Is that how you got into opening both of those because they were in the performing arts?
Lauren
I performed professionally from the age of nine and I went to performing arts school. That's my background. That was great. I think business training because you're learning how to produce something out of nothing. You're directing and you're producing and you're writing and you're conceptualizing things that don't yet exist and then you’re performing. You have to captivate an audience and entertain them. After the performing arts school, I had been in a show that was touring with one of my teachers who trained me in university, the choreographer. The show went under and the producer lost the money, which was extremely frustrating for me primarily as an entrepreneur. I thought never again do I want to be in a position where I'm under the direction of someone who doesn't know how to manage or scale or grow a business effectively. I teamed up with the choreographer and we then started performing arts holiday workshops. Within a few months of doing that, I decided I need something bigger than this. I want a business. That's when I created the performing arts school. That grew very rapidly. Within over two years, I had over 100 full-time students and it was a thriving business. It did come out of performance but also out of the necessity of I liked to be in control and do things my way.
Dustin
That is so type-A and I love that. That's the entrepreneurial spirit. You want to control it. You want to make sure you can perform your craft, so why not build the business around it? That's great.
Lauren
I like to teach how it's done. It was super fun and expressive, but ultimately I'm a producer so I want to be on the business side of things.
Dustin
I'm always fascinated at entrepreneurship, people that decide to go that route as it's for sure not the easiest. I wanted to ask you this before we depart from here. Why did you sell? You had built both of these things, you were performing. How did you come to that decision and why did you sell?
Lauren
I was married at the time, and I was living far out of the city at a farmhouse. We were living half on a farm and then half my ex-husband was doing a lot of inner-city regenerations. Our spending time was split. My school, my practice was in the middle of these two worlds and my marriage was failing. It was an emotionally-charged decision. I thought that by giving up on the business and selling it, I could invest not only the money from the business but the time into the marriage, which at the time was a great idea and I'm glad that I gave it my best shot, but something needs to change. It was primarily my marriage. The second part of it was the fact that I was young. I was 26 years old and I was bored. I gave up on the business before I gave up on the marriage. I did that next, but something needed to change in my life and it wasn't satiating me. It wasn't fulfilling. I felt that I'd mastered it, I'd got it done and it wasn't feeding me the way that it did. It was a combination of personal and professional reasons and being young. I didn't have a lot of follow-throughs. I noticed I stick with things more but I was like, “I’ve done this, and it’s successful. What's next?”
Dustin
I know you've coached thousands of people and you've worked with people from all walks of life. For those that aren't type A, because I could feel it, you're exciting and you want to go out there and conquer the next thing. At the same time, you're learning about intuition and slowing down. For those reading that have always wanted to start that business, that side hustle that aren't type A, what's your advice for them to take that first step?
Lauren
That's a great question because it's something that I do find challenging because my thing would be how could you not? It's not even an option for me not to do it. I try to hold myself back from all the ideas that I have. If there's something that's in your heart that's calling out to, something that doesn't exist in the world that you can see and you can feel, that's a specific calling and not everyone has that. I always say to my clients, “That's the main thing I need you to have to start with is that burning desire.” How it happens is not as important as wanting it to happen. You can build up your confidence, you can get a mentor, a coach, you can study something, you can learn how. If there is that call, there comes the point where you have to answer or you will always be feeling that what if, that unknown, that there's a sense of lack.
There comes the point where the pain of holding onto what you know is more excruciating than the fear of failing or the fear of putting yourself out there and it becomes like you need to jump. If you're feeling it, keep asking yourself what that is. Go into that thing that's calling you. Get curious, ask questions. Why does the world need this? Why do I need it? You start to develop a relationship with yourself and your desire. Eventually, when that becomes solid, like any relationship, you want to take it to the next level and you're going to want to give birth to it. You're going to want to start to share it with people and then it starts to happen organically. You'll feel the labor pains. It'll stop.
Dustin
I appreciate your way of looking at the world and I want to get into that. How did you get from South Africa to LA or to the US? What brought you here?
Lauren
It was literally a holiday. I was a creative sabbatical. I'd been running my life content marketing agency, I’ve been working with some big international brands and I had enough. I felt that I'd proved my methodology. I ran a deconstructed aggregated agency model. I loved doing it, but I also realized that agencies are charging these huge prices to people to give them this information, which can be distilled and distributed in a different way. I'm more interested in startups and people who want to build something from the ground up. Why should they not be able to be afforded the benefit of having agency-quality content creators and strategies? I wanted to create a way to teach and train people, but I knew that in order to bring my best self to serve people, I needed to be creative and fulfilled and I wasn't. I gave myself as a creative sabbatical to wrap my poetry, make my art, get in touch with the stuff that lights me on fire so that when I could come back, I was able to serve.
Dustin
Was LA the only city, the first city? Where was it in the sabbatical process?
Lauren
I started in San Francisco for a few weeks, then it was LA and then I was hitting to New York on the 24th the day I didn't get on. I thought, “I'm going to meditate,” but then I decided that I wanted something fierier. I wanted to dominate. I changed my mind.
Dustin
I can appreciate that. Basically, how you described it as that there's nowhere else to go because you know your personality can flourish there. Lauren, I want to get into now how you look at the world. One of those things that I found that you talk about is this thing called creative structure. What is it? Why is it important?
Lauren
I started learning about creative structure from a man called Robert Fritz and he's got an incredible book, The Path of Least Resistance, which is a brilliant book for any business person. Creative structure the way that I see it is basically with the correct structure in place, it's having a vehicle that takes you where you want to go. How I tell my clients if I'm working with them, I'm the escalator. It doesn't matter who steps onto the escalator, I will take them to the top. The structure is in place. It's designed to take you where you want to go. What often happens is in business, people get worried about who the person is and how they feel. It's the wrong person for the job that they do not understand that if the structure of the company is sound. If there are systems in place, a person will thrive or they will fail.
Getting your system in place is more important than anything else you can do. That's looking at the creative structure of something. For example, if you're building a house, you could start by building willy-nilly or you hire an architect who gives you a brilliant blueprint and a plan and you know where things go. It doesn't matter who's laying the bricks or who's painting the walls. That can be a whole team. It can be a whole bunch of different people, but they're following a solid creative structure. I hope that paints the picture of what I'm saying.
Dustin
In business, I'm curious how far out you take it. Because entrepreneurs that jump in or businesses very early stage, they think they're in one business, they have a plan. Based on what you shared, oftentimes it's maybe that path of least resistance where it's like, “Maybe we need to pivot. We got customers over here saying we want this, not this other thing and they're willing to give us money.” How far out or how attached to you is that to that plan, that creative structure?
Lauren
I would say the creative structure falls into place of understanding where you are and ultimately where you want to be. How do you know that you've achieved what you want to achieve? What does that look like? The middle part of how you do that is completely subject to change. That can change a million different ways. I used to say, “I could paint while I'm doing dancing, do it in business. Ultimately, I'm here to do something specific. I want people to activate their creative genius, express themselves with their full potential. Now I do that in a variety of different ways. My business can pivot and change. That can be alternative offers, but I'm keeping my eye on the prize of that destination, that desired point of where I want people to move to.
If you think of it on a high level, it's like the client is starting and you say, “You're in LA but you want to take your business to London,” metaphorically speaking how you may get there as a variety of different ways of transportation. That's a creative structure. It's looking at that high level of where I am and where I want to go and your how can change. The problem is when you get very stuck. I need to do this and you get stuck in process and problem solving that you take your eye off creative vision and destination.
Dustin
I want to follow up with you on this. Is this also about lifestyle design? If you want to design a certain business to meet your lifestyle requirements, maybe it's a traveling business or maybe you only want to work on Mondays or to insert whatever it is. Is this part of the equation?
Lauren
You can't deny the link between personal and professional. It's all tied up together. Instead of getting stuck in the minutia of the how-to is you start getting clear on your desire and expanding upon those. When you've defined how it feels in that success state, you're then able to create toward that, but you need to know exactly what that is. Otherwise, you're going to create a business that starts to run you. You’re completely overwhelmed and you've got no time and you managing people and you're not doing the thing that you truly love to do. That's because you've taken your eye off the actual initial intention. Keeping clear on that helps you to make strategic decisions then. Does this fit in? Does this suit my structure? Is this the best thing to take me where I want to go? Continuously checking in with yourself.
Dustin
Lauren, are you up for some role-playing? I want to make this fun and exciting for you, maybe a little different. A lot of people, at least in my walks of life working with clients and in the past, they would come to you and they might say something this. Imagine I'm your client. I say. “Lauren, I love to travel. I'm exiting corporate. I’ve got some savings and I’d love to have a $1 million business that actually makes an impact in the world that helps lives be better. I want to be able to travel and pick up.” If I came to you with that vision or creative structure for my business, how would you help me? One, is that bad? Two, if it is, how would you help me get clear on that?
Lauren
Most people want to make a high income. They want a lot of independence and they want to create an impact. Our desires in life aren’t that different. We want big lives. A classic case of someone would come to me. I would start by helping them get specific on what that desire is. What is it that they want for themselves? The first question is always, “How can you give that to someone now? How can you create that for others?” We can get stuck in our own desires. It sounds so selfish but the minute you flip mode that and turn it around to how can you create that for someone else, you start to come up with actual service.
You start to meet your own needs by creating something that the rest of the world is going to want. I like to look at my client's pain points. I like to look at their suffering and take this suffering and flip mode that into ultimately their service solution. What would this person be struggling with? Are they not able to travel? Are they feeling stuck? Are they fear-based? What's going on? We would get to the core of that and that's going to be the answer. That's going to be the seed to plant and whatever flourishes from that within their own experiences and their setbacks in their struggles is going to be their tailor-made solution either in terms of a service offering or a product that's going to meet the needs of thousands of people. They start with themselves as a case study and they've got to get honest about that.
Dustin
I may have picked up on something that I wanted to ask you a little bit later, so let's go a little deeper here. My understanding is you have an alternative approach to problem-solving. It's around flipping this. I want to go deeper here. Let's say I'm working on something. Maybe it is a business, a project at work or maybe I want to do investment or something. That's because that's what people come to Get WealthFit for, those areas. What is your alternative methodology for going about problem-solving?
Lauren
You don't need to solve problems when you have a clear creative vision. We're told all the time in marketing to solve a problem, but we get stuck in problems in this oscillating pattern of solving a problem, having a new problem. You're stuck in a hamster wheel going nowhere. Whereas when you define what the actual vision is, a lot of the problems can fall away. For example, the person comes and says, “I want to travel. I’ve sold this business and I want this.” When they get clear about what they want, they may be able to do it. They don't even need to have all the things they think that they need because they're fixated on what the problems could be and they don't realize that what they want is accessible right here, right now. With one tiny shift, they've got that. Once they've got that, what is it that they want? I try to get my clients to focus and reframe things differently because the problems almost take care of themselves when you get clear on something. I find that the most problems we face in life when we’re feeling the most stuck are because we're in the wrong paradigm. We're legitimately on the wrong track.
Sometimes you've got to take a step to the left or slightly go in a diagonal direction and you're in a whole new trajectory and the road ahead is completely clear. If you keep coming up against these obstacles and these struggles and something isn't working, you need to shift directions. I'd say that's my different approach. What is the creative direction you can take that isn't linear between this and that, between a have to or a should or a must? There's a whole spectrum. There's a rainbow of possibilities. It's not black and white. It's all the colors of the rainbow and all the shades. What are you not seeing? What's not obvious to you that are potentially more obvious to me because I'm not coming from your paradigm?
Dustin
I have the million-dollar, billion-dollar follow-up to that. Lauren, many of us are fast-moving. There are social media, there are many distractions out there. It is hard not knowing what you know. It is hard to make the time to come up with that vision. How do you get your clients? How do you get others to make the time to slow down? That's what it requires to get that crystal-clear vision. What's your trick? What's your methodology here?
Lauren
I like to go right into the docks. I'm not going to tell you to make a vision board or do anything that's light and lovely. I’ll ask, “Where does it hurt? Tell me what you're scared of. Tell me what you're ashamed of. Tell me what you didn't get that you want. Tell me what's wrong with the world or people need to know.” Let's go into that actual pain because that's the muck that we tend to distract ourselves from. No one wants to deal with the bad feelings. It's much easier to distract or get fixated on external and other and things in the world. What hurts in you? Because that's going to tell me what's truly important and valuable to you. For example, I'm obsessed with creativity, expressing myself. I want to express myself. That's going to tell you to a person who's done a bit of in work.
I clearly didn't always feel I was able to express myself. I felt trapped by circumstance, by situations, by constructs. I have this urgency to express myself. When I go into that and give myself that freedom to do that, not only live a more vibrant, alive lifestyle, but I give others permission to do the same. If I was born always feeling like, “It's safe to express yourself, to say how you feel, to be who you are, not to be judged,” I wouldn't be doing it in the magnitude and in the way that I'm doing it. Everyone's got something special and unique, but it's probably something that they don't want to admit off the bat. They'll say something like, “I want to help the world. I want to solve this,” but they're not telling the truth. A great question is like, “What don't you want to say? What are you not allowed to tell me? What don't you want to admit even to yourself?” You then start getting into the magic. That's the alchemy. Those are the ideas in the dark that turn into your gold. It's a hero's journey. It's a brave place to explore those places, but it's juicy, it’s exhausting.
Dustin
You mentioned the word, alchemy, and you talk about business alchemy. I want to spend some time here. Explain alchemy because not everyone has read The Alchemist and knows what that means. Explain what it is and then your version of it as it relates to business.
Lauren
Alchemy is a term that means you can turn lead into gold. An alchemist would be a person who uses the philosopher's stone and the magic elixir that is able to transmute lead into gold. I love the word transmute because it's much more powerful than transform. A lot of people speak about transformational solutions or products and transformation is one thing. Transmutation means it's an entirely different thing for even more. Transmutation would be like a butterfly that goes into a chrysalis. It completely becomes goo, like a soup of possibilities, and then it emerges as something that is entirely different. There is no going back. It's not a transformation, it's a whole transmutation. Lead becomes gold.
In business alchemy, it's looking at that and going, “How do you transmute an idea that is an intangible idea in your head? How do you conceive of it and cultivate it that you can bring it into the world?” You can create it, you conceptualize and you conceive of it and it becomes real and your idea becomes gold. It makes you money. You make money with this thing that is this floaty idea. That's magic to me. That is a powerful process and that's what I would call business alchemy. Taking your idea and turning it into gold. If you have a service, it's taking suffering, something that's lead and heavy and weighs you down and plagues you. That feels overwhelming and transmuting that into something that is light, lovely, golden, expressed, and inclusive. It's something that has a massive benefit for the whole world. It starts with the lead. That's your raw material. I love the lead because without it, there is no gold.
Dustin
How would you know if it is gold or maybe the material you're working with isn't lead and it doesn't translate? What's your process for helping pick or figure out is this a great idea that will yield itself in gold?
Lauren
There was a whole conceptualization stage in terms of ideas. One of the things I love to tell my clients are everyone has ideas. So what? No one cares. You can have a billion ideas, but there's a process of conceptualization where you tip out all your ideas, you start sorting through them and you start to go, “What can be combined? What can be condensed? What can be reshaped? How do I start to mold this together into something which becomes the one big idea?” One big idea is usually a combination of a lot of little ideas. A client may come to me and they have a part of the idea, a piece of the puzzle, but it's not the full idea yet. We spend a lot of time, that's that strategy session and section of it working on that idea because the more fleshed out and the more concentrated that is, the rest flows more easily.
If you invest in that timeframe and getting that solid, then the process is quicker from there. If the process isn’t going smoothly, you need to go back to the drawing board and you need to look at that and go, “Is this what I'm saying? Is this what I want to achieve?” then it flows. Also, as I'm saying this to you, it's a science and art. There wasn't a quick fix like, “Write down ten ideas, and combine three.” There's not a formula but it's an organic process that I work on with the client.
Dustin
You have an amazing way with words and ideas. One of your ideas I wanted to ask you about, which is this idea of collaborative consumption. What is that? How can we benefit from collaborative consumption?
Lauren
Collaborative consumption is such a great word and I do love language. Words are the spoils of our lives. We literally are creating realities with the words we choose. I love getting into words. Collaborative consumption was a term that I heard back in 2012. It was coined by a woman called Rachel Botsman in Australia and she wrote a book called What's Mine is Yours. It's all about the shared economy. How are we all starting to do more and more with less and less due to network technologies, connecting strangers? In your own life, an example would be the fact that you're able to call a Lyft or call an Uber at the touch of a button. You don't need to have a car, put gas in, have a license, have a garage to store it, have insurance. You're able to get to where you want to go through a service that takes you there.
That's an example of collaborative consumption and we're doing that not in terms of how we drive, but in terms of how we travel. You would use Airbnb. You'd be able to rent out an empty space that's sitting there in someone's home that has ample capacity. They're able to make money out of it and you're able to save by not going through traditional methodologies. Collaborative consumption is like let's consume together. How do we share together? How do we pull resources and share in a way which we can do in a way which feels good because humans love to share, but between strangers? How do we build trust between strangers? This is where it gets interesting because we start looking at alternative currencies. Trust as a currency, reputation as a currency because you're able to vet different car rides or places you stay or products you buy online by leaving reviews for people and it goes both ways. It's the seller and the buyer both going, “This was my experience.” We’re able to form a whole new sharing economy with collaborative consumption. That's a condensed version of it.
Dustin
You made it incredibly tactical in terms of how do you benefit from this in your business focusing on reviews or even putting a review program in place or taking part in those programs. That's a way to build this alternative currency that people are using to make decisions in this new collaborative consumption economy. Was that a good summation of what you said?
Lauren
What you said is a perfect way to do that. Sharing in the collective like what is a way for people to share. One thing I love about anything that encourages us to be together is to create a community. This is fundamental in businesses going forward. No matter what your businesses, what is the community around your product or service? How do you invite people into a collective so that they're buying into more than the tangible? They’re buying into an ethos; they buy into that brand, that feeling sense. You can create communities around whatever you do. That's going to create a lot of goodwill; a lot of advocates for your business and you're going to start to get people almost working for you for free because they are going to be promoting what you do because they love it. They have a relationship with it. We do that when we feel in the community with something. Social media is such a beautiful place to translate that. I would say that's huge for anyone reading is what community are you cultivating? How are you inviting people to be part of something greater than the thing that you offer? There's longevity involved.
Dustin
Are we allowed to talk about the book that is coming out?
Lauren
The book that is coming out got pivoted and the book that is coming out became a whole business school for purchase. The book was concentrated and intense and then after it came back from the editor and I was going through it again thinking, “I'm going to release this for Christmas.” I realized that this information is going to be best done when I stick to my own advice, in the community, within a group, and when you don't have to do it alone. I have changed that book in particular that you are talking about, which is all about strategy and starting up and create a direction. It has become my signature program, which is called Simply Irresistible: How to Create and Sell Multiple Irresistible Offers and Keep Your Clients Coming Back for More. It's all the information but in a more digestible, playful way. Because I thought the way I like to access information is in a way that feels playful and lovely and magical. I’ve taken all of that and it has been transmuted into a connective community.
Dustin
I love that because one of the things that you also talk about is these things like setbacks. I don't know if this is necessarily a setback, but you had an intention for it to be something. You got some feedback and then here you go, you transmuted it. I also know you have a strong point of view on setbacks in business and in life. Will you share your point of view? Why do you think they're valuable to us?
Lauren
A lot of times people call things a setback or a sacrifice or a struggle, but it's that fertile ground which your raw material does well and that's your stuff, that's your lead, that's your opportunity. Everything's an invitation. When you start approaching things in a curious, more playful manner, it's more like, “What is this offering me?” I could go, “I didn't do my book,” that's a failure, but I took the information and took it to a whole other level. It became something far greater than I even anticipated because it found its full expression. We make it fixed on the outcome of exactly how it needs to be. I knew I had a message to share with the world and I thought, “I'm going to put this together into a book,” and I did, and then there it was and I thought, “Is this the true answer? Is this the fullest expression? There’s more here and then I was able to expand upon that and create something bigger than I ever anticipated. I thought, “I’ll have a book out by Christmas.”
I had no idea what that was going to mean when I started on that journey of how I wanted to serve. “I'm going to open a business school for coaches. I'm going to be on NBC on the morning show, talking about being a coach.” I didn't know that's where it was going, but that's what happened because I had such a clear, creative vision in mind that I let the how to unfold in its own way. I'd say to anyone who's thinking, “I had such a setback in 2019. This didn't work out how I wanted.” I'd say that's your raw material. That's your lead. This is what's ripe for transmutation. What can you glean from that? How can you use those setbacks as stepping stones to step up to take yourself to the next level? Because nothing real is ever lost. Everything can either point you in a new direction or be repurposed or reconfigured into something far greater than you ever thought it could have been to start with.
Dustin
100% that's the story of my life. That's the story of all of our lives is seeing those opportunities. I want to check in with you about this because when we last chatted, you said you were working on a money program. Has that transmuted? Are you still working on a money program?
Lauren
I did a short program for a collective that I was a part of in South Africa called Future Females. They're in an international group now. I did create a mini segment of my money manifestation program for them. The money program is something that I do have in the cards for the second quarter of 2020. I love money magic. It's such a gorgeous dynamic to play with and deepening your relationship with money, understanding how it works, getting in touch with that energy so that there is that abundant flow is something that has completely worked wonders for my business. It's why I'm able to take such huge risks. While I don't advise anyone taking a creative sabbatical and blowing all their money on making tons of stuff, traveling and going nuts, I didn't know that. Even when I had blown everything, I knew it was an opportunity to build myself up and start over again because I understand the principle of how money works and what that attraction. What do you need to do to attract it to you? Money manifestation is a big part of my business. It's something I pay with and train my clients and making their money. There will be a money course.
Dustin
I know this is asking a lot in such a tight interview here, but when it comes to money and people's relationship with it, at the highest level, what do people need to know? Said differently, Lauren, where do people drop the ball with their relationship in money?
Lauren
This may sound strange. I'm requesting that you will have an open mind with this, but money is linked to desire. What is linked to desire is often shame. What is the shame around money? What is the pain? What are their beliefs? What are the have-to, shoulds and not alloweds? What are the meanings that you've attached to money that is potentially holding you back? It can be as simple as you're greedy if you want money or you're selfish or you're unkind or money is the root of all evil. It's different for every person. What are you not allowing yourself? What makes you go, “That's bad, that's wrong?” When do you come up against a hard place? When you find your money age, that's your cage, that's your construct. That's the thing which is keeping you trapped, stuck, and small.
I would submit that it's got to do something with shame aspects. When we start to get more in touch with your desire, your allowing, your ability to receive, and to get in touch with that want, then your money framework starts to expand and you're able to bring in more. It's an intricate process. It's delicate and it's delicious. If this triggers something in you, but you learn how to fall in love with money, now that either can sound exciting and intoxicating or can sound like bless me when I’ve said, “What you did, that's terrible.” That's going to start to point to what are the areas of your life that you are keeping yourself small because you think it's keeping you safe but in reality, it is keeping you stuck.
Even what you think you want is limited by this cage perspective and you're not seeing the full magnitude of what is available for you. You can't even know what you want if these things are making you feel trapped. You're looking at a fraction of what's possible for you instead of peeling back the curtain and seeing the full picture. You can't know it because you're scared. You're trapped in a construct. That's when it's my job to help clients identify what those areas are and then dissolve them. Not smash them crash them but dissolve them multiple ways that they feel softer and more open to embrace what’s there for them.
Dustin
We cover a lot of tactical stuff around money, investing, entrepreneurship here on Get WealthFit. Even beyond this, I’ve never heard money being linked to some version of shame. At the same time, I think of the breakthroughs that I’ve had around money, having made lots of money and then losing lots of money or being taxed on it or whatever it is. I can relate to that. That's incredibly powerful to investigate your own beliefs around money. Because you may make a lot, but you might not hang onto it and there's probably a pattern or there's probably a story there. Is that correct?
Lauren
It’s 100% going to be a story. There's going to be some form of pattern that you're in, some form of black money rhythm that you're in. For some people, no matter how much they get, they never feel it's enough. They never feel that sense of safety. It never feels good. It's identifying those things to have an entirely new relationship with money. Desire and shame, as strange as it seems, are like keys to accessing what this is.
Dustin
You have an incredible background, performing arts center in South Africa, LA now. You've got a coaching business. You've been on TV. You've got programs. You speak all over. I have to ask you about this because it's fascinating to me and it calls to me. You worked with Techstars. For folks getting to know what that is, it’s essentially an incubator for founders to go through that have business ideas so that they can be incubated and get resources and mindshare. You went and you coached some founders. How did that come to be? What the heck did you share with them?
Lauren
That was an amazing experience. I still am actively involved in Techstars and I still am available to do pitch coaching for them. I was an associate for the programs, so it's a three-month accelerator program which basically jam-packs two years of growth into three months. It's a model that I’ve implemented going forward. I work with clients one on one for business optimization. I give them a personalized accelerator program. I love this model. It's concentrated and it's powerful. Techstars, unlike other accelerators and incubators, have a 90% success rate, which is an upsurge in terms of the startup world because all of them fail. It’s a powerful program. It's mentorship-driven. Aside from the 80 or 90 mentors that they get access to during this time, they have a team of associates. I was an associate in Techstars, South Africa and then I became the pitch coach.
What I did is I worked with the founders on getting them pitch-ready so that when demo date came and they had to perform for an audience to raise millions of dollars for the startup, they felt confident, relaxed. They’re in a place where they could share with authority, credibility, but also with the connection. Because what tends to happen with a lot of my clients who are geniuses, they're in their head, which makes it awkward for them. They don't want to be on stage. They're not performers. The last thing they want to do is be a showman. They want to be behind their computer. They're smart people. It's required if you're raising finance that you do need to connect with people. Connecting with an audience is tricky.
It's an exponential version of one-on-one. I work with them. It's weird. It takes them a while to adjust because I have some strange methods and techniques, but luckily they trust me because there was nothing that I asked them to do that I haven't done or wouldn't do with them. My results have spoken for themselves. I’ve taken twenty different founders to the place where they've raised millions of dollars. I'm credible. That's always good. I give them the numbers and the date. They know that I know what I'm doing. They trust the strange process. One of the first things we do in the first session is we sit together and we look at the intention that they want the audience to feel. I say to them, “What is the gift of the feeling if you could put it into a word that you want your audience to feel once they've experienced what it is that you do?” It’s not what you do, not the solution, but give me a feeling state.
We get quiet and we get still and they'll come to a word where I want them to feel hopeful or I want them to feel safe or excited. They'll come up with a feeling. That is the intention that we then put into the box, which is the pitch, which is crafting a great solid pitch and making sure that all the content is correct and the slides look great. The bow around the top, the finesse, the packaging is how do they perform this, how do they present this in a way which they feel comfortable? I'm giving you a few little tips now, but the main that they can do is to realize that they are there to deliver the gift, to deliver the feeling.
They are the messenger. They are not the main show. It's not personal. They are the delivery person. Whether that platform was on a stage or it's on a podcast or it's on live on Facebook or it's on TV, they are there to deliver that feeling. When they keep that in mind, that pulls them through. It allows them to deliver with more ease and grace and confidence because it's not about them. It's about giving that to the audience. When you come in with that giving feeling, it puts you at ease and your audience feels good because they're receiving. It sets up this beautiful exchange dynamic where they’re receptive to receiving the person who's sharing. It forms a connection and then what happens is like magic. The audience wants to invest right back because they've been given and so they give. That’s when they’re able to close millions.
Dustin
That was incredibly powerful. I would have loved to have been a fly on the wall. I can see some of the heavy founders down there and work with you and your methods. That would've been fun. I could go on and on with you. You're easy to talk to and insightful. I'm grateful for having you here. I want to encourage people that want to continue the conversation to check out your website, LaurenWallett.com. There are tons of resources that I would love for you to share at LaurenWallett.com/freebies. What can folks expect to find when they go there?
Lauren
There's a whole bunch of great resources there. I’ve got my own podcast called The Creativity Coach, which has some great interviews with brilliant people. Robert Fritz is one of my guests and I do some teachings on that podcast. The freebies are a great place for some fun ways to spark some creative direction into your marketing strategy for your business and building your community online. If anyone wants to reach out to me directly, they're welcome to. My email address is Hello@LaurenWallett.com. I'm happy to chat with anyone of your readers if they need to.
Dustin
Lauren, thanks for being here at Get WealthFit. I want to acknowledge and say words of appreciation for being here, but even more than that is sharing your message with the world so that other people can have an impact and do their thing that they love to do.
Lauren
Thanks for having me.

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