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Reichen Kuhl: Creating Your Life Résumé

We are talking to the $1-million-winner of The Amazing Race. He's also the CEO of LeaseLock. His name is Reichen Kuhl and he is a true Renaissance Man. You're going to be fascinated by this episode no matter what interests that you have. This is somebody who is fascinating and sets the bar for creating what Jesse Itzler came to coin as the life résumé.

Looking back over your life, do you want to accomplish and be well-versed in a lot of different areas or stay in a career for 30 or 40 years? There's no right or wrong answer, but it's something that is rather fascinating. You're going to love this episode for it.

We talked about the million-dollar prize. We talked about The Amazing Race. We also talked about being an actor on Frasier and The Drew Carey Show, a TV host and a whole bunch more. For those of you who are like, “Where's the meat?” We get into building LeaseLock raised over $11.5 million. He started this while he was going to law school. There’s a little something for everyone in this episode. I can't wait for you to read it.

Dustin
Reichen, your life résumé is insane. For those of you who don't know Reichen, he is a former USAFA graduate. My dad was one of those, so I got much respect for you there. He’s The Amazing Race winner, author, physics teacher, lawyer, flight instructor, a former model and actor appearing on commonly known shows such as Frasier, The Drew Carey Show. You're a TV show host, a jewelry maker, an entrepreneur, and founder. Is there a career or activity that is still on your bucket list to do?
Reichen
Yes, there is. I would like to open up a little law firm that focuses on animal rights and animal welfare. After that, I'll probably retire as a ski instructor in some mountain up in Colorado and then I'll be done with all my work.
Dustin
Those are very achievable and attainable. You're in the military. Did you know you would be a Renaissance Man? Did you know growing up that you had a lot of different interests in things that you would pursue or do these things happened organically?
Reichen
They definitely happened more organically. When I was at the Air Force Academy, I was clueless. I grew up in a trailer park in the poor side of the town in richer area in Massachusetts. I was wide-eyed at how beautiful everything was in Colorado. I was happy to be out of the trailer park and starting a new life in the military. The Air Force Academy made an adult out of me. It made a man out of me. They strip you down with everything that you've known, had, or wanted and let you build yourself back up to the person you're going to be and try to get through the program. I was focusing on that goal and trying to graduate the academy at that time. One thing led to another after that.
Dustin
Looking back over your career, you could be done right now. Most people would envy all the different things that you've done. What has been the most surprising to you over your life thus far?
Reichen
Probably the most surprising is when I ended up an actor and I’m on Frasier. I’m in front of a live studio audience and working with some of the best people in comedy. That's the moment where I was like, “How did I get here?” That was probably the most surprising. All of these things that I've done have had their half-life, shelf-life, full-life and then they ended. That's okay because when the opportunities end, it leaves the door open for you to do something else or try something else. As exciting as all of those things have been, they do come to an end.
Dustin
It's very easy for someone on the outside looking in to say, “This guy gets bored easily.” Do you see it that way?
Reichen
I get bored when there is no more movement on it. When it doesn't seem to be going anywhere and it doesn’t seem to be climbing anymore, then I definitely get bored and I think, “Next.” I even sold real estate in my life. I was a real estate agent in LA for a hot minute and I had some success only because I knew celebrities. They used me as an inside job person to sell their houses. I had some good success with that and I probably could have continued but I didn't like it. I didn't like setting up appointments for people to see homes and showing them and then having people not show up and not keeping their word. I did get bored of that, but most of the other things I got bored of because they weren't going anywhere. I can admit that. They were either businesses that were failing or career paths that were not for me because they will not be going to keep going.
Dustin
I want to get into The Amazing Race. That's a big notch in the belt or title. I've seen the show in passing. What was it like being on the show? Did you know it was special? Were you trying to get through it and get to the next challenge? What was it like being a part of that?
Reichen
I didn't know how big the show was when I was on it. I had seen the first three seasons because I watched them in the hotel room as we were about to get shipped off to do the race. The race hadn’t won any Emmys or anything yet. I was trying to get through the end and make sure that I won because I wanted the million dollars but other than that, no. I was just excited to do it because it seemed a cool new experience, but I didn't realize how big it was going to be.
Dustin
How do you feel being on that show and winning it shaped your life? Did business opportunities come out of it? How much of an impact do you think that made on the trajectory of your career?
Reichen
It put me on a dogleg to the right. I say a dogleg because I had to go back onto my course after that. It was a nine-year dogleg. I did the race and it opened up a lot of opportunities for me. The whole reason I ended up getting into acting was that a casting director who loved the show called me into his office at Paramount. He said, “I'm going to put you up with two other actors for this part on Frasier. I'm not going to tell them that you're not an actor. I want to see if you get it because I think you're going to get it.” That doesn't happen unless you're on The Amazing Race and a casting director likes your personality and wants to call you in.
After that I did hosting, I did soap operas, I did podcasts and everything else that I could possibly do. I had the opportunity to create a cologne and a jewelry line. People who produce these types of things don't want to do that unless they think that there's money in it. They're going to see money in it if they see that you've been in the public eye and that you have a following. This was before Instagram, Twitter and all these things were out making people more famous because they were on those types of social media with tons of followers. It was very much online, but it was not so much as social media online. I did this stuff for nine years and then I ended up on a reality show called The A-List in New York City. I moved there for a brief time from LA to do the show and to do a play out there. That was the end of it.
I remember we were getting ready to do the third season of that show and I knew in my heart that I didn't want to do it. I probably did get bored. I wasn't enjoying myself anymore. I had gotten to the point where I felt I wasn't using my brain anymore. I turned into a person who was trying to promote my own name for self-preservation, to make money, and to try to survive. That wasn't a very fun existence. It was empty for me and I wanted to go back and use my brain. That's what prompted me to go to law school because I had always wanted to go to law school and learn everything the lawyers knew. That was where the dogleg ended. I feel like I'm back on the brain tracking in. I’m an Air Force Academy graduate. Most of them are not stupid and use their brains a lot in their lives. I felt like I went back on that path after my time was up pretty much in Hollywood and in entertainment.
Dustin
I'm a sucker for a law degree. I too have been in business. It always felt like when you have your slip-ups or you do something where people want to let you know that you screwed up, they send you a cease and desist and they send you these nasty scary letters. I've always felt like, “If I had that, I'd be more empowered.” You said that when you were on the show, you were empty inside and you needed that brain stimulation. Was there anything else there for you to go and pursue that law degree? How did you arrive at the school that you chose and picked the specialty?
Reichen
It happened fast. I'm definitely an extremist when it comes to making decisions where I feel like this is not where I'm supposed to be. I need to do something else. I remember the date was May 12th and I was sitting in a boardroom at Viacom and we were talking about season three. I remember the conversations going on in the room about how this was going to be our biggest year. We were going to get paid the most. It was going to launch us further in our career. I remember looking at the ceiling and thinking, “I can't do this anymore. I'm not happy.” I went back to my apartment in New York and I called my agent and I told her that I wasn't going to do season three. She told me I was crazy. This was in one day.
I told her, “I know what I want to do. I want to go back to school. I want to use my brain.” She said, “What do you mean go back to school?” I said, “I want to go to law school.” She said, “You're not going to go to law school. What do you think, you're going to graduate law school and become a lawyer?” I said, “I will. I'd like to at least go there and try.” She said, “You're crazy. You're having a bad day. Call me tomorrow.” After I got off the phone with her, I called the moving company to get my stuff moved back to LA. I didn't have a place yet. I called an LSAT course being held at UCLA and I asked them if I could enroll. It was $1,000 and I paid for it right there with a credit card.
I was like, “If I take the first step, I will end up in law school.” I didn't know where I was going to go. I missed LA. I didn't like living in New York after about six months. The fun was over because you can't walk out the door without spending $500. I went back to LA. A friend of mine who had an empty apartment because he was traveling, let me use the apartment. I started taking the LSAT course and then because I was around those people, they were all talking about their applications to schools. I started getting in that group and applying to schools. I got into quite a few schools around the country, but Loyola Law School offered me a night program in LA. I thought that would be cool and I could maybe pursue other things. At that time, I had the idea for LeaseLock because when I first moved to New York, I had been denied an apartment because I didn't make 80 times the monthly rent the year before when you have to prove that on your tax return. I haven't made almost $400,000 a year the year before. I happened to not make $400,000 a year on my tax return the year before. They wouldn't let me live there.
I got a chip on my shoulder about it. I had created a little website called LeaseLock to try it. I said, “I'm a complete stranger. I will co-sign on your lease for you if you pay me 10% of the full lease value upfront. Let me see that you're employed like your pay stubs and let me see your bank accounts, so I can see you actually have some money.” I’ve got 250 applications in a week and a half from people who wanted me to co-sign on their lease. I didn't advertise or anything. I used keyword search terms and I picked about twelve people. I collected about $40,000 in three days and I put the money aside and I had co-signed in twelve leases. You can imagine it was a risk because if they have all defaulted, I would have been completely screwed. There's nothing in the credit system that keeps track of how many leases you co-sign on, which I took advantage of. I waited a year, and nobody defaulted. I got to keep the $40,000 because I had picked good risks. When I moved out to LA to go to law school, I also had an idea of taking my business idea to an incubator and I did.
It all fell into place. I was paying attention and watching all my options and seeing what I could do. Night school was working for me because I was like, “I'm going to try to pursue this LeaseLock idea during the day.” I built the LeaseLock while I was in law school at night. I would do LeaseLock on the day and law school at night. I would read on the weekends all my law readings. I had no weekends for four years because the night program took four years. Thank God I was in law school because many things happen to LeaseLock where I would take those problems and issues to my professors. It was free legal help for four years while I built LeaseLock. They would literally help me with everything I was doing from corporate formation to insurance law. The list goes on and on and I was able to build LeaseLock because I was closely knit with lawyers.
Dustin
That's the first revelation for me and I'm not claiming that I know a lot. The idea of starting your company and pursuing a law degree is fascinating because you've got all the resources right there in terms of the legal aspect. That could be an interesting strategy for folks to do the same thing. You said that you're an extremist. Are you just so driven that you were like, “I'm going to do both?” Was there any other secret sauce where at some point you're like, “Maybe I should give up this law school thing and do LeaseLock or maybe I should slow down and finish this thing quicker?” How did you balance the two mentally?
Reichen
With total hunger. It wasn't like I’m this crazy who wants to kill myself for four years in trying to do all these things. I felt I was at the end of the road that I had spent nine years in entertainment and then it ended up at a dead end. My heart wasn't in it anymore. I knew if my heart wasn't in it, money wasn't going to come anymore. I was down to almost nothing besides the money I made at LeaseLock in doing my idea. I sold my house before I moved to New York. I sold my house in LA. I was living off that money and I had nothing left and nowhere to go. I had to do it all the way. I knew I had to or I was going to end up with nothing. I was motivated by the thought of being successful and wealthy again and I did more than that. I went to law school at night from 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM four days a week. I worked on LeaseLock during the day and then I got a job with a law firm in LA, the top personal injury law firm. They liked that I was a pilot and they let me be the Head Clerk of their Aviation Accident Division. I learned a ton. I did that about ten hours a week.
I was organizing their files and helping the lawyers with their memos when they were writing memos to judges about aviation accidents. They would ask me to make sure they were aviation wise accurate like, “Are we writing about this the correct way? Does the pilot have to do this at this particular time in the flight and did the pilot not do it?” I would help them with all that. I've surrounded myself with lawyers. I made money by working in the law firm. I started making money with LeaseLock only because I had other investors who believed in my idea and started investing in me and in the company. I was able to start living off of the LeaseLock investment and paying myself a very modest salary along with the law firm. At the same time, I was paying for law school too. It was a struggle but I was hungry and I believed that it would all pan out if I worked hard and I was right.
Dustin
I'm convinced you are a Superman. You have somehow figured out a way to put 27 or 30 hours in your day with all the stuff that you have accomplished and what you shared with us there. It's incredibly fascinating and motivating. How do you see it?
Reichen
When I look back at it, it makes me tired. LeaseLock is going well. I have 30 employees now. We are operating nationwide. We've been partially bought by Liberty Mutual Insurance Company and by American Family Insurance Company. Things are going well. I’m at this point where I'm super happy with the way the business is going. I'm having fun every single day, not just running the business and learning much from my employees who know much more than I do in all their specific areas but learning from my investors of how to make this better and bigger. It's a nice position to be in. I don't think I could do it again. I don't know if I could put in the effort that I did during those years. It was five or six years where every single day was super hard.
I'm thankful but anything worth moving toward, we got to work hard at it and you’ve got to dedicate 24 hours a day to it or it might not happen. There are many people who think it's about getting rich quick. If you do get rich quick, I don't believe that it's good for you because you didn't work hard enough to appreciate what you got from it. You're going to spend it all fast like The Amazing Race money that I got. I spent it fast. I probably made people's heads spin because I didn't appreciate the money. With this and what I have now and what I have in my hand, I appreciate all the hard work that went into it and all of the dedication that I put into getting here. It means more and there's something to be said for that.
Dustin
I want to go back to LeaseLock. You co-signed on the twelve leases. How did you get from there to now LeaseLock’s business model? Will you explain the business model or the benefit? We have a lot of real estate investors that read this episode. This is something they can bring to what they’re doing. Will you walk us through that?
Reichen
I started LeaseLock because I had a chip on my shoulder. I wanted to help people get into apartments that they normally wouldn't get into if they were good risks and deserve to be in those apartments like I deserved it. I had to get a co-signer to get in my unit and I didn't want anyone else to have to do that. I started LeaseLock to help people find a home. When I finally sat down with some insurance lawyers, they said, “This is great. You're being a financial guarantor for people, but if it gets too big, you're going to be accused of practicing insurance without a license because this is insurance. It's not a financial guarantee, it’s insurance because you're setting premium amounts based on risk.” I was doing 10% of lease value. Then they said, “You're paying claims out when a default happens. When the DOI figures out what you're doing, they're going to come in and say, ‘This is insurance and you’re not an insurance person.’” The incubator that I went to put me in touch with a guy named Derek Merrill who had sold his mobile advertising company to AT&T out of Berkeley.
He was super young and super smart. He knew more about investments and the venture capital world. I knew nothing. I knew I had a good idea that was making money and other investors are recognizing that. They introduced me to him and we sat down together, and I realized right away he was a product guy. He likes selling products, but he likes selling products that didn't have inventory. My product has no inventory. We were selling paper and financial guarantee. I knew right away that we were going to be a great match and I knew that he could operate this company. He could be my COO and I could watch over everything else. I knew right away also that he had no interest in legal paperwork, details, compliance or any of that. I had a huge interest in that stuff. We were a good team from the get-go because I was always going to be on the legal, intricate, compliance, finance. I wanted to do all that and he wanted to operate. He wanted to go and sell the product and make a product that was super sellable.
He was the one who realized that this was a product not only for renters, but it was for property management. He was the one who identified that property management companies in the leasing world hate security deposits. They hate collecting them. They hate managing them. They hate having to give them back. They hate the litigation that goes around giving back security deposits when renters aren't happy. They hate the bad reviews online and answer people because they didn't get their deposit back that they thought they were going to get it. LeaseLock became an alternative to security deposits. In the beginning, I used to look at renter applications. Renters would fill out an application that I would decide, or my underwriters would decide if they were worthy of a LeaseLock. Derek was the one who said, “Let's go application less and let's sell this to property management companies as a whole and say, ‘Here's your chance to stop using security deposits and replace security deposits with insurance. You'll make every renter pay $19 a month. If the renter doesn't pay their rent or causes damage, LeaseLock will cover you.’”
That's the direction we went in. I loved it. We stopped applications and we started selling this to huge property management companies. We are now with Greystar, the largest property management company in the country. They have 400,000 units. Overall, LeaseLock is now in 1.3 million units across the country, because property management companies are requiring LeaseLock and scrapping the use of security deposits across the board. We have gone from a company that was trying to help renters find a home, which we still do, to a company that is fundamentally changing the way leasing real estate transactions are done. We're taking the country by storm right now in all of multifamily and property management because the smart property managers are realizing that security deposits are a poor form of self-insurance. That’s something that's been done for 200 years and it doesn't work. Nobody likes them.
Renters don't like reaching in their pocket at the beginning of the lease to put down security deposits. They'd rather pay $19 a month and they get to move in. The renter is happy and then the property management is happy because they don't have to manage security deposits and be more worried. An automatic pure claims-based system was integrated into all of their systems now. They are systems that figure out who hasn't and has paid rent on time. LeaseLock is alerted automatically within our systems if someone hasn't paid their rent. The system gets ready to pay that claim. We're making this touchless by humans. We're getting more and more integrated every single day and we keep going.
Dustin
You've raised $11.5 million and maybe it's more, but that's what I came across. For folks who are entrepreneurs who want to go this route of raising money, what would be your advice or tips for them? The pluses and the minuses.
Reichen
Start small. I started this off by raising a little money from friends and then I went to the incubator. My first investment from the incubator was only $21,000. It was something to live on and it was something that Derek and I could use a little bit to live on for a little while which is okay. People think that you raise money from a company and you have to tell the company that you're going to use every cent for printers, desks and phones. That's not true. An investor is investing in you. It's okay to raise money and use it to pay yourself a salary while you're building the company.
If you'd want to do that, you have to make sure that you sell yourself properly to the investor. Let them know what your qualities are, let them know what your background is, let them know what your traction is. If you have no traction, try to get at least a little. I had my $40,000 that I made because nobody defaulted when I took that risk. You want to have some proof of concept. You don't have to have made $40,000 but have some proof of concept to show that you have a working app or a working website. Get a letter of intent from one company that maybe saying, “If this were built, they will use you,” anything like that. That's part of selling yourself. It's showing that you have the motivation to try something, to take a risk, to put the effort. That's necessary to make something that actually works and that can be invested in and start small. Use that money to prove the concept again a little bit more and then you're going to get more. Then you're like me, in March I closed a $10 million Series A round led by some of the biggest VCs in the country and the biggest insurance companies all putting their money in. That's how it works. It doesn't happen all at once, but you got to start small.
Dustin
What surprised you in building LeaseLock? What's something that maybe you didn't know before, but now you look back and it's like, “That was surprising?”
Reichen
I didn't know anything about insurance or multifamily leasing before I did this. Now I feel like I'm an expert in both, at least in property casualty insurance and in multifamily leasing. It took two guys like me and Derek who had no experience in either insurance or multifamily to look inside both worlds and say, “The way that you have been doing this is completely wrong.” We looked at insurance and saw how antiquated the whole industry is. Now everything is about insuretech and making things automated and easy for the consumer. We're riding that insuretech wave input in multifamily. We looked in and said, “Security deposits are stupid. Collecting them and using them is a bad way to do business.” When you present that to people within multifamily, it's amazing how they will agree with us and say, “You're right, we do hate them and this is a better way to do this. We're going to use LeaseLock.” What was surprising is how many things are needed to be changed that I wasn't even aware of. I learned so much by immersing myself in both worlds.
Dustin
What do you see as the future for LeaseLock and maybe in the industry in whole too?
Reichen
I think LeaseLock is here to stay. We have coined the new term lease insurance. Lease insurance did not exist before LeaseLock and lease insurance is the way of the future for multifamily leasing transactions. In 2017, there were $40 billion of security deposit collected and sitting in escrow accounts. These are accounts that can even be used by property management that they have to sit there and be held in these trust accounts. We want to take that $40 billion of dead money every year and turn it into insurance premium that's working for people and doing the right thing and being applied where it should be applied. I see LeaseLock being bought in the future by probably a very large insurance company or a very large multifamily leasing company. I don't think I could do this longer than another ten years or something. Ten years is a long time and I'm sure there's going to be some big movement with LeaseLock before that time but LeaseLock is here to stay.
Dustin
I want to move us into WealthFit round, which essentially is rapid fire questions. I wanted to come up with a cool name for it. You've done a lot of different things. You've placed investments and you've invested in yourself in many different careers. Over the years in your whole lifetime, what's been your most worthwhile investment?
Reichen
It’s definitely the law school. If you're going to build a business and if you have a law degree, you have such a leg up over many different people. Law school costs about $300,000, but it was the best thing I could have ever done and it has helped me much. It’s education.
Dustin
What's that investment that you don't want to talk about?
Reichen
I have fun putting out cologne but I invested a lot of money to produce that cologne. Once I start something I don't stop. I tried to take it all the way. I ended up getting a cologne sold in a retail store and I was doing a jewelry line along with it. I got that into Saks, but I was a different person back then. I wasn't using my brain back then. I was trying to promote the name Reichen. That's all I cared about because that's the only way at the time I can continue to survive and try to become more successful. I realized this is not what I want for me and this is not me. Those are the things I wouldn't want to talk about anymore.
Dustin
When life is humming and you want to treat yourself and you're making good money, what's that guilty spending splurge that Reichen likes?
Reichen
I love to buy old Mercedes or BMW or old German cars, and I like to fix them up and put them in showroom condition. Lately, I've been more stuck in the ‘90s buying these old ‘90s Mercedes. I like to work on them on the weekends inside out from engine to interior. I have a couple of mechanics who I can go to if I hit a dead end. I hit dead ends a lot and then they save me and help me get through it. I like to sell the cars for a profit. That's a side hobby of mine. I have one that I finished and I don't think I'll ever sell it, I’m really attached.
Dustin
What is that dream one on your bucket list like, “I want to buy it and restore it?” Is there one that you have in mind?
Reichen
It was the one that I have now. It's a ‘95 E320 Convertible and I got it for nothing. It was in a bad shape and now it's probably worth $25,000. That's what the mechanic said he could get for it. It's gorgeous and beautiful and I don't think I'll ever get rid of it.
Dustin
You've done much and you've accomplished many different things. Do you have any special routines, rituals or things that you do to get yourself in state or to be productive?
Reichen
I get up at 5:00 AM and I immediately go walk my dogs, bring them in and feed them. I go straight to the gym, come back, and then I get ready for work. I like to do all that stuff super early in the morning. Being up before everybody else gives me a sense of being ahead of the next guy. It makes me feel like I'm winning. If I sleep in, I don't feel like that. I get super depressed. I have to be up early and then I try to go to bed early too, but that doesn't always work out, especially if I have a TV show that I'm addicted to. I'm addicted to the TV show, Forsyte, and I keep staying up late watching it. That's my ritual every day. I'm usually the first one at LeaseLock before anyone else. Some days a couple of my lawyers beat me in.
Dustin
Thanks so much for sharing your wisdom, sharing your story, sharing LeaseLock with us. For folks who are fascinated by you and want to keep tabs with what you are up to in the world and most certainly, for those who have rentals or property management and anyone else who could benefit from LeaseLock, where can people do both of those things?
Reichen
You can go online at LeaseLock.com to get an idea of what the program looks like. I'm on Instagram @ReichKuhlesq, you can contact me there. I'm on Facebook also.
Dustin
We truly appreciate you sharing your story and sharing your wisdom. Thanks again. I appreciate you being here now.
Reichen
Thanks a lot. I appreciate you having me.

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Understanding exponential growth is a CRUCIAL part of creating a wealth building mindset. Learn how to use it to your advantage.

Change Your Life (and the World) with an Exponential Mindset

Amy Blacklock

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Get SMART: How to Achieve Your Goals with a Long-Term Mindset

You have goals. Maybe you've had them for years—but they aren't doing you any good collecting dust in a journal. Time to get things done.

Get SMART: How to Achieve Your Goals with a Long-Term Mindset

Jill Huettich

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Financial Success Through Strong Relationships

How to build your business with relationships. Dave Meltzer explains how negotiating relationships is the key to business growth.

Financial Success Through Strong Relationships

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It’s About Time: Learn How to Spend (and Save) Your Time

Time is running out. Don’t you want to make the most of it? Here’s how you can grab the clock by the hands and make the most of your time.

It’s About Time: Learn How to Spend (and Save) Your Time

Kayla Provencher

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Harness the Power of NO: How to Say No, Save Time, and Earn Respect

There’s too much to do. Responsibilities are piling up on your back and you can’t shoulder all of them. It’s time to learn the power of NO.

Harness the Power of NO: How to Say No, Save Time, and Earn Respect

Janine Perri

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Let Clowns Do the Juggling: How Multitasking is Killing Your Productivity

How many things are you doing right now? Put down your phone, close your tabs, and learn how focusing in can save the quality of your work.

Let Clowns Do the Juggling: How Multitasking is Killing Your Productivity

Justin McCormick

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Check Yourself: Keep a Work Checklist & Up Your Productivity

Check it out! You can improve your productivity by keeping a work checklist. Learn how to write one and take your career to the next level.

Check Yourself: Keep a Work Checklist & Up Your Productivity

Jill Huettich

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Developing a Warrior Mindset

Developing a Warrior Mindset

How to Shatter Your Fear, Upgrade Your Brain, & Fight Your Way to Financial Freedom

David Fabricius

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