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Michael O'Neal: Being Unemployable, YouTube Secrets & Automation Hacks

We are talking to a gentleman that has had over fifteen million downloads across podcasts that he's been associated with.

He's dealt with great such as Hines Ward of NFL Steelers of fame and he is a Porsche car enthusiast. He's a real and fun guy that you are going to love to meet.

My guest is none other than Michael O’Neal.

You are going to experience something completely different. I get grilled a little, but you're also going to notice it's more conversational. That speaks to Michael's way with the microphone to tell a great story. It is a lesson in how to communicate and how to be a masterful storyteller.

We get tactical with the things like what makes for a great interview and how to set that up. We also talk about being unemployable. We start with that transition and realizing, “I'm not great at working for others.”

We talk about what are some of those markers and the plunge into being fully unemployable. We also cover football, which is easy for me personally to do. There are some incredible storytelling and lessons to be learned in talking about some good old-fashioned football. There are two other things that you want to pay close attention to.

We get into YouTube and the opportunity to leverage it to make money. It's a lot easier than I thought and I think you'll find it as well. If you want to get your time back in life, you're going to love the automation hacks that are available to all of us. You definitely are going to want to hear this no matter what you're into because this is about getting your time back.

With that said, let's get to it.

Dustin
It's 2004, you bounced around the country and for a good bit. You're making a living doing design and web development when both of your parents fell ill. Take us back to this point in your life and how the story unfolds.
Michael
I was hired off the couch. I was a freelancer and my brother said there was a job posted. I was living in Boulder, Colorado. There was a job posted. A startup needed a creative director. It was all the things that I did. I gave them my resume and I showed them my design work and they brought me in. I ended up getting hired. I think there were 300 applicants and I was hired as creative director for what would become a Fortune 500 startup and it was called Webroot software. I was employee number 67. By the time I left one year later, it was 330. It was a rapid growth. Being a freelancer that had read Rich Dad, Poor Dad and Cashflow Quadrant, I started to get a little bit of a glimpse of the other side. I realized that I was unemployable about three months in. They realized I was unemployable about six months in and then we both tried to make it work for another six months. That was that and I got a little, “Come on down, bring your playbook” thing.
I remember the day before my first mortgage payment, that’s the day they laid me off, which is pretty fun. That happened. That particular income dried up and then two sick parents in the US health care system. They both passed away within a few months of each other. It was very devastating from financial, emotional and all the different planes that you could be devastated. You hear people say, “I wouldn't change a thing.” I wouldn't mind changing a few things. I wouldn't mind them living another ten, fifteen years. That would have been great. That would've been awesome to have them through. I was 35 at the time. They got sick when I was 33.
Dustin
Did you have to go to them?
Michael
They were in Florida. We grew up a little bit not too far from each other. At the time they were living in Spring Hill, Florida, Hernando Beach. I was living in Colorado and I would have to go back and forth. It's one of those things where if anybody's ever freelanced, you know that there's this fine line between getting your work done. It's like networking and filling the funnel, getting the work done and then taking care of past clients and mining that also for work. If one of those areas gets disrupted, it hoses you. For four years I was back and forth to Florida. I went from a pretty connected hip location in Boulder to Spring Hill. It was 2004, they didn't have internet at their house. You could go to a coffee shop, but it was just starting to come around.
I'd have to drive twenty minutes to some coffee shop somewhere on US-19 and when they closed at 4:00, they shut the internet off too. I couldn't do my work. It was a killer. The funnel dried up. I lost a lot of the work. I sold everything I had to try to make mortgage payments on this house that I bought not too long before and none of it works. I lost the house, the cars, the 401(k). Pretty much all the money went away. I did a podcast on this about the loss and how loss like this has affected me for many years. There are a couple of big lessons. One lesson that will never be forgotten was I was probably at my lowest place and I was feeling down. I said, “What am I going to do? This sucks.” This was about when my dad was on the very final throes, but my life was already in chaos.
Dustin
Did you move there?
Michael
No. I was still in a popular working band while I was there and still doing my thing. I’m trying to maintain and stay above the water as much as I could. I remember being in this crappy spot and thinking, "Why did this happen to me?” Then hurricane Katrina hit and I'm walking by. I remember exactly where I was. I walked downstairs and I looked over. CNN was on and they were showing live footage of all this stuff that was happening. There was a little nine-year-old, skinny, black kid standing on the roof of a two-storey house waiting to get rescued. Fourteen of his family members had died. All of his brothers, sisters, parents and his grandparents. Their bodies are floating by him. I'm looking and I'm thinking about my life and then I'm thinking about his life. I said, “For everything I think is going poorly for me right now, that kid's got it worse on so many levels.” That taught the lesson of always compare down and then, for every person that feels, "Why did this person get into a car accident, die or get sick? Why did this happen to me?” For every person like that, there's somebody that had it equal or worse that's done incredible and amazing things with it. Your choice is to live there or to pick yourself up by your bootstraps.
A great lesson for this is I hosted a show with NFL Great, Hines Ward, for a year. Hines left the NFL. I decided to do an Ironman Triathlon. This is to get inside the mind of a champion. He hired an eleven-time Ironman champion to be his coach, as a successful person does. They hire way up and he was doing the Ironman. Football is super fast twitch and power-oriented while Ironman is slow twitch and long endurance-oriented. He had never done anything like this. He might as well have been a non-athlete. He’s no advantage of being an NFL player other than the brain. That's where this comes in. He got on a bike, he got into the pool, he ran and he trained. People run, typically we would run a few miles a day and feel pretty good, but it's different. An Ironman triathlon is a three-mile swim, then a full 100-mile bike ride, then a full marathon of 26.2 miles in the same day.
Dustin
You talk about physical pain, the mental power you have to have to get through that day.
Michael
You're going to feel pain. That's one of those things where someone is a new entrepreneur and they go, “What if it doesn't go right.” I'm like, “It's not going right. Unquestionably, it's going to fuck you up.” He did the swim, he was fine. He did the bike well and he's on the run. Now, he's later than he was supposed to be. They had timed him. We don't know where he is. His coach gets on a bike and rides back to him. He’s a few miles out and he's crawling. His body has broken down. He has gone to the bathroom. His body is breaking. He's crying like he's just destroyed. He looks at her and he says, “I don't know what to do.” She just looks at him and says, “You get up and you put one foot in front of the other and you finish this race.” That's what he did. He got up, he put one foot in front of the other and he finished this race. That piece was burned in by my dad. The giving up part was never a thing. I switch into very resourceful mode when stuff like that's happening. If rent’s due in two days, I'm going to figure out how to pay rent.
Dustin
When does it kick in though? Is it last minute for you? Is it the last conceivable? Can you pre-empt this?
Michael
I don't know. Maybe smarter people could.
Dustin
For some people, it takes that.
Michael
I'm almost a stress-free human until I go, “I should pay attention to this.” I met this interesting guy randomly. A friend of a friend said, “This guy I know has a lot of companies.” We talk on the phone and he said something that was interesting to me. He said, “I built my fortune in the cable industry.” If you know anybody that's nouveau riche or does well or has a cool house, the phrase “Built my fortune” is different. What you'd hear from a guy that flipped a bunch of houses is “We did well,” or something like that. Saying "Built my fortune” non-ironically is immediately an eyebrow-raiser. You’re just going to go, “That's interesting.” I don't know much about him at all. He tells me to meet him. I went to his house. At the time, I was out of all money. I'd sold my cars. I scraped together $7 in gas money and borrowed my buddy's Toyota truck to drive from Boulder to the Denver Tech Center where there's a McCormick and Schmick's and this guy had the penthouse at the top of it.
That was his little Denver spot to stop. I knocked on the door and he answered the door. He's probably mid-60s, white hair down to his mid-back, with white beard, like a little Gandalf. He's wearing pajama bottoms, Abercrombie and Fitch football jersey shirt, and probably a $2,000 Gucci loafers or something. I stepped in and he has that aloof confidence of someone who's been in that situation and he said, “You're welcome. Wait right here.” I'm like, “I'm going to wait right here.” I'm standing in his kitchen and I look over and there are five pictures on his kitchen wall. It's him with Carter, him with Reagan, him with Bush, him with Clinton and him with Bush. I have no idea who this guy is. I can't disclose too much. Even if I told you his name, he would be almost impossible to find. He's a very secretive dude. I went to school at Tampa University. I studied the cable industry. My degree is in broadcasting, telecommunications and mass media, even though I didn't do that first, I was a web guy.
I tell him about my story and then I say, “What about you? Where did you your start?” He goes, “I was working at Time Warner in the ‘70s and I had a friend who was getting out of the military. He had access to a military satellite. We thought, 'Wouldn't it be cool if we could figure out a way to beam a television signal to a satellite and then you could watch it in another place on the planet?'” I thought, “That's how TV works.” I said, "This guy is infrastructure rich.” He was friends with Ted Turner guy. You’ll never see him on a radar, but he's probably a multibillionaire. I think if you're watching television, 0.00001 pennies go into his pocket and then multiply that right on the Earth. I'm sitting on his couch. This is 2008 in December. My dad had died December 2006, my mom died September 2007, eight and a half months apart.
I'm leveled and I sit on this guy's couch and I'm just to survive and I had this goal as a “successful adult.” My dad was the guy that would drive a Winnebago cross country but wouldn't jump on a flight to Paris for six hours. They'd never been to Europe. They'd never been anywhere. I said, “I'm going to take them to Europe. That would be cool.” They died so I couldn't. This guy said, “If you want to make a $250,000 a year, marry some cute girl and live in Boulder, we can make that happen in a second.” I was like, “Great, sign me up.” He said, “Normally I would do that, but you're a bad investment.” He said, “You've had so much chaos in your life for the last four years that you haven't had a chance to mourn.” I swear to God, that was the first moment as a human walking on the planet that I said, “My dad died and my mom then died.” I broke down on his couch for the first time. I didn't cry a tear since then. It was that thing that hit me well.
On this stranger's couch, I decided to take my parents to Europe. I got their ashes. I put them in a little Italian cheese shaker. I still have it if you come visit my house in San Diego. I flew to Europe for four months and spread them everywhere. They’re on the beaches of Normandy, they’re in the Sistine Chapel. Sometimes I had to go a little Shawshank Redemption. You're not allowed to spread ashes in the Sistine Chapel. I’m flipping it over my shoulder. It was intentionally cathartic time where I just took it. It was a thing where I had ceremony after ceremony like Notre Dame Cathedral. I grew up Catholic, so it’s a big deal. I had them blessed by a Vatican priest. That would have been a big deal to my mom. My dad won't give a shit. My dad was just a little bit too young to fight in World War II. This is very generational. He carried guilt about it his whole life. He was just a little bit too young for it. He was born in 1928. He was sixteen or something where you couldn't quite go.
He was guilty about it his whole life. Something else happened where once he was of age, something else was going on and he was exempt. He carried that with him. I said, “That's an interesting take on patriotism.” That whole idea that's like, “I wanted to go fight war.” I came back from that trip of all these amazing experiences and on my connecting flight from Brussels back to Boulder, I stopped in Washington, DC and I had $14. My brother picked me up from the airport and I'm sitting on his guest bed. It was like the end of Princess Bride when Inigo Montoya has killed the six-fingered man. His buddy Wesley says, “What are you going to do now?” Inigo says, “I don’t know. I’ve been in the revenge business my whole life.” That's how I felt. I’ve been in this gig doing web stuff since 1994, so I'm pretty good. It’s thirteen, fourteen years into this career. I'm like, “If I never have to work another hour for a dollar again, I won't.” Super long story short, I met some people that were into internet marketing and network marketing. I combined those into this little world.
Dustin
I got to ask about this mysterious figure. What did he see in you? Why didn't you go back to him when you landed to set up that $250,000 thing or something else?
Michael
I’ve called him a couple of times. I'm confident he doesn't even know what he did. This guy was so many levels above of certainly everybody I know. I don't know anybody that's at that level. It'd be like knowing Bill Gates personally or something. Maybe not quite, but certainly. During our conversation, I told him my whole story and then he told me his. He got up and he said, “Michael, gambling is illegal in whatever and however many states.” He said, “What do you consider gambling?” He said, “To whatever commission, gambling is Poker, Blackjack, etc.” He goes, “However, mahjong or whatever other games that people can bet on are not considered gambling games.” His company has created 40 non-casinos all around the country that has baccarat and mahjong or whatever.
He goes, “There is a proposal from my company to buy the rights to the buildings and the land that the casinos are on. This is going to buy the whole operation. It was something like $20 billion or something.” He plopped it on the thing and he goes, “What if I asked you to run it?” I’ve told this story before and people are like, “Why didn’t you do it?” I told him about this little Porsche thing I wanted to do. He saw me light up. He was like, “That's cool.” I’m like, “Not really.” He says, “Why not?” I said, “I don't want to stand around in a smoky building with $4,000 Armani suit fourteen hours a day. That's going to get old quick.”
Dustin
We’re you 30 at the time?
Michael
I was 35, 36.
Dustin
You've got some wisdom, but that's some good foresight there.
Michael
He paused and he said, “That's why you're going to be a multimillionaire.” I’m still not super financially motivated. It's not always been my thing. My buddy is a super connected dude. He knows everybody and very well respected in the entrepreneurial community. He came over one day and I was working on one of my cars, which is one of my hobbies. He said, “More than anybody else I know in this entire industry, you do more things you love on a regular basis.” I'm like, “I don't know that there's a higher compliment than that.” I know if there's an area of improvement for me, it's that. I'm like, “I should be a little financial motivated.” I do have expensive taste. I have things that I want to do that I’m like, “I can't do that.”
Dustin
With the Porsches and what you're up to, do you come at it like, “I'm going to do this passion and then I'm going to monetize it?” or you're like, “I'm going to do what I love and then maybe I’ll monetize it?”
Michael
It's probably somewhere in between those two. When I restored my first early 9/11, I took full Rich Dad, Poor Dad and because I was a designer, I designed some cool Porsche t-shirts. I found an audience forum which has all these Porsche message boards and sold out. I made $4,000 so that I can finance the part of the restoration. That was a little bit of Rich Dad, Poor Dad. Let your hobbies pay for themselves. I’ve always had that, but now I'm getting to the point where I'm much more tactical about it. If you see me do a video especially on The Solopreneur Hour YouTube channel, I'm definitely going to help for the most part. If it's gear related, I’m looking for that affiliate action.
I'm starting to make a pretty good little nest egg with Amazon affiliate stuff with all of these videos I’ve done teaching people to podcast or how to use a mixer for a podcast or six things not to do. They all link back to my gear stuff either on Kit.com or on Amazon. It was an afterthought for a while and now I haven't made a car payment on my Porsche Panamera since I bought it. YouTube has paid for insurance and car payments. I was like, “I like that. I like free car.” I like the idea of me putting a video out on how to get a free Porsche from YouTube, but that's down the road a little bit. I decided that I want to build that particular income to be the wealth income. The real Rich Dad, Poor Dad. That's going to cover my expenses, those payments.
Dustin
Do you want to do that because it's what you're most passionate about, you'll spend hours doing it and it will be easy?
Michael
No, it's easy to do. YouTube is so hackable. Everything requires some effort. Once you crank a YouTube video out, you know how to speak on the video to keyword it, you know what category it's in and you know the gear, it's a little money engine for you.
Dustin
I want to break this down a little bit because I know you're bullish on YouTube. You're this amazing podcasting guy. It's funny to me that your media of choices is YouTube.
Michael
I like to speak into a microphone for a living. I'm not choosy where the microphone is. It can be on a podcast studio, on a live stage or in front of a camera. I'm very good at communicating and I'm good at explaining things. If I need to explain why the shoulder of this microphone is shaped in this way to someone who doesn't even know that microphones have shapes, I could be good at that. Even if I'm not a completely seasoned expert at it, it's a thing I can go, "Here's why.” I think I'm a teacher that never got into a classroom.
Dustin
These YouTube videos, you mentioned something that I thought were a little far away from. It's how to speak in the video so that it's keyword-friendly. I know YouTube are transcribing videos.
Michael
That first fifteen to twenty seconds of any video are super important.
Dustin
Are you saying random keywords?
Michael
No, but you'll see people that are good. I might say something like, “Welcome to another episode of the show. I'm going to break down the ten best podcast microphones you can buy for under $300.” “Ten best podcasts microphones,” is the keyword. Best podcast microphone is what I'm aiming at in that sentence and it'll do it. The YouTube algorithm is rad. I don't know it and I don't know how it works, but what I know is if you do it right, it's cool to see the shelf. Do you know much about YouTube?
Dustin
No.
Michael
This is interesting. This is something I didn't know. I have friends that have big YouTube channels. I have one video called 6 Huge Podcast Mistakes that will kill your podcast.
Dustin
How do you come up with that?
Michael
I just know it because I’ve taught how to podcast for a long time. I was like, "Let me do this one.”
Dustin
How do you know to create this particular video versus five or three?
Michael
It doesn't matter. It’s what I came up with.
Dustin
You didn't do any research. You're just like, “This is it.”
Michael
I wanted to teach this and ultimately I wanted to sell my Art of the Interview course. I have an Art of the Interview course. I was like, “Let me do this. Maybe that will funnel into it.” This is what's interesting about this. I'm going to show you this, which is once I switched to this thing lifetime views, look at how long this thing hung out before YouTube decided it was a thing and then blew it up. He's looking at a chart right now. I put this video out December, 2018. It probably had 400 or 500 views by mid-April, 2019. By the end of April 2019, it had 10,000. YouTube swept it up. I don't know why. That video now has 73,000 views on it. It blew up.
Dustin
Are they all like this?
Michael
They're all like that.
Dustin
Why? I know you don't know this.
Michael
I don't know. One's in the process of happening right now. I took a 2009 Mac Pro computer, the big cheese grater. You can upgrade those things to make them into a modern ripping powerhouse machine for $1,000.
Dustin
You're taking the motherboard out? You're using the shell.
Michael
You're doing all the things. If I switched back to views and I show you what it looks like for lifetime, here we are again. I’ve got it spiked when it first came out and then hung out for a few months doing nothing and now it's hockey sticking, it's starting to fly.
Dustin
What's the back-end on that?
Michael
All Amazon links to all the different components. That's where I looked at this because I was looking at my Amazon affiliate and I sold eight Sapphire RX-580 video cards. I had no idea. That's what it is.
Dustin
I would have never imagined. I figured people watched the video and then they would type in to Amazon.
Michael
No, because you tell them, “By the way, if you want any of this gear, it's all in the description below.” Interestingly, my actual revenue from this video from YouTube lifetime is $14.99, from YouTube AdSense. My revenue from Amazon is $3,000. That’s the kicker. The smart move is to reverse engineer this. Look around and in my case, YouTube is giving me some credibility around gear and podcasting. I'm going, “You're going to be seeing some podcast gear reviews from yours truly pretty soon.” I’ll do a microphone shootout. How does the Shure SM7B compare to the Heil PR 40 compared to the AT 2020? I’ll do all those. I’ll tell people what a dynamic mic versus a condenser mic and why they should never choose a Blue Yeti. This is the mic you want right here, this Audio-Technica ATR 2100.
Dustin
What's up with the Blue Yeti? Is that because the Blue Yeti is often recommended?
Michael
They always recommend it and it's the worst microphone to recommend for most people because they're condenser mics. They will pick up an entire room. If you have kids running around or a dog, if a mouse farts in the next county, it will hear it.
Dustin
Is this for musicians? Who would want a condense mic?
Michael
They're great microphones. If we were in the studio with condensers, fantastic. The vocals can be crisper and you can also move around a little bit. Whereas with a dynamic mic, the second I move my face away from this thing, there are tons of rejection and you can't hear it. A condenser mic, you can move all around. If I'm snapping my fingers, you hear the whole room. You'll see in fancy recording studios, like in a vocal booth, it’s almost always condenser mics. They're like a Blue Yeti. They can sound great, but if you're not in an anechoic chamber at your house, you don't have soundproof rooms unless you're in a closet. I don't know where that all went, but that's basically the YouTube strategy. When you look at some of those people that are doing regular, I look at my buddy, Sean Cannell from Think Media. He's got ten videos on, "This is the best camera for YouTube vlogging.” He's got 1.5 million views on one, 570,000 on the other. That is easily worth $10,000 to $20,000 a month for just those four videos in passive residual.
Dustin
Is there a slap coming potentially? Do you think you benefited maybe from some algorithm change or because you have link?
Michael
They always tweak the algorithm. It happens all the time. One thing I like about it versus podcasting, podcasting is a very dense and challenging medium to get into because unless you're good at it, it's unhackable. YouTube is super hackable. Keywords, you can SEO your way to some YouTube success. You can’t SEO your way to podcast success.
Dustin
Why is this? There's too much competition on YouTube though?
Michael
It's true. One thing though is that numbers are much lower for podcasts. My beginner audio file podcast, which is one of my little side hustles which I don't take enough advantage of. That's an example of me doing something in the gear world that I could be crushing from an affiliate income. I haven't set the infrastructure up right.
Dustin
Is it weird to take that audio, leverage it and take the audio from that and upload it into YouTube?
Michael
That doesn't work. People try it. I’ve tried it. I did it for a year. It's a cool. That got 67 views in a year that it's been up. Nobody cares about talking heads. They don't care about your audio only on YouTube.
Dustin
Is there an SEO play or no?
Michael
The only way it ever works is when you do like what Joe Rogan does, where you have three-camera shoot podcasts. If we are doing what we're doing now and here's a bunch of cameras around and someone's switching them and we're doing a live stream on YouTube, that could play. It's a ton of work. There are people like, “I launched my podcast in February and March. I'm going to start my mastermind and then April, I'm going to start doing some live events.” Really? We'll see how that first month shakes out for you. Your 316 downloads are going to get to that show.
Dustin
I want to go back since we were on the topic of podcasting. How did the Hines Ward thing come to be?
Michael
Since I was a little kid, I’ve been a fan of the Pittsburgh Steelers.
Dustin
You're from Ohio, but you're not a Browns fan. You lived in Philly, but you're not an Eagle. How did the iron curtain get you?
Michael
No reason. I was this old. I have a picture of me at some birthday. I think I might have been five. I’m holding on my Steelers jacket.
Dustin
Was that dad’s influence?
Michael
Zero, zero for cars, zero for football. I have Steelers trashcan. My grandma got me a Bengals robe that I had to wear. You'd never think you'd be so excited for a trashcan. My brother got me the same trashcan when I turned 40. It was the best gift I’ve ever had. It’s vintage. It was from the ‘70s. Hines Ward was this gritty, half-Korean, half-black, maybe six-feet tall and played with a spirit that every other fan of every other team hated him and then also wanted him on there too. Wide receivers in the NFL are known to be divas. They don't like to block. They don't like to get dirty. They like to run their routes and catch the ball and score touchdowns. Hines was a wide receiver who sought contact. He wanted to. The Steelers were running team. When your football teams are running team, the wide receivers aren't catching the ball. They're responsible for blocking people.
Hines used to light dudes up. He would find them. They invented an NFL rule called the Hines Ward rule because he would come in from the side and destroy guys, break their jaws like he was a hitter. That didn't happen much. When he got nailed, he would just pop right up with his huge smile on his face, which is nothing more irritating than someone lays a lick on you and you're like, “Good hit,” you get up and run back. He was known for having this great spirit. He wins two Super Bowls. He becomes Super Bowl MVP. He was always the guy that moved the chains on third down. He was this great full representative of a Steelers play. He went into the Steelers Hall of Honor. It was a big deal with him, Bill Cowher and a couple of more guys. He retired from the NFL, became an Ironman triathlete. He goes on to become a CNN commentator. He opened a restaurant in Pittsburgh.
I always loved his entrepreneurial spirit and the fact that he was never afraid to try new things. He was always very emotional. There's this very famous video of him crying in the locker room because he was to get Jerome Bettis a title and they got beaten and their team was killer and it was the best team we've probably seen, the Steelers fans, at least in my lifetime, other than all the big Super Bowl winners. They should have won it. It was that game, it didn't work out for him. He was upset and he was like, “I wanted to get this for Jerome.” He stayed one more year and then they got him the ring. It was a cool story. He was always my favorite players. He is number 86 and it pops up in my life all the time. We all have these numbers that find us. For whatever reason, 86 found me all the time. I started racing in 2000. I was always number 86. That was always on the car. When I got my first 9/11 it became number 86. My podcast studio in North Park in San Diego was called Studio 86. Right behind was Hines Ward’s jersey hanging on it. It's very embedded.
I get a call from a buddy of mine and he says, “Have you heard Shaquille O'Neal's podcast?” I go, “I’ve heard of it but I’ve never heard it.” He goes, “It's like pop culture meets sports. I’ve been approached by another celebrity to launch a show, but I don't have the bandwidth for it. I thought you might. There might be a real opportunity to get an ad revenue share deal with this thing. I said, “That’s great. Who is it?” He goes, “This guy probably needs a co-host.” I'm like, “Who is it?” He said, “It is none other than number 86 himself, Hines Ward.” I’m like, “You’ve got to be kidding me.” Fast forward, I hosted Thrive 2016. I was at Thrive 2015. My dog had just died. That's what had happened. I jumped on a flight and before I know it, I'm sitting with Hines, his agent and his manager in a booth at a steakhouse thinking, “Where am I right now? This is crazy.” We talked about what the show could be and how it could be awesome and we decided to pull the trigger.
We launched The Hines Ward Show. I co-hosted it. Our first episode was Hines and Jerome Bettis, which was great. I'm trying to remember all these. We had Charles Barkley who was funny too. This is The Solopreneur Hour with Hines Ward co-hosting. That's what this show is because he doesn't know how to do any of this. He's not a broadcaster. I have to teach him how to tell a story and not be like the football answer guy. It’s like, “We need you to say words and tell stories and be honest and be transparent. That's what makes compelling pod here.” I go, “Charles, my name is Michael O'Neal. I'm hosting the show and you're on with me and Hines Ward.” He was like, “Michael, how are you doing?” He goes, “I don't know who you are, but I'm looking forward getting to know you better.” I said, “Thanks.” The best things in my life is getting a DM from Snoop because he's a huge Steelers guy. He's like, “What's up? You can connect with me and my people.”
On my birthday party, I got a DM from Snoop and I was like, “Happy birthday to me, everybody.” My favorite interview though was with General Michael Hayden. Anybody that was a Steelers fan we could pretty much bring on. We had some athletes and celebrities and things like that. I had Anthony Jeselnik and it was one of my most nervous interview. He was one of my favorite comics. He shit all over me right out of the gate. General Michael Hayden was the head of the CIA and NSA during the Bush administration. There are number of shows where it's the “How do celebrities treat you” thing because they don't know me at all. My litmus test is, are they nice to me as well or is it like “I'm here to talk to Hines,” which happened a number of times? A number of times, they were delightful and I got into these great conversations that I have normally had in my own show. I remember talking to General Michael Hayden and I’m going, "In my lifetime ever, I will never talk to anyone that knows more about how the world works than this guy.” He was the head of the NSA and CIA. He knows all the secrets.
Dustin
Are you going like full court press on him?
Michael
He knows more than the President. What am I going to get out of it? He got to keep it classified. We dug around it a little bit and he was as forthcoming as he could be. Hines was sometimes fed with questions from his agent and his manager, which are usually dog crap like, “What was it like being the head of the CIA?”
Dustin
Was it because he didn't prep?
Michael
That's why the show didn't last because the show was 98% me. I would have to come up with the ideas and the topics and carry the conversations and do all the thing. I said, "Hines, I'm not the one that had the fourteen-year career in the NFL. I don't know how to get into all the dirty stuff.” I think we did 56 shows. We had two or three that I thought were killer. One of the most iconic football plays in history, the one where Antwaan Randle El, they did a double reverse, then Antwaan pass it to him in the end zone. It was the big iconic Super Bowl 43 play. He broke down the real X's and O's of that and that was the first time I said, “None of us have any idea.” We think we know what's going on. Even if we're like a big fan, they dug so deep into one player’s psyche on that play on purpose. The Twitter version is they ran the same play twenty minutes prior.
The only job Hines had was to blow up this one safety and just nail them and make the hit close enough. Even if he got flagged for it, make the guy pissed. They just wanted to make him pissed off. Another three or four plays happened and a couple of more guys did the same thing. They have this one guy now that’s totally getting picked on and he's livid. Now he's headhunting. His playbook is abandoned, his strategy is abandoned. He just wants to kill players on the Steelers sidelines. That’s all he wants to do. They kept saying to cower him and Antwaan, saying, “You got to call it. He's ready.” You can tell. They could tell based on their film study that he was out of position and he was trying to hunt guys. It's all he was trying to do.
They get in the same exact formation they did twenty minutes prior where Antwaan Randle El had kept the ball and now the guy goes, “He's mine.” He's ready to light up Hines. He knows Hines is going to come and he's going to come at him and he's ready to light Hines up. They run the double reverse. Now instead of running, Antwaan Randle El arcs this perfect pass. The reason why Hines was fifteen yards open is because Hines ran right at the guy and the guy was like, “This is it.” Hines just jukes him and now he's wide open. They only did that because that guy was so pissed and they psychologically warfared him. I was like, “That whole plan was filmed and done in the meeting room the night before.” They were like, “If we need it, here's going to be a gadget play that we need to use.” It worked like a tee and I said, “That is so much deeper than you would think as a casual football fan.”
I love playing psychological games with one guy and six people are doing it. It's crazy. Welcome to football. I forgot that Eagles movie with Marky Mark. He was a sub and it was super cool. He kept getting lit up at the line. He kept getting blasted by guys. He did something and one of the veterans said, “When you're in your stance, you got to wear gloves.” He goes, “Why?” He goes, “When you're in your stance, if I see the whites of your knuckles, I know it's a running play.” Meaning he's putting five more pounds of pressure on his hand that's planted on the ground because he's going to go forward. If he's got to step up and block for passing, that means those hands are going to be regular. That's how nuanced it gets with these guys. They can tell, they look, they sit and study film and look for you to twitch your eyelash. If you twitch it one way, they're going to blast you. It's pretty cool. That's the Hines Ward thing. I live this Steelers fan like a dream.
Dustin
Were you all bummed when the show ended?
Michael
No, it was me.
Dustin
You called it?
Michael
I ran for the AFC championship where they'd got pounded by the Patriots again. I was in the airport. I posted this picture, which is me sitting with Hines at the AFC championship on January, 2017. I got some crap from his manager that I was trying to take advantage of his celebrity or something by posting it. I'm like, “I built all of this.” It was like, “Hines is there with CNN, don't bother him.” I literally talked to Hines for about three minutes in a three-hour game because he was up with the CNN people. That happened to me the minute that the guy that I was co-hosting a show with for a year and I had a conversation. I took a picture and I just said like, “I'm good with this. I'm going to clock out now,” but check it out. I’ve got a selfie with Tomlin. If you're a football fan, I’ve got me wearing Hines’ two Super Bowl rings. I’ve got me with James Harrison who is on Beast Mode. I follow him on Instagram for a very inspirational workout videos. It’s one of those things where you go, “This is what podcasting did. How did I get here?”
Dustin
When is the call from your buddy coming with the next celeb?
Michael
I don't know if I would do that again. I don't know if I would do the hosting world again. It'd be cool to do what Jordan Harbinger’s doing now. He's doing the show I want to do with bigger A-list guests. The ultimate tier of that is Off Camera with Sam Jones. He was a Hollywood photographer for twenty years. He's got all the A-list people. He has the show, which he says great deep dive conversation. He’s a killer interviewer and his whole guest list is everybody you would ever want. Tony Hawk to Robert Downey Jr. and everything in between.
Dustin
You coach a lot of people in the podcasting world. What do you want to say to guys and gals making lots of errors? What are the big ones?
Michael
You haven’t even plugged me yet. There are like four plug opportunities.
Dustin
You've been doing it so well yourself.
Michael
Do you know how awkward that is to plug yourself?
Dustin
“I’ve got this on the Solopreneur. I coach people,” these are great seeds.
Michael
If you did a straight up call to action like if people say, “Where can people find you?” Then you got to do that thing. It is as awkward as somebody bring you to a party and going, “Tell everybody about yourself.” You're like, “Thanks.” It'd been cool if you'll just intro me a little bit. “This is my friend. He's a real estate developer who loves cats.” Now, we've got context. A good high 90% are doing it pretty poorly. I think it's because some people have become popular in spite of their inadequacies.
Dustin
Was it because of other factors like social media following and email list?
Michael
They are good at making money, which means to me they're good salespeople and/or good marketers. It doesn't make them a good podcaster. This is maybe the difference between being good at it and being adequate and making it a piece of your marketing funnel. If you look at Episode 391 of the Smart Passive Income Podcast hosted by me. I'm interviewing Pat on this episode. He trusted me with the reins of his show to interview him because I'm his favorite interviewer. That's the stuff that happens when you're good at it.
Dustin
You’re getting these requests?
Michael
Because he had a conference and I thought, “It would be cool to do a behind the scenes thing and hear about what it was like for you to put the conference on.” I said, “We should do it.” He goes, “Let's do it on my show. It’s great, let's do it.” It's that stuff that I think is cool. Pat will always come on my show and vice versa. If I have something to promote, I can be like, “Can I do this?” He'll be like, “It will be nine months from now.” I can do that with most of the big marketing shows now because they trust that they can hand me the reins to a show and they got it. It's good. Probably better than them.
Dustin
It's quite obvious you're natural at it and you're great at it. You say the big things is I should be planting the guests better and I agree with you and also introducing the guests properly, which generally doesn’t happen in this live session but it will happen in the record.
Michael
The intro-outro? What you would do though is let's say I’ll use @WealthFit on Instagram. If I was interviewing you and you had said something like, “That was cool. It was interesting.” I might say something like, “I’ll make sure you guys follow @WealthFit on Instagram. DM him and tell him what you thought of that.” Give him an example of how you might have done the same thing. I want my people to follow that person. I always want the guest to feel coddled and catered to, especially if they're promoting something. It's been this endless pile of them like, “You can go to whatever website.”
I want to do that right out of the gates and I want to hit stop and then go, “That was so refreshing. You were so great to promote and plug.” I go, “Do you know anybody else that you think would be a good fit for the show?” They always have other cool A-list friends that they can email. There's no better way to get a great guest on the show. I do a little secret sauce of getting them to share it, which nobody does in 2019 anymore. As soon as it's done I go, “If you're willing to share this with your audience,” they will go, “Totally,” because they had a good time. I follow up and when I'm going to be putting it out, I send them an email. I go, “I appreciate you promising to share the show when it comes out. This is coming out tomorrow.”
Dustin
You already got him to commit to do that or are you assuming the sale right now?
Michael
You do it live. When we finished doing the show, I said, “Would you mind sharing this?” They say, “Totally,” because they feel good. They feel great. They'd been catered to. I promoted them. They'd been plugged. We've had a great conversation that hopefully is different and interesting. When the show comes out however long later, I email them and I say, “I appreciate you promising to share the show.” They go, “Okay.” You make it easy for them to share but then they usually do. That doesn't always happen.
Dustin
The short of those strategies there, what if I want to become better at this craft?
Michael
You nail your intro. That is the first thing. All of this has to do with that feeling of them feeling catered to. One of my favorite clips I have on my phone is Jimmy Fallon was with Michelle Obama and Jerry Seinfeld. He was introducing somebody to do this segment on his show. A couple of sentences that we can break down. He does so many things right. He says, “Our next guest has multiple Emmy-winning sketch comedy show. He’s one of the greatest sketch comedy shows of all time. His new Netflix specials are dropping August 12th at 8:00 PM. Ladies and gentlemen, Dave Chappelle.” Let's break that down. Number one, "Our next guest.” It's not, “Dave Chappelle is our next guest.” You would never utter their name first. You would always say our next guest or coming up on the show or our next speaker or any of that. It's always that first, then it's edify, “He has one of the most popular sketch comedy shows of all time.”
I have some context and not only did this guy do this, he was good at it because he was nominated for some Emmys. Cred edification then plug, “His new special is coming out August 12th.” Adam Carolla does this all the time. Then the last two words of any good intro, the person's name. You never utter their name before the last two words. This is great. In a short period of time. That's a pro doing an introduction. If you here that format, if you pay attention that format, you'll hear all the pros do it. That's what they all do. Adam Carolla will bring somebody on. He's getting a little lazy with his intros, but the first thing he'll do though, he'll be like, “I want you to come down and grab a seat right there. Bob's new special is out on Netflix.” The first thing he does is plug them. I always ask guests before we start, “What do you plug in? What's the thing you're plugging right now?” Because it could be different than what they're known for.
I might be doing a YouTube thing or whatever. Right now, I'm doing Automation is Awesome. That is the thing I'm digging into. You ask them that and then you’re plugging that as you're doing the show and they don't have to do it anymore. They don't have to feel so obligated like shit because we know based on statistics that 85% of people don't make it to the end of a podcast. They clock out. They don't make the last fifteen minutes. When you hear those people do the double banger, “Can you tell everybody how to find you?” It's like, “It's your job, shithead.” At the very end of the show where people aren't listening anyway, you're getting 15% audience rate at that point. They literally wasted their time. They were hoping to connect with your audience and get them to see their stuff and follow them and be part of their universe.
Dustin
I want to flip the script here. What if you’re on as a guest like on this show that I have poorly seeded? What do you do because now you're stuck?
Michael
I tell them.
Dustin
You just tell them? It's like it lends itself to them.
Michael
If it's a bad intro, I’ll tell them right out of the gates sometimes. Here's a perfect example of this. I was speaking at an event in Maine and I have a friend who's very talented at what she does. She’s new on the speaking circuit. She's had a couple of gigs. She's still working on the craft. She's new and I view her as that. There's a number of things I would work on if I were her. She had a pretty good speaking gig and it's the one for bots, ManyChat. It was a conference not too long ago. There was somebody emceeing that, I don't know if it was the same emcee for the whole thing or not, was not trained. He did not know how to do it. He was not an emcee. He was probably a guy that was in marketing or whatever. Somebody said, “You're handsome, go do this.” She asked me, “Would you watch my segment and let me know how he did?” I said, “Sure.” Literally within two minutes, I said, “He threw you under the bus.” He destroyed her presentation with the worst intro I’ve seen since I did a gig in Australia and got that same shitty intro. The guy was like, “Our next speaker is Carrie and she does this. The speaker after that is going to be, and after that is going to be.” She's in the wings ready to go. “After that it's going to be, come on out, Carrie.” There’s no energy, no edification.
Dustin
Which is why you need to speak it real for that, because that happens all the time. Are you a fan of that?
Michael
No, I don't like those. Not if there's an actual emcee.
Dustin
Why not have the emcee who has the authority, credibility with the audience if they're good, maybe you're later in the lineup. They built rapport and introduce a video because that emcee doesn’t know you.
Michael
It's an energy killer. It's a super awkward. It happened to me at Thrive a couple times. I even talked to a guy that always starts with it because what happens is because that guy was so shitty for ManyChat, they can't rely on an emcee. What should happen is they should have a conversation beforehand and say, “Is there an experienced emcee? If not, here's my video.” I would do a better job and I would edify better and they're walking in 30 minutes before they go on. They don't know the room, they don't know the audience. It’s the same deal. They’re two-minute long and it might not play well at all in that room. I’ve seen it not play well. I’ve seen people ten seconds in and I got a face full of lit phones because people aren't giving a shit about this guy's thing.
Whereas I would have been able to read the room better and been like, “You guys are not going to believe what you're going to learn in the next 25 minutes. This guy is amazing and he's going to blow up.” I know the room. I might even take a couple of shares and be like, “What do you know about chatbots? You know anything about chatbots?” If I'm at some general conferences, not all know chatbots and I'd be like, "Who knows anything about chat bots?” I’d say, “If you don't know anything about chatbots, our next speaker is going to teach you everything you need to know to get your chatbot up and running and how she used it to get great email conversions, how she uses it to grow her brand online and absolutely cater and nurture all new customers. Does that sound pretty exciting to you? Ladies and gentlemen.” Everyone's psyched. She comes out with energy. It completely shifts not only the room but the speaker and how they come out of the gates and deliver because of this poor girl who didn't even know how to handle this.
I'm not even kidding you when I watched this thing and I said, “Holy shit.” I don't know that I wouldn't have talked the organizer and I would have said, “I want somebody to introduce me. That wasn't an introduction.” Seriously, I would've like not come out. I would not come out and be like, “Can someone know how to do this?” I’d have been so pissed about it. I'm going to reach out to them and be like, “You need an emcee next year because that was terrible.” That to me is how it shifts. If it's a general thing, the problem is we get so excited about how cool we think we are, that those reels are too long and they drag on and then they oftentimes reference a lot of things that nobody in that room gives a shit about. “He was the number one real estate,” and you're at a cooking convention. Who cares? You're speaking there about something else. You can't make a new reel every time.
Dustin
I want to say this. I have done a terrible job seeding your automation and so let's take this opportunity. What do you have to say about automation? What are you working on?
Michael
Automation is good. I nerd it out with Siri shortcuts and Zapier. Now I'm at a point where it had I decided to hire one. I could probably fire my VA at this point.
Dustin
You're talking to your phone telling it to do stuff.
Michael
All kinds of stuff, show notes on making podcast. I have one. We're doing the show. Let's say that you want it to have some cool show notes. Let's say we did this on Zoom or whatever and I left. I walk out the door and then you'd pop open your shortcuts app. I have all these shortcuts. I’ve got dozens of them and I have one called Show Notes. It's given me like a dictate text thing and it's dictating as we speak right now. I hit stop on it and then here's the bulk of the show, here's what we talked about and here is how amazing this show is going to be. I hit stop. The next thing it's going to happen, it's going to ask me for the links. I can say, "You have to go to GetWealthFit.com.” This is my live ad read for this particular episode, “I hope you buy all of my stuff.” That's all done. If I go to my Solopreneur Hour WordPress, all I had to do is go to posts in my WordPress.
Whenever the show's out, like it could happen who knows when, if I look at all posts, you can see the top post, so it's given me a dictate. It's got title caps on it instead of how I read it. What I would typically do is say, “794 colon, in a fantastic studio right now.” It's fully in a template. It's got the bulk of the show, any relevant links and featured ads on this episode. The whole infrastructure is there. That I could do walking down the street and literally fifteen seconds, and this is part A. I’ll jump on and I’ll grab a picture that I didn't Photoshop that's like whatever. That's the show picture. I upload it and hit submit. The second I hit submit, all hell breaks loose. Using my RSS feed, so no other trigger, Zapier looks at my RSS feed.
When this RSS feed changes, I want to take this certain set of data and put it in multiple different places. I’ve got custom posts for LinkedIn, Facebook page, two Facebook groups, Twitter all happen on the fly and they're all custom. They are formatted for that medium. That's all there. I turned this off. If I wanted to, I could have it automatically fire a guest email. It says, “Thanks so much for being on the show. Here's the picture, here's the show links, here's the show notes, ready to be shared on all your stuff.” It’s all automated so I don't have to touch it. All I have to do is hit publish on that WordPress post that I dictated and all of my social media is done with the exception of Instagram.
Dustin
You're the killer of jobs. I love it. What are you doing with this? Are you selling this? Are you packaging your shortcuts? Is this pre-release?
Michael
It's pre-release. I have a bunch of higher ticket things, but I want a little tripwire deal. I'm going to do a chunk of automations for $29. They can go to AutomationIsAwesome.com and get a free one. The free one is the Trello one.
Dustin
Let me finally act on some of your advice. We met at a podcasting conference and you showed me this thing that blew my world. You meet so many people at these conferences and you just need a name, phone number and email or whatever, just a few bits of information. You were following up automated when usually you have to go back to your hotel room or airplane and follow up with fifteen people.
Michael
“Siri, connect us.” It's changed a little bit. “We talked about awesome automation.” I’ve never done this. I’ll take a picture. I just installed iOS 13. What would typically have happened is I would have gotten a little message box. It would have said, “What's the email address?” Then it would say, “Who's the rock star you're talking to?” I would have to type it or say it in. It would say, “What do we talk about?” Siri is fully integrated where you're having a conversation, which is cool. What happens is I’ve done all that and there's a populated email. What's cool when you talk to somebody at a conference and you only know a little tidbit of them. Let's say you only talk a little bit about your own skillset. In my case, if I'm at NAMM, which is the National Association of Music and Merchants, I have a couple of different angles on that. One is for beginner audio file, which is one of my podcasts. The other is for The Solopreneur Hour.
If I want to review items that are sponsors for the show, they might not know one side or the other. I'm a drummer and I want a little endorsement from Sabian Cymbals or something. That follow-up email touches on all of those things, “If we talked about this, here's my Solopreneur Hour. If we talked about gear reviews, here's beginner audio file info. If we talked about music, here's my YouTube channel that has all my drumming videos on it.” This person who didn't know me at all, all of a sudden it has this cool little CV on me that we can connect, “If we need to talk about sponsorship things, click my booking link,” and then people can click right through. I never had to do anything. I never had to lift a finger for that. The one I have on YouTube though, if you guys go to the YouTube channel, which is Solopreneur Hour on YouTube, is my Siri one. If you guys are entrepreneurs and you have ideas all the time, which we all do.
I have a hard time just getting the stuff out of my brain and onto something. That's always a huge challenge for me. If I'm walking to the coffee shop and I think of something, it's as easy for me to forget it by the time I’ve ordered my chai. It's gone. I’ll think of it in two years. I'm like, “I thought about that one.” I wanted to make something that was a brain dump. I'm walking. I just go, “Siri, new task. Make sure you follow up with Tom Cruise for his new podcast.” I said that. That's done. I'm assuming it will be done. What happens now magically is that I use Trello for my project management. This thing automatically fires over to Trello. I have a board called the ultimate to-do list.
One of the first things I do in the morning is I check it. I check and see what I’ve got and like what's going on. If you look at my to-do list in the top item. I can do that. It's so funny because it says, "Make sure you follow up with Tom cruise and then make sure you show Alison cool automation, show Katherine cool automation, show Elizabeth.” Everyone's like, “How do you do this?” That's me demonstrating this. You wake up in the morning and then this particular board has notes and new ideas, which is a brain dump. Then projects, tasks, future tasks, waiting for input, complete, waiting on delivery and follow-up. I wake up and I can just move those things to those categories and then I know what I have to do. It’s a quick brain dump. There's a video of how to set that up on YouTube.
Dustin
Michael
I'm going to give away one for Automation is Awesome. I don't know which one I'm going to give away yet. It might be this one because when you learn the dictation part, it was a matter of what destination do you want this thing to go to? The destination could be Trello, which is what I use. It could be notes like Apple Notes, it could be reminders, it can be anything that you like. It could be Google Sheets. It's a little bit of idea how to do it. It's not super complicated but you need a little tool. That's what Automation is Awesome is going to do a little bit of teaching around that.
Dustin
Michael, it has been a treat. I could go for many an hour with you. You make this so easy and fun. I love it. My guest can be found @SoloHour. He tried Solopreneur, but because so many people can't spell solopreneur or entrepreneur, it's just @SoloHour on all the social channels.
Michael
You can still go to SolopreneurHour.com.
Dustin
I'm not going to ask you if there's anywhere else because I should know that. How does this work? What if I missed something that’s important? Will you jump in? Am I supposed to have all seventeen of your calls to action at the end? What do you recommend there? I should have asked.
Michael
That's the thing. Before we hit record, what I typically like to do is I’ll have that stuff written down. I’ve done a little bit. It's not like you didn't do research. You have all these cool questions and all like that. I’ll say, “Take me through your properties. You're doing this,” anything you want me to promote in particular. In my case, I'm keeping them all going right now. I’ve got new videos on Solopreneur Hour, on Rennch, on beginner audio file. I have new podcasts on Solopreneur. Those are my four properties. Automation is Awesome is number five. If you like vintage sports cars and you like watching people weld and fabricate and do cool stuff on them, I have a build that I started. I'm three videos and that's going to be probably two years’ worth of videos. In the Porsche world, if you've ever heard of a Carera RS, you hear that word RS a lot. RS stands for Renn Sport. The word Renn, which means race in German is what would be the Carera race sport in Germany. That word Renn is ubiquitous in the Porsche community. We have Renn Line and the Renn Sport Reunion and Renn Fest and all the Rens are there.
I was at the rabbit hole in Normal Heights here in San Diego. I'm sitting down and I was thinking it'd be cool to do a YouTube channel for all the Porsche DIY stuff because I’ve already built one in a forum. I want to do another one on YouTube. I'm going to make a brand around the DIY Porsche vintage thing for people that are building air-cooled 911s and things like that. The word Rennch is what came to me, which is great. The logo is the Porsche crest solid with a wrench cutout of it. It's a great logo. I use the font that Porsche used all through their history. It’s Helvetica, it's not their font. That's the brand and it is right there. It's cool. It looks the part. The tag is DIY tips and tricks for Porsche geeks.
Dustin
I appreciate you being on the show and just being a guided model and sharing your wisdom and being you and having fun because you are a true inspiration.

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Opportunership, Ideating & Bacon Wrapped Businesses

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Intrapreneurship, Excellence & Innovation

Tap into the wisdom of multi-billion dollar companies and recent research in the fields of excellence & innovation, with José Pires.

Intrapreneurship, Excellence & Innovation

Personal Branding

Personal Branding

How To Create a Brand That Opens Big Doors, Attracts True Fans, and Makes Selling Easy

Michelle Villalobos

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Product Branding

Product Branding

How To Create a Product Everyone Knows, Likes, Trusts … and Buys From

Rick Cesari

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Credit Secrets for Entrepreneurs

Credit Secrets for Entrepreneurs

How To Use Business & Personal Credit To Launch Your Startup

Gerri Detweiler

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Feeling Invincible, Marketing Martha Stewart & Dropping 76 Pounds!

Once Sayan Sarkar finally quit his full-time job, his side hustle business took off and generated 10x the amount of money he was making at his office job. He shares tips and tricks to how he was able to make this happen.

Feeling Invincible, Marketing Martha Stewart & Dropping 76 Pounds!

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Born To Sell, Tripling Revenue & the Silver Tsunami

Are you investing in home care marketing? In this episode, The Hurricane explains why this industry is worth your hard-earned money.

Born To Sell, Tripling Revenue & the Silver Tsunami

Joint Venture Marketing

Joint Venture Marketing

How To Boost Your Sales Through Strategic, Low-Cost Marketing Partnerships

Ridgely Goldsborough

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Conquering Cancer, Making Movies & Selling Businesses

This Cancerpreneur didn’t let the bad news of illness get in the way of his entrepreneurial spirit and positive mindset.

Conquering Cancer, Making Movies & Selling Businesses

Free PR

Free PR

The Hustler's Guide To Capturing Media Attention & Getting Eyeballs on Your Brand

Nicole Dunn

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Persuasive Copywriting

Persuasive Copywriting

How To Write Words That Capture Attention, Create Desire, & Sell Your Product Like Crazy

Mara Glazer

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How To Build Your Business Credit Score — To Get Loans & Low Interest Rates

Learn how to build your business credit score so you can get access to business loans and credit cards with low interest rates.

How To Build Your Business Credit Score — To Get Loans & Low Interest Rates

Michelle Black

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article
Do You Have What It Takes To Be An Entrepreneur?

In her new book “Women with Money,” Jean Chatzky gives us the top 5 traits of successful entrepreneurs. [Excerpt]

Do You Have What It Takes To Be An Entrepreneur?

Jean Chatzky

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Idea To Income

Idea To Income

How To Start a Company and Turn Your Entrepreneurial Dreams into Reality

Didi Wong

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article
How to Fund Your Business with Government Grants

Who doesn't want cash from their favorite Uncle Sam? Here's how you can find grants and fund your business with free government money.

How to Fund Your Business with Government Grants

Ian Chandler

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How Much Do You REALLY Need to Start a Business? The Answer is Less Than You Think.

Think starting a business takes TONS of money? It doesn’t have to. Here’s how you can build your empire without breaking the bank.

How Much Do You REALLY Need to Start a Business? The Answer is Less Than You Think.

Jon Westenberg

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Bootstrap Your Startup & Kickstart Your Success

Launching a startup without investors may seem like a one-way ticket to failure—but it’s one of the best ways to kickstart your business.

Bootstrap Your Startup & Kickstart Your Success

Ian Chandler

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Learn 5 Key Ways to Onboard Employees

Your employees are your most valuable asset. Protect your investment in them with an effective and efficient onboarding process.

Learn 5 Key Ways to Onboard Employees

Nathan Wade

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How to Lead Employees to Greatness: Your (Hormonal) Strategy for Success

Consider and stimulate (the right) hormones for your team. Embrace leadership tactics that foster healthy hormonal teams.

How to Lead Employees to Greatness: Your (Hormonal) Strategy for Success

Jill Huettich

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