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Ross Paquette: From "One-Man Show" To A $160M Valuation

We are talking with Ross Andrew Paquette. He is the CEO and the Founder of Maropost, which is North America's fastest growing marketing automation company. He founded Maropost in 2011 and has been able to double its annual growth every year since then. In this interview, we're going to talk about scale. Everyone wants to know how to grow a business quickly. We're going to talk about how he went from a one-man operation in his apartment to now a business valued at over nine figures.

In addition, we're going to talk about work ethic. You're going to discover Ross' mindset and the mindset that he instills in his team members and the people around him. I asked him about burnout as well because it's good to have a good work ethic. We're going to talk about the future of email communication. If you happen to send an email or two to generate business, you're going to want to hear what Ross has to say about the future of communication. A fun one, how do you take overwhelm and channel it into something positive and a whole lot more in this show.

Dustin
It's 2011, you're in the official Maropost headquarters, your apartment. You're working on putting together an email service provider for mass communication, mass emailing. Now you're sitting at the helm of one of Canada's fastest growing companies. An international software service company valued at over $160 million. Is this the vision that you saw back in 2011? Did you imagine you would be where you are or are we not even where your vision is yet?
Ross
It's a bit of both. It started more of the concept of a lifestyle business. I wanted to have ten clients. First and foremost, I never even wanted to start a business. It just made a lot of sense. I was working for other organizations doing similar things and realized I could have ten clients. We could provide a great service. We could provide a great platform and enjoy ourselves at it. The goal back then was to have about $500,000 a year in revenue as an example. It's been a big shift from that as a philosophy. What happened was we never stopped investing in the product. The team was very small. We were about four people back then.
It was the same four people when the company jumped from $300,000 to $3 million to $13 million in revenue. It was an exciting time, but not in the plan. You step back along the way or multiple times and decide, "Now that we've got this organization an organization, what do we want to do with that?" There's a different vision than that. At first, I have ten clients work out of my apartment approach. The future for me is to keep expanding both our product line, our reach and our influence over the community. Not just the tech community, but our customers and their verticals and help them improve. How do we want to use that long-term to better support our overall whether they are philanthropic endeavors, the planet, education? There's a lot in the works there as well.
Dustin
What's your vision? You started off emailing and now you guys do so much more than that. Did you know that early on or was it just you wanted to master email?
Ross
It was email, but it a big part of it was marketing automation. When you think of marketing automation for the most part, the backbone of it is email whether people admit that or not. You could say that was the focus. When I think about the next stages though, now it's more on customer management and relationship management. At the same time, if we're thinking from a support perspective, it's understanding the single customer view or the personas that are the most apparent within your business.
You can go in any number of directions in all of those areas. The most important to me is that single customer view. A lot of people are talking about that. It's not something anybody's doing or doing very well for that matter. A lot of the times it's a lot of platforms that are being integrated into one that doesn't solve the problem for any vertical, SMB or mid-market unless you're an enterprise organization. That brings along a whole slew of different issues. They're not as optimized. We were talking about open rates and engagement. After a while, if you're too big, you become comfortable with the status quo. That needs to start to work its way back, no matter what size the organization or business.
Dustin
You had mentioned some numbers of team members and yet you had a high revenue. I had picked up something that you had twelve-team members and you gain $30 million. That's $2.5 million per employee, which is awesome. How did you pull that off? How did you accomplish so much revenue with such a small team?
Ross
That goes back to the starting point around the plan wasn't to grow that quickly for that matter. I have my CTO at the time, a few other individuals in the development side and a couple of support people overseas. I was running around like a crazy person, selling people, supporting them, handling whatever marketing endeavors we could, responding to tickets, working with invoicing or finance. We didn't have much of an HR needed at that point, but it was across the board. That's also been a big shift for us, moving the business out of that in a way owner operated or centered around one individual into more of a team. That’s certainly something I wish I had spent a little more time on the other stages, but we are where we are now and we can only focus on that for the future.
Dustin
I'm curious because there are other names and people that you see on TV. They run ads. There are other companies that did email. What did you see at the time in terms of opportunity because there were big companies doing email? What did you see?
Ross
A lot of it was product but also support. The starting point was the support aspect. The biggest ones out there, which are now owned by Salesforce, Oracle, IBM and they'd been buried within those companies in certain aspects. Some disappeared entirely into the abyss. It was that support side. It was responding to people quickly with valuable information. No one wants to wait two days to get a response or tell you like, “I'm launching this new strategy or this new campaign. We didn't think about this. We need an answer now." Two days later, it caused a loss of revenue. That was the starting point. We started picking up the product side and the innovation became the core. We were developing features very quickly. We were developing channels very quickly. We added mobile, we added social, we added web and acquisition areas to the initial marketing cloud solution that we had. We segued into that product. Now that we have that framework from a support or product perspective. It's very much becoming about sales and marketing, but not at the expense of or not without the support and product.
Dustin
I remember watching your growth early on. I've been to a couple of events and seeing you use sponsorship as a growth vehicle. Is that one of the key factors you attribute to your success?
Ross
Yes and no. Back when we had twelve people, we didn't have a field marketing team or an events team or any team for that matter. Whether we were lucky or it was good timing or we did well with it. We were able to pick up sponsorships at certain conferences where we would only have two people and there would be 2,000 people at the conference. Our name was out there so much that people couldn't ignore that. We brought in a lot of great customers, great brands and great organizations from that. It's about having the team in place on the marketing side. They can hone and find out what's working, what isn't and be more specific with how we spend. Back then, it was the only thing we could do realistically.
Dustin
Did you focus on an enterprise or did you tailor to the entrepreneurial crowd?
Ross
It was everyone. In the same week, you could be signing an owner-operated business. Maybe it was $5 million in revenue but they're not the largest. The next day you're signing Mercedes Benz as an example. There was no difference between the two. Part of that was exciting at the same time because it's a very different buyer. Going down the enterprise process is not always the most exciting but having that customer on board is amazing. They do things that are very different. Working with somebody where you can show them the product and the vision of what they can do with it. Having them get on board without quickly knowing that if we do this, these are the results we're going to see. That's exciting because you're impacting one person not an organization that has tens of thousands or in some cases, hundreds of thousands of employees.
Dustin
Is it true the sales cycles typically longer in the enterprise?
Ross
Yes, for sure. We've had smaller deals closed on the spot or on the first call. That still happens. An enterprise sale no matter what is still usually months. If you can get it done in a month, that's got to be some record.
Dustin
One event costs you six figures to sponsor, is that true?
Ross
Yes, for sure.
Dustin
For the entrepreneur that's following in your footsteps, whether it's software or whatever the businesses and they're seeing, "All my customers are here at this event." What advice do you have for them in terms of sponsorship as a model of?
Ross
It depends on what the potential revenue from that show is going to be. What product they are selling. If it's recurring revenue in such. We've done six-figure deals probably a few too many times, not in a bad way but more than maybe we needed to. At that point, it has to have a huge amount of brand value if not the customer side or both. Both are ideal. I don't have any advice with that. It would depend on what their products are and how much they can gain out of it.
Dustin
Sometimes these sponsorships are a lot of money, especially if you're a software servicer. You have a smaller end product and you're not going to see an immediate return on that investment.
Ross
We did though. I don't think it was because specifically of Maropost. What we were doing at that time and even now, there's a direct correlation between how the success of those sponsorships came together.
Dustin
You said that critical to your success is the culture of work ethic that you have as a leader, but also in the small team and even now. Will you define work ethic? Is that like everyone on the team is a hustle and grind type of person?
Ross
To me, hustle and grind and literally putting in the hours are the same thing. It comes down to that. You're not running around doing meaningless work as an example. That's usually the argument that some people have like, "I don't need to put in a lot of hours. I'm here doing smart work." That's one of the most frightening statements anybody could ever say to me. That isn't actually. Everyone is hustling in their way. They're grinding in their way. They're putting in that extra effort. It's well-known within our company. I have a huge problem in working or communicating directly with people who don't follow that philosophy. It doesn't matter if they're the front-line support person or either myself, the chairman, CEO, I can't do that. It's my Achilles heel. Even if I know it's going to be a disservice to me, I still can't. Maintaining that as you get and start to grow the team, we're about 150 people. That's harder because everyone is different. They have different goals, different philosophies and different views on how their experience should go there. Having your direct partners, your second, third, fourth in command. For us, our COO or CTO especially, they follow that philosophy and our VPs follow that philosophy. The further you can continue to push that down and be comfortable or excited about it, that's a huge star and a huge benefit.
Dustin
Talk to me about the flip side where you see Google or you see some of these other companies that have these crazy perks and maybe there's a lot of flexibility. It doesn't seem you operate that way.
Ross
We have a lot of I wouldn't say the perks of Google. We don't have people going around giving massages or anything. It's an extremely different philosophy and what they're able to do. Those things have a significant cost to them. That's one of the downsides of the tech space right now is what people are focused on has gotten out of control as opposed to being part of or focusing on making the organization or a company very successful very quickly. They're going to benefit the faster they can do that, especially in a smaller organization. The Googles, IBMs, Oracles, Apples, Salesforce of the world, they're already large. The upside isn't huge anymore. There's no exit to happen. There's no going public and your options are now worth ten or twenty or whatever times that they were. For us, it's not about competing with that. It's about being part of something that's going to grow into another version of those. Hopefully, we can keep that entrepreneurial aspect all the way through it.
Dustin
How do you as a leader keep your eye on burnout? Is that something that you look at for yourself and even your management team and maybe even down a couple of levels? Is that something on your mind?
Ross
Not as much as it pertains to the day-to-day aspects. In my understanding, burnout comes from more of the thought-provoking or the deep thoughts that you come up with yourself as opposed to the day-to-day execution sides of things. It's not to say people can't burn out from that as well. If you can remove a lot of the stresses and the issues that somebody might be running into in their personal life. We have one individual where we don't want that person to have to go out for dinner. We don't want them to do anything. We want to help them with their personal side to make it as easy as possible. That way we know they're not going to have the stresses of thinking about that. We'd rather send someone else. That's one example of how I would want somebody to avoid burning out in those personal areas as opposed to at work.
Dustin
What are your personal secrets or the company's secrets for attracting the right talent and finding people that adopt this mindset?
Ross
It's very hard. There are definitely components of luck and timing at the same time as that. You have to run a strong process these days. When I say process, reviewing enough candidates, bringing in more of a panel or a group of individuals to assess that person. I will say one of my largest faults is on the hiring side. I come from the background where Dustin says, "I can definitely do all that. I can make your dreams come true." I'm like, "Come on board." Sure enough six months or six weeks later, I'm like, "Why did you leave at 3:00 yesterday?" I don't know anyone who is successful on this planet who's leaving the office at 3:00. That's been a frustrating lesson to learn. Sometimes you have to go through multiple iterations. Hopefully, you can go through less of those to get to the right person. You have to have more of a process around it. That is by far the most important thing in terms of the next stages of Maropost. Probably was one of the most important things as we were growing that maybe wasn't focused on as much.
Dustin
I want to go back a little bit to the expansion. You do many things beyond sales automation and email. As soon as you expanded into an area, that puts you in competition. If you say, "I'm going to be a CRM," Salesforce essentially is a competitor because they provide that and Keap and all the other ones. How do you combat that? When you expand out and you've got new competitors, how do you look at that?
Ross
In certain areas, you mentioned two good examples on the opposite ends of the spectrum. Salesforce is focused on everyone, but their main focus is on enterprise clients. Deep down to their core, they're like, "We're significant organization but we want to sell companies who are spending $5 million a year or more with us." I think if they could have all their customers in that environment, everyone would but that's especially what they want. The opposite is Keap or Infusionsoft. They're in the SMB almost and with the Keap launch, the SMB of the SMB. We're much more focused on the midmarket as an example. Companies who don't want to overcomplicate their CRM or eCommerce or marketing automation needs, they want a true partner who's going to grow with them at the same time and help them grow.
They're not so small that they can't invest in that area. The Infusionsoft is for people who are doing $100,000, $200,000, maybe even $500,000 in revenue. When you start getting into $1 million, $2 million, $5 million, it's not for them. They know that and it's not a negative. It's the opposite of Salesforce. That's when people have to make that decision to move into a technology suite or move forward with a partner that's going to be suitable for that next stage. Hopefully, that next stage gets them to the end of the line.
Dustin
According to Crunchbase report, you raised $37 million in 2016. Is that true?
Ross
It's a bit of a unique contract. One thing I'm very proud of is Maropost has always been built as a profitable company. We've never had to raise money for growth or anything like that. That's very exciting that component brings along different challenges and aspects of it. That did happen.
Dustin
How did you come to that decision to go do a raise?
Ross
In a way it makes sense. From a financial perspective, it's common sense. If you've built your company up to a certain size and you're like, "I would like to take some chips on the table and do something for my family or for my team," that's a great way to do it. That was certainly the key to that decision process at the time. In tertiary aspects of it, you're bringing on individuals who are hopefully going to help you grow the business, grow yourself as an individual and start to expand the organization in different directions that maybe you wouldn't have thought of. That's been the focus on.
Dustin
Would you do it again?
Ross
No, I wouldn't for other reasons. Maropost is a very unique business in terms of how it started and how it's built. There are philosophical differences that people have when they come from a finance background versus an operations background versus a founder background. Those don't always align. It's not that I wouldn't do it. I would approach it very differently because at the time, I've never raised capital. I'm not coming from that background of I had to go out there and pitch to 50 or 100 or 500 organizations to raise money to start my company. I had to pitch a second time to raise more. I have a lot of friends who have done that. That's a specific skill set. When you don't, you're not thinking of maybe all of these aspects. You're thinking of, "We're going to bring in this partner. Everything is going to be great." That's not necessarily what has happened.
Dustin
I'm interested in Maropost Cares. Tell me how that came to be and what you're doing with that.
Ross
That is pretty much something I'm handling on the personal side. When we did set it up, it's meant to be more of a charitable organization where we're focusing on other organizations that are doing things we're very proud of. It's all environmental or animal kingdom related. Where I see that going though in terms of the future is certainly it becomes its own organization where we put on events. We bring in our friends, our partners and clients and so on to raise funds for specific projects or strategies that those same organizations that we support are looking to grow within. As you started to get into what the philosophy of doing all of this for, that's where I would want to focus a lot of our resources. What's the point after a certain level, there's no need from a financial perspective to buy a bigger house or buy more cars? You can only drive one at a time. You can only live in one at a time. I come from a very simplistic background. I don't have much from an asset perspective that would expend a lot of my energy because that's not my business. My business is growing software as a service company.
Dustin
You travel quite a bit. You're at the helm of this rather large enterprise. I'm sure you go back to the city where your headquarters is, but you travel. How is it that you're able to pull that off running a large business in different parts of the world?
Ross
That's new as of mid-last year, the travel side. For seven or ten years for that matter, even prior to Maropost, it was 24/7, 365 business. No matter what was going on in life that was more or less priority number one. As we were going through that process of building that team that I was mentioning before and things were becoming more apparent and more successful. I wanted to understand what I wanted to do in terms of the next stages and that made it easier. I had not been able to travel anywhere meaningful or in a meaningful way before that. You do have to, in a way, step back and start to think about what the next stages are. Otherwise, you're thinking about that same set of goals or priorities that you were going back many years. You can’t start to expand and "What do I want to do differently? What do I want my team to experience in the organization? What do I want our employees or our values to be here?” You can't do that when you are hustling and grinding 24/7 for ten years.
Dustin
Are you doing more on the PR side?
Ross
Not really. I tend to shy away from that. I enjoyed doing podcasts. In terms of speaking and PR, in general, that's not my thing. It never was before. I would stick to the things that I liked doing and some of our team members, they're welcome to handle the rest.
Dustin
What's your day-to-day look like now?
Ross
Being outside of Toronto or Chicago for the most part, it's a lot of review more than anything. Understanding where we're seeing successes, where we are and what's next in terms of roadmaps, whether it be product or hiring or on the team or from a financial standpoint. I speak to our COO every hour that the two of us are awake. That's very much the philosophy. We both came to the conclusion which was going to be most advantageous for the company. It came from a book called Rocket Fuel. They talk about the visionary integrator roles in companies. It's not that I consider myself a visionary. When you look at the struggles that the founder or the individual who had to start the organization come up with and how they view certain things in HR, finance, marketing and sales areas. They are not always the best person that should be managing those individuals directly. That's been phenomenally helpful both on a personal and professional side.
Dustin
I meant to squeeze this question earlier. It's to ask you about the future of email because anytime a new technology comes out, they say like, "Print is dead and email is now dead. We’ve got social media." What's the future of email?
Ross
I can't remember which publication it was, but it was Media Post or something that said, "Email is dead." There was a post up that says, "The new channel, email." Email is still the highest returning channel in the space. Everybody jumps on the bandwagon of social. Mobile is making what feels like a second or even third come around. We have a lot of customers talking about SMS. A lot of customers are talking about push and in-app messaging and that component. Those areas though, ROI has never been as strong. Email is consistent and constant, if anything going up because of the cost to execute those strategies are the ROI on it. In terms of changes, I don't think anything is changing realistically. In terms of how you're targeting people, that's probably the biggest component. There's a huge focus on understanding your customer base, your subscriber base or your prospect base.
Being able to analyze that information to better message them, which has been around for many years now, it's becoming more home. It's becoming more of a data conversation or analytics or reporting conversation than it is a sending perspective. Where we do well with our customers and where companies should always be focused on is getting the setup or the strategy right from the start. A lot of times it doesn't matter who you're working with, Salesforce, IBM, Maropost, Infusionsoft. They're coming in very quickly because they wanted to make whatever change they were making. They ignore those five or ten core strategies that should have been implemented, because once they were implemented, they were running on their own. I've always been a huge fan of automation in general but certainly on the marketing side because people only have a certain amount of time in the day. If you have to spend too much time making changes or logging in, it's going to slow everything down.
Dustin
What's the future for Maropost? What are you most excited about?
Ross
For the same reason, we're bringing together that single customer view. When you're thinking about the customer journey not just from a marketing or acquisition standpoint, but through the cycle after they have purchased your product whether it's physical, digital, informational, what happens after? If we are still marketing to Dustin, as an example, after he's already purchased, how do we ensure that he had a good experience the first time? How do we ensure that the individuals in the customer's company know who he is and know what would be most important to him and know, "Is he even looking at this product six times in the last two days?" It's not down to one person having to look at that. Maybe I want to handle this support situation differently. Maybe his last product didn't get shipped and he has a lifetime value with us of $5,000. We're going to treat him a lot different than somebody who has a lifetime value of $20. Nobody can understand that because there's not a lot of technology around that. They're doing it trying to figure it out in multiple ways. Over time, that's what gets lost.
Dustin
I want to move us into WealthFit Round. It's our fancy name for rapid fire questions. Most worthwhile investment?
Ross
The company.
Dustin
When life is good and you're making a difference and you're making money at the same time, what's that guilty spending splurge?
Ross
Travel.
Dustin
Favorite places?
Ross
I'd say Spain and the Bahamas.
Dustin
Any hidden places that you're a little hesitant to share with us because once you share it, people will go there?
Ross
I would hope people go there. Ibiza in Spain is certainly phenomenal. I'd see the Northern Islands within Exuma. Both in Spain and the Bahamas. Ibiza is a magical place. People associated it with partying and all kinds of things. You can do that if you want, but that's not a dominating quality of the island. The Bahamas is so tranquil. There's no one there. It's crystal clear blue waters. It's warm. If I could spend every day there, I probably would.
Dustin
Do you have an uncanny ability to remember people that you meet?
Ross
I do with people I meet, but I have borderline Alzheimer's at this stage. It depends on the day.
Dustin
Because you met so many people?
Ross
Maybe I do have a better memory than I think because people will come up to me. They're like, "How did you remember me? I met you seven years ago.” It's a random location. Yes, maybe I do.
Dustin
Is that DNA?
Ross
It's certain situational and certainly with people's faces that you can always remember their names. I wouldn't say it’s always the easiest.
Dustin
The life of an entrepreneur, especially one with a fast-growing company, you've got to learn to say no. What have you become better at saying no to help you get to the next level?
Ross
It's things that one, negatively impacts myself and two, negatively impacts the company.
Dustin
What would be an example?
Ross
Your life is your own. At the end of the day, while you certainly care about and you want everybody to be successful around you. You want to be supportive to their needs and their wants and so on and so forth. It is your life. There are a lot of individuals out there that will want to control that or get in the way of that or won't see it the same way that you do. That's totally fine and respectable that anybody would think that way. You have to focus on yourself. If you're not happy or your business isn't successful, that's going to be core to what impacts you on a day-to-day basis. That's a big problem for founders.
There are a lot of both positive and negative stories, but not everyone is going to come out as a Salesforce. It comes down to this one person achieving every possible dream that they could ever want, both in business, professionally, financially, their family and so on. Those are one in millions or tens of millions of businesses. Stepping back and making sure that even though the path isn't going maybe in a certain direction or somebody else outside of your control wants it to go in a certain direction. Maybe that's not best for you. You're the entrepreneur. You're the investor. You're the business in certain cases. You have to deal with what's going to be best for you and what's going to make you the happiest.
Dustin
Do you have any special routines or rituals you do to get yourself going at peak state?
Ross
The hardest thing is maintaining a routine because I'm never in the same location for very long. You can't have one and especially when you start to factor in time zones on top of that. Over the several months, I am constantly moving between nine time zones. I had nine or even ten times zones in any given month and any given week in some cases. That's difficult. I do 100 pushups a day. That's my commitment. I'm not saying I've been consistent with that, but if I do 100 pushups every day, I maintain a great level of fitness. They're apparently called mountaineers, although I call them monkey pushups, where you do a push-up and pull your knee up to your arm. That was by far the best because you're getting your core. You're getting your shoulders, your chest, your back and so on. It's crazy because if I just do 100, everything is good.
Dustin
Who do you learn from? Who are your mentors?
Ross
I have an advisor or mentor who also resides on our board. He's very helpful especially when it comes to human interaction, hiring, working both within the company and outside of it. Growing my views or expanding my views on what I want to accomplish in the end, whether it's for me, whether it's for the company, or whether it's for neither for that matter. That's very helpful. I'm known as not being a reader, which tends to come up all the time on these podcasts. I'm spending a lot more time reading and listening to other podcasts. It's because of my view. As I started early on, I was less mature on this front. I wanted to do what I wanted to do.
I was lucky enough and benefited from the fact that it always seemed to work out. For the most part, it worked out. As life and business gets more complicated, you do need to understand the experiences of others. What they could have done differently or what they would have or what they did that made the situation or the timeline a lot better or stronger or easier for that matter. I'm spending a lot of time with that. I don't have a heavy background of having mentors or people behind me, which is something I'm both proud of. At the same time, I wish I had spent a little more time on that in the early stages.
Dustin
What do you do when you get overwhelmed?
Ross
That rarely happens. One of my superpowers is I have an ability to channel all of the negative energy that tends to come in, back out as positive energy. In the early stages of the business, if we had financial struggles, I would go out and find more customers. If we were having marketing struggles, I would do more sponsorships, go to trade shows and make things happen. That is still the case. As the business expands and changes that, you can't use that strategy in all scenarios. The travel helps with that. You can take your mind off of what's going on. Keeping busy, that's a big one. There's nothing worse than the idle mind where you're focusing. I'm sure it's the same for you as well and many of the people in this building. If you're not doing anything or you're not moving forward, you are moving backward really quick. That's been tougher, especially as my role in day-to-day has expanded or changed.
Dustin
Looking back over your career and over your life, what would you say is your defining moment? When I say defining moment, I'm talking about a point in your life where you made a decision and now looking back, you're like, "If I had gone that way, my whole life would be different." What is that moment?
Ross
That's many years ago. I was living in Ottawa, Canada, which is our capital. I was working three jobs. I was at a bar, at a hotel and I was working for another company in the transportation industry at the time. I decided one day, I was like, "I'm going to quit all of these jobs and go travel for a little while." About three or four days later, a family friend called me up and said, "I have started at this tech company as a VP of sales. I'm looking inside sales reps." It would have been a third of the money I was making previously but I was like, "I'll give it a shot."
Very quickly I went from that inside sales role to, within about a year and a bit, I was a director of sales for another company in the tech space. That other company was in the email marketing automation space that kicked it off. If I hadn't done that, we wouldn't be sitting here. I always think about the people who were responsible for those changes. As an example, when I started at that first company, that individual I was working with turns out we had known each other from living in Ottawa. He went to another company and immediately brought me up to the CEO of that organization and said, "This guy is a junior but he's awesome." I came in. I met the CEO and he asked me a couple of questions. I answered correctly. He's like, "You're hired. Come in tomorrow." If that hadn't happened, maybe we wouldn't be sitting here.
Dustin
Ross, thank you for being on the show and doing what you do. If folks want to keep tabs and they want to learn about Maropost, they want to see where you are in the world, what's the best way for them to do that?
Ross
If anybody wants to know anything about Maropost, www.Maropost.com. I use my Instagram a fair amount if I travel and lifestyle perspective. It's @RossAndrew, Twitter is also @RossAndrew. That’s certainly the best areas for us.
Dustin
Thank you, big time. I appreciate you sharing the wisdom and the journey. It's our hope that the next guy or gal out there, go and start their own companies. Thanks for inspiring many others.
Ross
Thanks so much for having me.

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With his infectious and exhilarating energy, Brant Pinvidic gives us the inside scoop on reality television in Hollywood and entertains us using his infamous 3-minute rule! Unleashing the very business secrets that made him the most sought after C-level consultant in Hollywood and beyond, Brant shocks the business world by saying less to get a little more of out his business.

How Saying Less Can Get You More

podcast
Do You Really Need A Business Plan?

In this informative episode, corporate trainer and world renowned speaker at Nevada Corporate Headquarters, Jason Smith takes us through his journey from radio to corporate speaker, while exploring and steps to succeed in business and answering the question every entrepreneur has: Do you really need a business plan?

Do You Really Need A Business Plan?

article
How to Write a Food Truck Business Plan [Template Included]

Starting a food truck? Learn how to write a business plan that will get you funding, co-founders, and more! Use our template to get started ...

How to Write a Food Truck Business Plan [Template Included]

Nathan Wade

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podcast
Connecting Extraordinary People With Extraordinary Lifestyles

Go behind-the-scenes with real estate agent to the stars, Rod Watson. This former athlete shares his humble beginnings helping struggling families with short sales to now working with high-end clientele. Meet the L.A. VIP Agent and hear his personal branding secrets.

Connecting Extraordinary People With Extraordinary Lifestyles

Digital Nomad

Digital Nomad

How To Free Yourself From the Ordinary, Travel the World, and Make Money Online

Laura Petersen

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podcast
Dirty Windows, 'The Pit' & How To Decide

Former options trader, Chris Beer, reveals her journey from the trading floor to consulting business owners how to "escape the grind" by optimizing their business, based on numbers.

Dirty Windows, 'The Pit' & How To Decide

podcast
The Opt Out Life

Rethink success, reinvent rich and realize the life you want by "Opting Out." Listen in as Nate Broughton & Dana Robinson share how to create your own path in life.

The Opt Out Life

article
Business Valuation: How Much is Your Business Worth?

Learn how to value any small business using this simple formula that applies a business’s EBITDA to it’s industry multiple.

Business Valuation: How Much is Your Business Worth?

Nathan Wade

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Product Branding

Product Branding

How To Create a Product Everyone Knows, Likes, Trusts … and Buys From

Rick Cesari

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Credit Secrets for Entrepreneurs

Credit Secrets for Entrepreneurs

How To Use Business & Personal Credit To Launch Your Startup

Gerri Detweiler

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Profitable Podcasting

Profitable Podcasting

How To Launch, Grow, and Monetize Your Own World-Class Podcast

Chris & Katie Krimitsos

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podcast
Feeling Invincible, Marketing Martha Stewart & Dropping 76 Pounds!

Once Sayan Sarkar finally quit his full-time job, his side hustle business took off and generated 10x the amount of money he was making at his office job. He shares tips and tricks to how he was able to make this happen.

Feeling Invincible, Marketing Martha Stewart & Dropping 76 Pounds!

podcast
Born To Sell, Tripling Revenue & the Silver Tsunami

Are you investing in home care marketing? In this episode, The Hurricane explains why this industry is worth your hard-earned money.

Born To Sell, Tripling Revenue & the Silver Tsunami

Get On TV

Get On TV

How To Pitch To Producers & Land TV Coverage For Your Idea, Product, or Story

Nicole Dunn

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podcast
Conquering Cancer, Making Movies & Selling Businesses

This Cancerpreneur didn’t let the bad news of illness get in the way of his entrepreneurial spirit and positive mindset.

Conquering Cancer, Making Movies & Selling Businesses

Free PR

Free PR

The Hustler's Guide To Capturing Media Attention & Getting Eyeballs on Your Brand

Nicole Dunn

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article
How To Build Your Business Credit Score — To Get Loans & Low Interest Rates

Learn how to build your business credit score so you can get access to business loans and credit cards with low interest rates.

How To Build Your Business Credit Score — To Get Loans & Low Interest Rates

Michelle Black

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article
Do You Have What It Takes To Be An Entrepreneur?

In her new book “Women with Money,” Jean Chatzky gives us the top 5 traits of successful entrepreneurs. [Excerpt]

Do You Have What It Takes To Be An Entrepreneur?

Jean Chatzky

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Start Your Own Precious Metals Business

Start Your Own Precious Metals Business

How To Flip Gold, Silver, Platinum, & Diamonds for Profit

Matt Wallace

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article
How to Fund Your Business with Government Grants

Who doesn't want cash from their favorite Uncle Sam? Here's how you can find grants and fund your business with free government money.

How to Fund Your Business with Government Grants

Ian Chandler

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article
How Much Do You REALLY Need to Start a Business? The Answer is Less Than You Think.

Think starting a business takes TONS of money? It doesn’t have to. Here’s how you can build your empire without breaking the bank.

How Much Do You REALLY Need to Start a Business? The Answer is Less Than You Think.

Jon Westenberg

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article
Bootstrap Your Startup & Kickstart Your Success

Launching a startup without investors may seem like a one-way ticket to failure—but it’s one of the best ways to kickstart your business.

Bootstrap Your Startup & Kickstart Your Success

Ian Chandler

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article
How to Lead Employees to Greatness: Your (Hormonal) Strategy for Success

Consider and stimulate (the right) hormones for your team. Embrace leadership tactics that foster healthy hormonal teams.

How to Lead Employees to Greatness: Your (Hormonal) Strategy for Success

Jill Huettich

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