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Roger Love: Influence, Mirror Culture & The Perfect Voice

My guest is Roger Love, America's number one voice coach. If you're just getting to know Roger, you should know that he has produced more than 150 million CD sales worldwide, written four bestselling books, created the bestselling audio programs, Vocal Power and The Perfect Voice, and has appeared as a regular in four major network TV shows. His film voice coaching credits include Walk the Line, Crazy Heart, Begin Again and Annie.

You are going to be in for a treat. I serve as the human guinea pig later on. In terms of what you're going to walk away with, you are going to understand how to be more influential, how you can control the perceptions of other people and predetermine outcomes for yourself. We're also going to talk about the perfect voice and why your voice is the most powerful communication tool you possess. For many of us, it's trapping us from being more successful. If that sounds intriguing or interesting, you are going to love this.

Dustin
Roger, growing up, you discovered singing makes you happy. At thirteen, you convinced your parents to let you study with the most famous teacher in LA. By sixteen, that teacher asked you to give others a few lessons. Naturally you being you, you said yes. Brian Wilson from the Beach Boys walks through your door as your first lesson. Take us back to that moment. I’ve got to ask you, Roger, were you at all nervous when he walks through that door?
Roger
Of course. I was nervous when he asked me to come and take over the studio. He suddenly decided he was going to go to Banff to teach a master class and he didn't have anyone set up to take over what was the most famous voice studio in the world. He said, “Just come on over after school and teach some lessons.” I said, “How much are you going to pay me for that?” He said, “$100 an hour.” Instantly all of the other questions I had slowly dissipated. I did have one question for him. I said, “I don't know how to teach. I only know how to be a good student.” He said, “For $100 an hour, don't let that stop you.” I didn't. I showed up after school and my first lesson, as you said, was Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys, then Earth, Wind and Fire, then The Jacksons, then hit group after hit group. Chicago. He had Madonna, Stevie Wonder and every major singing star you could possibly imagine was studying with him.
One by one they literally were showing up at my piano. At the beginning, I was very fearful as any sixteen-year-old was. I'm sure I was absolutely sweating from both armpits. The bottom line is, the end result was six months later, when he came back, all of his students, all of his celebrities decided that they wanted to stay with me. We'd found that I had an ability to listen to people create sounds, and then make suggestions how to make it better. I realized during that six months, not only did I have that skill set, but this was an incredible opportunity and an incredible experience. I literally became the second in command of that studio. He brought me in as junior partner at sixteen and a half. I continued to go to school and all the way through college and do everything that I was doing, but I was also in every free waking moment teaching people at that point how to sing.
Dustin
Did you have these dreams of being a singer yourself or focusing on at least on that part of your career? I know you do sing but focusing on that, it seems like you were given this opportunity to teach and you just went all-in on that. What about your singing career?
Roger
The bottom line is I gave up nothing to be a singing coach. That enhanced my singing career. Not only was I there teaching and learning with the greatest singers, artists and writers in the world, but because I started producing the vocals for them, I started singing on all of the records with the artists that I was coaching. I was doing all the backgrounds for Poison if I was doing Poison or any particular group I was doing. I found myself literally in the studio every single day or night. I was singing more than ever.
The thing was, I was studying to be an opera singer at that age. I wasn't thinking rock star. I wasn't thinking I looked as good as Bon Jovi or anyone else that deserves to be a rock star. I didn't think I had hair that was that flowy. I was literally thinking opera. I went to UCLA on a full opera scholarship while I was still teaching full-time. I pursued the study and the performance of opera. I lost my taste for wanting to be an opera singer during college. By that time, I was already singing on all the records I was working on anyways. I was enjoying teaching, focusing on collaborating, still doing a lot of writing and singing on the records of the big stars that I was working on.
Dustin
I had no idea about the opera. I did not find that in my research of your background and I find it fascinating that you pursued something, yet you decided that just wasn't for you. I want to ask you this. When folks were coming to you, like the Beach Boys and all the names that we'll talk about and have mentioned already, the big question I think people would ask is these people are already selling millions of albums. They're already successful. Why are they coming and taking voice lessons? What is their mindset?
Roger
The main reason that anyone seeks out a voice coach should be they're smart enough to realize that maybe there's still stuff to learn. Unfortunately, the number one reason is people still lose their voice, and this goes for speakers and singers. When people lose their voice, they think, “Better go find an expert.” In the beginning, most of my students, the Stevie Wonders, all of the big superstars were coming because they were having problems with their voice. Not because they couldn't sing the song they wanted to, but they were losing their voice. It's surprising, but some of the biggest stars in history didn't have great technique.
For example, when you think of Whitney Houston, you think, “What an amazing voice. She probably went on tour all the time and went from concert to concert,” but she couldn't go on tour because she strained so much. She was a studio singer when you tried to put her out on stage night after night, she made it two nights and then she lost her voice. If the greatest singers and speakers in the world are losing their voices, they go to a voice coach. I became very expert early on at helping to give people back their voices. I had techniques that would take someone who was instantly hoarse and had to give a concert 30 minutes later or a keynote speech 30 minutes later. I would find a way of bringing their voice back to health so that they could do it.
Dustin
What would be an example? I feel like so many people have this happen. They've got an important speech coming up or they've got to give a conference call or something that's riding on it. They either get sick or for some reason their voice isn't there. What is something simple that they can do?
Roger
When people lose their voice, it's usually because they're doing something wrong. They're making a sound that is making the vocal cords red, puffy and swollen. That's what happens when you lose your voice or you get hoarse. The two main reasons that people lose their voice is because they either speak too airy and all that extra air, which they think is so sexy. “I'm going to go into the board meeting today and I'm going to add a little air. They're going to think we'll just give you that zillion-dollar funding because you're so sexy.” They realize maybe they should've kept that air for the bedroom instead of the boardroom because they didn't get funded and then they got fired. Air is a drawing sound. The other sound that makes people get hoarse is this squeaky hinge thing.
A lot of people do that and they don't know they do it. They will be starting a sentence, “I'm excited to be here,” because they feel they're getting paid by the word, they run out of air and they go into that squeaky hinge. If you watch any reality TV, and I feel like I should say I'm sorry if you're spending all of your time watching reality TV, but it's become very prevalent. Turn on the Kardashians and everybody talks like this. You have a whole generation of people learning to talk like this and they're all getting hoarse. That's the sound of the vocal cord slamming into each other without any air. Two things that make people hoarse, squeaky hinge or it's called vocal fry or trying to speak too airy.
Dustin
You've worked with Selena Gomez, Maroon 5, Reese Witherspoon, John Mayer, Gwen Stefani, Tony Robbins, countless other well-known entertainers and leader. You are the number one vocal coach in America. I wanted to start with what does a voice coach do. You talked about that you help people recover their voice, but I know there is a lot more importance to that and you believe that voice is incredibly important. Can you break this down for us?
Roger
I love showing up at places and saying I'm a voice coach and then having people shudder in anticipation or fear thinking, “I didn't sign up to learn how to sing.” I was the keynote speaker for Wharton Business School and there I was looking at out at all of these young people and I said, “I'm a voice coach.” They all looked at each other like, “What? What did we sign up for?” As a voice coach, let me break it down because people don't know what to think. I am someone who helps my students figure out what sounds should be coming out of their mouths so that they influence people. They move people emotionally, so that they can control the perceptions that other people have when they hear you. They can predetermine the outcome of every conversation they have. That's a long list. The truth is, that's what I started doing with singers.
I help singers figure out what sound should come out of their mouths so that they could move people emotionally so that they could get people to buy records. They could get people to come to the concerts, so that they could get people to buy tee shirts. For seventeen years, I taught singers how to create sounds that changed people's emotions because people never remember what you say, but they will remember how you made them feel. Seventeen years later, people like Tony Robbins, Reese Witherspoon, Jeff Bridges, Will Ferrell, Steve Carell, Angelina Jolie and eventually star after star, all the way up until Bradley Cooper, who I just worked with on the film, A Star is Born, started coming to me and they said, “We want you to work with our speaking voices.” I said, “No, thank you.” They said, “We want to work with you on your speaking voice.” I said, “Thank you, but no thank you. I'm a singing coach and I like your movies and your TV shows, but no, thank you. Didn't I mention that?”
They kept asking, so eventually I thought, “These people are opening up their mouths and they already have influence over millions of people. Maybe there's something special I can do with their speaking voices.” That started what has been the last fifteen years of my life focusing not only on just singing but speaking. It has honestly changed my life because when you teach someone how to sing, they sell more records. They sell more downloads and they sell more concert tickets. When you help someone find their voice, it completely changes them. None of this is woo-woo. It changes the way they feel about themselves, the way they hear themselves. It changes the way everyone else perceives them.
It changes every communication they have because now they can move people emotionally and now they're successful in business and in personal relationships all because they realized that the words don't matter as much as you think they do. Let me expand on that just for a second. Since the ‘60s, scientific studies have been trying to prove what percentage of the words you use. The sounds you make and what your body does factors into whether or not anyone believes you, likes you, wants to listen to you, trusts you, and gives on what you're going to say. In the ‘60s, the beginning studies said when you speak to someone, what makes you believable is 55% what you're doing with your body, your hand gestures and your body movements. 7% the words you use and 38% tonality, the sounds you make aside from the words.
Every self-help expert in history since 1960-something started touting those statistics saying, “It's not the words you use, it's your body language. It's not the words you use, it's the sounds you make.” Year-after-year, more studies came out and more studies came out to eventually Yale came out with the most amazing reports. It finally put a lot of this into concrete conclusions. We lie with the words we say. We've gotten good at lying with our words, so you can't trust anybody anymore. We've gotten good at lying with our facial expressions and our body language. We might be miserable, but we put on a smile and people think maybe Roger's happy.
We found lies are attached to body gestures and movements and words, but that the only thing that's truthful are the sounds you make. That is incredible. Once you understand that people are judging you, liking you, deciding whether they want to be in a relationship with you, decide whether they want to have you join their company. Decide whether they want to fund your project all based on the sounds you make, not the words you're saying. Thank goodness science has made an honest man of me because I’ve been saying this for 25 years and now science supports everything I’ve been saying.
Dustin
Roger, you did a TEDx Talk. In your talk, you talked about helping people discover their real authentic voice. What I found fascinating is you mentioned in that presentation that some of us are trapped by our voices. I wanted to ask you personally, what did you mean by that, being trapped by your voice?
Roger
I start that answer by saying you are not the voice you were born with. You are trapped in a voice that you think you were born with and that's the one that you are stuck with. The one that you hate on your voicemail message, the one that everyone else doesn't like on your voicemail message. You think that's your voice and you're stuck with it. The truth is the voice most people have is simply the learned response to what happened when you were a kid. Let me make this clearer. Your job as a baby is survival. You'd like to get fed, you'd like to get changed, you'd like to be snuggled. Your job is to learn to be an influencer as fast as you can. If your mommy speaks airy and you want to influence her to give you milk, as soon as you can make sound, you're like, “Hungry, mommy, hungry.”
If your dad speaks like a Teamster and your job in life is to not have your feet touch the ground because you want to be carried everywhere. As soon as you can make sound, you're like, “Up, up. Daddy, up,” because you're imitating their sounds, trying to connect with them. It's the exact same thing that happens. If you set me on the street in Nashville with a cowboy hat or no cowboy hat and no boots and I'm walking down the street and someone comes walking up to me and they say, “Howdy,” then before I can even think about it, I say, “Howdy,” but I never said howdy before. Why? Because we live in a mirror culture. To influence the people that are in our environment, we end up trying to sound like them so that they think we're one of them and that we can influence the behavior that we can connect with them.
All of us don't realize the voice that we imitated. If I would have grown up with Stevie Wonder, I'd sound like an amazing gospel singer right now. If I grew up with a country singer, I'd have a drawl. We imitate the sounds we hear. That's what makes my job so amazing. People come into me and they're like, “I don't like my voice. I just heard it on the voicemail.” I'm like, “Good. Let's start from scratch. Let's stop blaming Mother Nature and let's figure out the sounds you should make that will help you achieve the communications you want, to have the life that you want.” That's why I have the most successful people in every occupation, from doctors to lawyers, to teachers, to parents, to the most successful students, to the most famous actors, to the most famous presenters. It isn't a by chance. When you learn how to create the sounds that move people emotionally, your life changes and your career changes.
Dustin
I’ve got to say that one hit close to home. I’ve got two young boys and when you were doing the baby cry about up, it definitely reminded me of home. Thank you for that. It's so spot on. I want to ask you this. Is this a conversation about confidence? Those are confident will project that you can hear the excitement in their voice and, and those that aren't as confident in themselves will be timid and inward. Is it much more than that or is it just about being confident?
Roger
It's a lot more than that because you can be confident and still have no idea how to stop sounding nasal. You can be confident and be loud, but you have no idea how to stop sounding angry. Confidence can give you more volume and maybe make more sound come out. More sound and more volume have nothing whatsoever to do with great sound and specifically great sounds that move people the emotional direction you want to move them to, but it also does. Voice does have a great deal to do with confidence. For example, someone comes in, they're very introverted. I'm like, “I'm an introvert.” They laugh and say, “Roger, how could you possibly be an introvert?” I say, “I'm an introvert. The definition of an introvert is that when they need to recharge their battery, they like to do so alone. I recharge my battery at home on the weekend with my family where I'm not the loudest one, where my mouth isn't open all the time, where my mouth is shut a lot of the time. My ears are open to experience the joys of being a father and a husband and a pet owner.” Confidence.
Someone comes into me and say, “Roger, I'm an introvert. I have a soft voice. I was born that way. Mother Nature did it to me. I don't feel comfortable. I know that speaking in public is the number one fear in America. Count me in on that fear.” I say, “We've got two choices that we could make right now. I could send you to a therapist and you could spend the next ten years trying to figure out all of the reasons that you are shy and that you're afraid to speak in public or I could just show you the sounds of confidence. I can show you how to make those sounds. You'll flip a switch when you want to sound confident, when you want to go into extrovert mode, when it behooves you and the situation. I’ll show you where the switch is. You'll flip it, you'll make those sounds and everyone will react to you like, Billy, you're so confident, Sally. I had no idea you were that strong. Amazing. People will hear the sounds that I give you. You can make and they will react differently to you.”
A few times after people react to you that way, you start thinking, “That was enjoyable. I did find that switch Roger said and I could just switch that at any time. I'm going to use that.” You start enjoying the response from when you showcase more confidence, more strength, and it becomes a part of your personality. It doesn't take anything away from the other parts of your personality that if you want to hide under a rock with me on the weekend, I’ll get you a rock. I’ll get you a nice spot next to my rock. All of these things will build your confidence and it's a lot faster than spending ten years in therapy.
Dustin
You've said there's no difference between speaking and singing. You even alluded to that you started your career training the singers and then you got pulled into training speakers. When you singsong, you've got the singsong voice. When you speak like we're speaking now, we can get that there's a difference. You're saying that there is no difference. How is that so?
Roger
When I started working with singers, I realized that I had specific variables to work with. I had vocal cords, which I had to figure out how to help them use. Vocal cords, just think of them as like guitar strings that live inside of your throat. I have these strings. They live in your throat. The vocal cords had to figure out how to pluck those. I had air because you need to get air in and then you need to control how air comes back out because air is what plucks the vocal cords. I had to get control over air and vocal cords. That's the two biggest factors, the same thing for speakers. You’ve got air coming in and out and you’ve got vocal cords to deal with. Great speaking and singing happens when you learn how to control what your vocal cords can do and when you learn how to control what the air can do then.
Let's be a little more specific. What are the variables to play with as a singer? Pitch. How high or low? Do I want to say is everything up here? Is everything Bee Gees? “Nobody gets too much heaven no more.” It's all up here. My pitch is high or is it down here? Is everything, “You’ll never find another singer down here? Down low.” Is it high or low? Pitch. Pace, which is how fast or slow. Is it how fast or slow am I supposed to sing? Am I supposed to sing fast? Am I supposed to sing slow? Pitch, pace, tone. Am I supposed to sing airy? Am I supposed to sing like I add razorblades for breakfast? What kind of tone is in there? Can I find a way to finally make it? Do I want to have that song or do I want to sound like a little choir boy and, “I love you so?” What tone do I want? Pitch, Pace, tone. Melody. What melody do I want? What's the pattern of the notes? Are they going up? Are they going down? Pitch, Pace, tone, melody and volume. How loud or soft? When a singer goes to sing, they're only thinking about pitch, pace, tone, melody and volume. They're lucky if somebody else wrote the song because the song tells them.
Here's the melody, here's how fast to do it, here are the words. It gives it all. When I started working with speakers, in the beginning I was like, “I’ve got to start over from scratch. There can't be anything that is the same between singers and speakers.” I tried. I studied everything I could study. I kept working with speakers and until I realized there is no difference at all between speaking and singing. Speakers also need to figure out what melodies they're making because most speakers speak like this. “I was just born one note on a piano, so this is monotone. I talk like this. I'm exciting. We're going to go out to dinner tonight, honey. We're going to have Italian. Guess what we're going to have tomorrow night? Italian. Do you like Italian? I'm going to surprise you on the third night. We're going to go for German, but because it sounds just like Italian. It's going to taste like Italian even if it's German.”
Most people speak with no melody or most people speak with a tone that's all airy or they speak with a tone that's all edgy. Most people speak too loud or too soft. I found that all I had to do was teach people how high or low to speak, what melody to use, what tone to use, fix the air and fix what position the vocal cords were in and I was off to the races. Suddenly I had the best sounding speakers in the world because Mother Nature didn't forget them. Mother Nature forgot to put the instruction manual for the voice inside the crib. Maybe my parents lost it on the way home from the hospital. Maybe your parents lost it on the way home from the hospital. Either way, nobody ended up with the manual on how to use voice, how to speak. I just started writing them.
Dustin
I'm a little nervous right now. I'm just going to be frank with you. I’ve been incredibly grateful for everyone and we've done over 100 episodes. Some folks have heard me quite a lot. I am curious by demonstration, me as your guinea pig, your subject here. What is one thing that I can do to improve my voice? Don't make it about me necessarily. I want something that everyone can benefit from, but feel free to use me as the guinea pig.
Roger
First of all, you have a lovely voice and it has what I'm going to call a character to it. Let me take one sentence back. Every single person on the planet, their voice sounds completely different. Their voice is different. If I call you tomorrow or anyone, if they heard this and I call them on their phone tomorrow surprisingly and said, “Do you want to have lunch?” They'd say, “Roger? He gave you my cell number? What kind of a podcast is that? They give out the cell number to their guests?” She would recognize my voice. Everyone has sounds. Everyone is totally different, but everyone falls into certain categories, which I call voice types. You have a character voice, which it's very recognizable, which is great. When people hear your voice, it's very easy to know it's you. Don't you get that a lot? You don't have to call up people and say, “It’s me, your best friend.”
Here are the things that you're doing right. You have a nice melody. You don't stay on one note the whole time. You mix it up and you have what I'm going to call ascending melody, which makes people happy. Ascending melody is like this. You start at a low note and now I'm going up to a higher note. Higher, like I'm walking up the stairs. Like I'm playing the piano and moving from the middle of the piano to the right side. I'm going higher. I'm going up the scale. I'm walking up to scale. That's called ascending melodies. That makes people happy. When you walk up the scale, it makes people happy. “I love my life. I love chocolate. I love podcasts. I love being here with you.” You do a lot of ascending melodies. That's good. People like that. Other people do descending melodies. “I like my life. It's my birthday. This is my hundredth podcast.” They go down the stairs all the time. When they get to a comma, they go down. When they get to a period, they go down. They wonder why people are falling asleep or why they are bored.
It's because they're doing descending melodies. Descending melodies make people sad. Why would you want to make people sad? People do that. 99% of everybody in the population goes down at a comma or goes down at a period because they were told to in elementary school. They were told that the only time they could go up was when there was a question mark. “You like chocolate? You like my wife? Why didn't you tell her before I married her?” You have a great melody. You go up. A lot of your melodies are ascending melody, so that's something that you do well. You also have good volume. You don't sound shouty, you don't sound angry. You do have a tendency though sometimes to fall into that squeaky hinge thing. Do you know that you do that?
Dustin
No.
Roger
“No, Roger. I don't do it.”
Dustin
That was it?
Roger
Repeat after me. “Roger, when I talk, when I have really long sentences, I wonder if I still have enough air by the time I'm at the end.” Say that.
Dustin
“Roger, when I speak really long sentences, I wonder if I can make it to the end because I don't have enough air.” I didn't say it exactly.
Roger
You did say it exactly perfectly. When you got to air, you went to exactly. You made it all the way through to the end and then it went to that. Most people do that. They run out of air by the time they get to the last few words and then they think, “Maybe I'm getting paid by the word.” Then they couple of more out, but there is no air in it. You sometimes have long sentences that end with no air. I want you to only have sentences where the last syllable of the last word still has a note. Instead of going like that, you're going to go like that. Say, “Roger, when I get to the end of the sentence.”
Dustin
Roger, when I get to the end of the sentence.
Roger
Roger, when I get to the end of the sentence.
Dustin
Roger, when I get to the end of the sentence.
Roger
The last word.
Dustin
The last word.
Roger
The last one word. Where's the note?
Dustin
The last word.
Roger
It has to have a note.
Dustin
It has to have a note.
Roger
Because sometimes.
Dustin
Because sometimes.
Roger
I don't have a note on every word.
Dustin
I don't have a note on every word.
Roger
I'm not making my best song or speech.
Dustin
That I'm not making my best song or speech.
Roger
I'm going to make sure every word I say.
Dustin
I'm going to make sure every that I say.
Roger
Every word that I say.
Dustin
Every word that I say.
Roger
See, I don't know what note word is. Every word. There's that note. Every word that I say.
Dustin
Every word that I say.
Roger
Has a melody.
Dustin
Has a melody.
Roger
If I look for this note on the piano, I can't find it because there is no note. Here's how to fix that. You speak in what I'm going to call, I already called it that squeaky hinge thing. Some people listen to it and they think, “Sexy.” You can do it. You can do it sometimes, but I just want you to have control over it. Sexy is good sometimes, but I want you to decide when you want to be sexy. When you don't want to be sexy, when you want to be strong and powerful and musical. Here's your thing. When you breathe, take a breath for me right now. Take a breath and then blow it out. Did you raise your chest and shoulders or did your tummy come forward like you had a balloon?
Dustin
I totally raised my chest and shoulders.
Roger
You do what's called accessory breathing. 95% of the entire population does accessory breathing where they breathe in, they raise their chest and shoulders as if they think that's how Superman would do it. They exhale and then their shoulders come down. That, my friends, is the way to get the least amount of air into the body and the way to have the least control over that air to make great speaking. You want to stop raising your chest and shoulders because your lungs are not in your chest and shoulders. The lungs are lower. You want to pretend you have a balloon in your tummy. Take a breath, inhale and let your stomach come forward. Try that and then blow out the air and let your stomach deflate. Try it again and blow it out.
This is how you Get WealthFit. You change the breathing because when you're speaking, when you're supposed to be speaking, everyone, you're only supposed to speak while your stomach is coming back in. Think of it like the accelerator pedal on your car. You got a brand-new car, you love it. It's shiny. Maybe it's red. You drive it right up to the base of the mountain and you're like, “That's a big mountain. I think I’ll drive my shiny new red car up the mountain.” You take your foot off the accelerator pedal and you're in neutral and you can't go up the mountain and you say, “I don't get it. This is a shiny new car.” It's because you have to push the accelerator pedal, to send more gasoline, to get more power, to get the car, to go forward up the mountain.
Pretend you have an accelerator pedal in your tummy. If your stomach is just stationary all the time because you're moving your chest and shoulders up and down, you don't have an accelerator pedal. What happens is when you take a breath and your tummy comes forward, when you speak and let your stomach come back in, it helps send just the perfect amount of air to the vocal cords. It creates the right volume, the right melodies and the right tones. It makes sure you never get hoarse. Everyone needs to learn how to do diaphragmatic breathing this way. Take a breath. Pretend you have a balloon in your tummy. Speak and let your stomach come in. Here's the good news. You only have to relearn it because every baby in history was born doing diaphragmatic breathing.
You don't look at a baby in the crib and watch their shoulders to see if they're alive. You look at their tummy. You don't look at your puppy sitting on the floor and look at their shoulders to see if your doggy is still alive. You look at their stomach. We were born to breathe, letting our stomachs come forward, and then letting our stomachs come back in. If you do that, you will lose that squeaky hinge. Take a breath for me. Fill up your tummy and then say to me while your stomach is coming in. Did you do it? Your stomach has to come in while you're doing it. Do it again, go higher.
Dustin
It doesn't sound right.
Roger
Do it again. Get out of the basement. You know there are no windows in the basement. Come on up. Come on up to the roof garden. “Roger wants me to only speak when my stomach is coming in.”
Dustin
Roger only wants me to speak when my stomach is coming in.
Roger
Let's go a little lower. “Roger only wants me to speak while my stomach is coming in.”
Dustin
Roger only wants to me to speak when my stomach is coming in.
Roger
Go lower. “Roger only wants me to speak while my stomach is coming in.”
Dustin
Roger wants me to speak while my stomach is coming in.
Roger
When I say lower, I mean lower in pitch. Come down lower. “Roger wants me to speak where I normally do, but my tummy comes in.”
Dustin
Roger wants me to speak where I normally do, but my tummy is coming in.
Roger
“When I do that, I don't have any squeaky hinge sound.”
Dustin
When I do that, I don't have any squeaky hinge sound.
Roger
More air. “When I do that, my stomach comes in.”
Dustin
When I do that, my tummy comes in.
Roger
“I don't have any squeaky hinge at all.”
Dustin
I don't have any squeaky hinge at all.
Roger
“That vocal fry, which used to happen all the time.”
Dustin
That vocal fry that used to happen all the time.
Roger
“Is going to go away when I practice this breathing.”
Dustin
Is going to go away when I practice this breathing. I did it, didn’t I?
Roger
“When I practice this breathing”
Dustin
When I practice this breathing.
Roger
I have to practice more off-air. My evaluation is you have a fantastic voice, lots of personalities. You need to fix the air so that people don't think that they have to hear this sound as much as they do. This sound is less healthy sounding and less emotional sounding than the sound of air mixed in.
Dustin
Thank you big time. That wasn't as painful as I thought. That was great. I appreciate that.
Roger
People have got to be careful.
Dustin
I was a little hesitant there, but I'm glad I did if only to serve as a guinea pig and get people inspired to pay attention.
Roger
Do you know how many people talk like that and think it's cool, but it's not cool when your vocal cords are red, puffy, swollen and they hate you?
Dustin
Roger, I want to conclude our conversation, our talk here and I'm mindful of my practice here. One hundred fifty million CD sales, four top-selling books. You worked with incredible talent. I wanted to ask you this. I just felt my air just leave, so I’ve got some practice to do. In all of your career, what has surprised you the most?
Roger
I think what would surprise everyone the most is that no matter how much talent you have, you still have to match that with work ethic. You might be blessed and be able to do one thing, but that doesn't mean you can do everything, that it's okay to work hard. For example, I mentioned that I just did A Star is Born, the film with Bradley Cooper. I want to say that Bradley worked with me every single day for six months at 7:30 in the morning for about an hour to an hour and a half so that he could learn how to sing. Bradley Cooper already had an instrument before, but he put in the work to do it. What I find surprising, not me anymore. What I did it in the beginning was that no matter how famous people are, no matter how wealthy they are.
No matter how many companies they own, no matter how many billions they have in an offshore account that the IRS doesn't know about, everybody is the same when it comes down to so many basic things. We all need to work hard to be the best at what we want to work at being the best at. The good news is if you want it to be a concert pianist, you'd have to practice about ten hours a day for the rest of your life. Hope that you were reincarnated as somebody who wanted to be a concert pianist so that you could practice another ten hours a day for that lifetime as well. If you want to have an amazing voice, you can change your voice in minutes. You can change your voice in seconds. It's because people don't have any idea what sounds they're making and what sounds they should be making. The surprising thing is you can change a speaking voice in seconds that will change your life forever.
Dustin
That is so powerful and I'm witness of that. Now I'm conscious of it and I'm starting to recognize. Roger, I wanted to ask you, what's the future look like? You've got so many different projects and things that you're working on. What are you excited about?
Roger
I just signed a deal to do my own reality show, where I do transformations. I just signed a deal to do my own podcast with iHeart Media and it's called Love Your Voice. We just finished our 10th episode. We're going to launch that. I'm excited about the podcast. I'm excited that I'm going into the university system. I just signed a fantastic deal where I'm going to be responsible for my content teaching some of the most famous schools in the world how their students should learn how to use business communication. We launched with Forbes College of Business and Technology, 18,000 students. We launched with them. I'm very excited about that, going into the university level so that I can train people how to sound. By the time they graduate, they already have amazing business voices and they already know how to sound to achieve the business life that they want and also be great people.
I'm excited about being here with you. I'm excited about listening to you and how much air you're going to have the next time I speak with you. I'm excited to offer your readers a gift if they would like. One of the greatest programs that I have online is called The Perfect Voice Complete Collection. Let me tell you, I have a very simple goal with my life and it's just that I have to save the world. I know it's just a little tiny goal, but I still want to do it anyways. I have to save the world. The only way I can save the world is one voice at a time. Because if I make people communicate better and they put aside their religious, political, socio-economical boundaries and differences and all learn to create sounds that we can all agree on, then I think I’ll make the world sound better. I think I will make the world a better place to speak in and live in.
In order to do that, I still have a few billion people that I have to reach to join my army of amazing vocalists, speakers, communicators, people who communicate emotion by emotion instead of wasting their time doing word by word. I create programs back to The Perfect Voice Complete Collection, which is my gift for you because I'm going to give your readers a discount. I'm going to give them $50 off The Perfect Voice Complete Collection. If they go to ThePerfectVoice.com and enter the code, WEALTH. You should know how to spell wealth if you want to be wealthy. WEALTH in the promo code section, it will take $50. That will bring the program, which is priceless below $100. I priced my things because I know billions of people need them.
Go to ThePerfectVoice.com, put in the promo code, WEALTH, get your $50 and for under $100, learn what sounds you should be making to achieve the success you feel in your heart you're ready to step up to. Maybe you're already the CEO of a company. Maybe you're already the head of a company. Amazing. Do you know companies like Zappos, Kimberly Clarke and Morgan Stanley, all the biggest companies in the world hire me to come in and fix from the CEO down to create a vocal brand for these Fortune 10, 12, 15 and 20 companies? You'd be surprised how CEOs and business leaders, even the ones that are successful and companies in general, haven't found their voice. A voice that introduces them to the world in the way that they want to be perceived. That's my gift. $50 off my Perfect Voice Complete Collection. I would advise anyone who is serious about hating their voice on their voicemail message that this would be their opportunity to get over that.
Dustin
Roger, thank you big time. I truly appreciate you making this program available, giving us a discount here at Get WealthFit and for our readers. I appreciate what you're up to in the world. Thank you for sharing and using me as a guinea pig and giving me feedback and just doing you, Roger. Thanks big time.                      
Roger
Thank you so much. It was my pleasure and I look forward to talking to you again soon.

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