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Seth Greene: Averting Abduction, Becoming Influential And Doing Whatever It Takes

We're covering a lot in the show with a special guest. His name is Seth Greene. He’s a guy that I've known for quite some time from the marketing entrepreneurial world.

You're going to find out how Seth averted an abduction using Krav Maga. He was a grown man being kidnapped. I can't wait for you to hear that because it's quite fascinating.

Then we move onto talking about how you can become a person of influence. For those of you who want to start a business or have a business right now, it’s extremely important. It's what we're doing right now. It's podcasting being a big part of that formula. If you're looking to get clients, looking to attract business or at least started, a great strategy is being seen as the center of influence. We dive into that. How you can be seen as the influencer in your marketplace or even on a national level. We even talk a little bit about Kevin Harrington from Shark Tank and Steve Forbes and how any of us could rub shoulders with them.

We’re going to talk about the shock and awe box. You don't have to be in business or want to start a business to benefit from this. This is a very powerful marketing strategy that allows you to set foot and gain access into places that you might not even with good old fashion knocking on a door and calling every day. The shock and awe box is a very powerful strategy to get your foot in any doors.

Dustin
There you are, you're excited, Seth. You are traveling across the country to go to a speaking gig, a business venture and you go out. It’s pre-Uber and you go do what you normally would do. You go get a taxi, go get a cab and this led to an almost abduction. You're not a kid at this point, you were a grown man and yet someone tried to abduct you and take your things, take your belonging and who knows what else would have happened, but you escaped obviously because we're having this conversation. You’ve got to walk us through. What happened?
Seth
I landed at LAX. I was going to speak in an event on the Queen Mary or Queen Elizabeth the cruise ship. There was no Uber so I walked out to the taxi stand. I went to Long Beach to get on the boat and most of the taxis didn't want to go to Long Beach. There was a long line waiting for a taxi and I hate waiting in line. I shout it out, “Anybody, who can give me a ride to Long Beach?” This late, older, heavyset European lady comes up to me and says, “I’ll take you to Long Beach, you come with me.” I said, “Okay.” We’re crossing the median and we crossed the next median. We start heading towards the parking garage and I got this Spiderman spider sense tingling like something's wrong. I said, “I'm sorry I changed my mind.” You're not supposed to go the parking ramp with a stranger. “I'm going to go back and wait in the long line. Thank you anyway,” she said, “No, it's fine. You come with me, I’ll take you to Long Beach.” I said, “I don't think I got your business card,” and she goes, “Here's the business card.” I handed her the business card, I looked at it and we were still walking toward the parking ramp. She was starting to look around. She's got this furtive, suspicious looking all over the place.
It's not rubbing me right. I said, “I'm sorry. I changed my mind. I'm going to go back and wait in line.” I start turning and I start heading back and she runs to keep up with me and she says, “Give me my business card back.” My wise mouth probably got me into trouble and I said, “If you're legitimate, why would you want your business card back?” You would have thousands of them and you'd want more people to have them. It’s like a marketing question. She grabs me and tries to start dragging me into the parking ramp where presumably, I guess her partners were waiting to knock me out and take my stuff or kill me or whatever they were going to do. I've got a huge suitcase in one hand, a water bottle and her business card in the other and she's dragging me. I'm a black belt in Krav Maga, which is the Israeli military combat system.
I let go of the suitcase, let go of the water bottle, broke her bear hug, attacked her. She screamed and started running away at which point I picked up my suitcase, ran across the median, went to airport security and they said, “Yes, she was the roper. She was supposed to get you in where they would have either knocked you out and taken your stuff right away or they would have put you in a car, driven you somewhere and done God knows what. By the time we get over the parking ramp, they'll be gone anyway. It happens all the time. LAX is too big to police. You're lucky you survived. How did you know not to go in the parking ramp?” I said, “I just got a bad feeling about it. I remember reading something somewhere,” and the guys were like, “How did you escape?” I told them I take Krav Maga and they said, “We take Krav Maga.” We started talking about that and my instructor from all the way in Buffalo, New York had flown to LA to do training for law enforcement and they had him as their teacher. It’s a small world.
Dustin
I always remember at the airport back in the day before Uber and maybe it still happens now. It says don't get into cars with strangers or if they're not in the taxi line, don't approach them. You don't think about that until you hear a story like you just shared, that still rocks it. Thank goodness for Uber and Lyft.
Seth
Although it's funny, my wife still has never taken an Uber and she's like, “You're getting into a car with a stranger.” I take them every single time when I go to speak somewhere now I don't even think about it because if they killed you, they get a bad review.
Dustin
I've been meaning to ask you about your show. I want to tailor our conversation into podcasting and business and marketing of course. I wanted to ask you what prompted you because I had been thinking about doing podcasts for such a long time. It took me doing this at WealthFit to jump in and do it. What pushed you over the edge to get into doing this?
Seth
I became a podcaster accidentally. I had done a series of interviews for my fourth or fifth book called Cutting Edge Marketing Magic. They had no production value because I was at FreeConferenceCall.com. You heard the ringing, you heard me talk, so and so there. You heard all of that and I was just recording the interview to transcribe, edit and turn it into a book. After I did that, we published the book. We launched the book. We did great. I had started listening to podcasts at that time. It was a few years ago and I realized most of these podcasts are just interviews. I just did a bunch of interviews, I'm going to throw them up on iTunes and see what happens. I didn't know any better. The production quality was the unedited raw phone call. There are no bumpers, no intro, no music. It's like you hear the ringing of the phone, you hear the secretary. It's awful but the content, once you got into the interview, was really good. I figured I did fifteen interviews. If I air one a week, I'm good for at least three months before I have to do any more interviews.
I started airing them every week and the thing took off. Despite the lousy production value, I got all kinds of positive feedback about the content and more importantly, I got business from it. People wanted to hire me for what we were talking about in the interviews and hire my company, MarketDominationLLC.com. I said, “There's something to this. I need to turn this into a real show,” at which point we got studio equipment. We got sound engineers. We got bumpers, we got intros, we got music. We made it sound good and it's taken off since then, even though I fell into it accidentally. Once we started doing it on purpose and marketing it, it took off and a large percentage of our business now is producing podcasts, turning them into books and making our clients the authority in their marketplace, whether they're a business owner or an investor looking for more deals.
Dustin
iTunes, Seth, has shown me 299. Is that the number or are they truncating some of them?
Seth
They're truncating. We've gone way past 300 episodes.
Dustin
That is still a lot. I'm curious starting from those free calls and it's humbling. Just get started. I think a lot of people, they want to get the equipment, they want to get it perfect and that was me too. I was in that boat. I wanted everything to be lined up. You just got going. In the 300-plus shows that you've done over the years, what were some things that have surprised you along the way?
Seth
Things that have surprised me, how easy it was to get amazing people to say yes to do the show. Now the marketplace evolved a little bit over the last few years to the point that people are starting to ask questions before they say yes like, “How many listeners do you have? How many downloads?” Those are only in the marketing world and folks who might be podcasters or who are on the cutting edge. Your average local entrepreneur or investor, no one's ever going to ask that question. I wanted to learn. My latest book, Market Domination for Podcasting, is in Barnes & Noble, Walmart and Target now. I interviewed a dozen or so of the top podcasters in the world people with followings in the millions. I asked them how they did it, how they grew and how they make money?
The hole in the marketplace I found was almost every one of them was using a podcast to make money by selling advertising, selling sponsorships, affiliate commissions. The average business owner-investor doesn't want a second job selling advertising. They don't want to knock on doors and cold call and try and sell ads on their show. We designed our process to be profitable from episode one with no following whatsoever. We've got a golf coach who started out at local lessons at $75 an hour. His first couple of episodes of his podcast when there were nine listeners and six of them worked for me, he generated six figures in business. They don't need 10,000 or 100,000 listeners. They just need maybe the right 100 people to listen to that show and it can completely change their business.
Dustin
The authors, the speakers, experts on a national level, it plays into it. It's a platform and I'm sure you can add some things later on to that. Let's talk about the plumber or the attorney in the local DC area or San Diego or something like that. When should they be doing podcasting? If they're just getting started, should they be working on revenue-generating activities? Should they be doing this? Give us some clarity about when someone should tackle this if they're a small business owner.
Seth
Podcasting should be a revenue-generating activity. That's the only reason why we do it. It’s to make our clients’ money. It should be on your list of revenue-generating activities and one of your top priorities simply because there's no faster, cheaper, better way to become an authority in your marketplace. Let's take that local personal injury lawyer for example. One of the things he could do, people he could interview on his show, who else is going to see the personal injury clients. He could interview chiropractors. He could interview massage therapist. He could interview pain management doctors. I don't know how far he's willing to push the envelope. He could interview emergency room doctors. He could interview all of the other people in the supply chain who see his clients maybe before the insurance agents and maybe even before he does. By them sharing the show, they're promoting themselves. They're not even thinking that they're promoting the PI lawyer, but by that chiropractor telling all his clients, “I was just on the show,” God forbid, the next time or they get into an accident or somebody they know gets into an accident, they're going to say, “My chiropractor was on the show. You should listen to it,” and next thing they know that PI lawyers getting a phone call going, “I heard your show and I need some help.”
Dustin
Seth, do you see it as podcasting for the small business or for anybody really? You see it for monetization, but it's not necessarily a direct monetization because we're not talking sponsorship, although that is an avenue. You're talking about using this as having your foot in the door, to talk to people maybe that wouldn't talk to you or don't have the time for you because they're busy doing their thing. You've got this platform, you’ve got this little spotlight you can shine on them. Is that how you're monetizing this?
Seth
There are three ways to grow your business with a podcast and I've got a whole online course on this. Interview your ideal referral sources like we talked about. Interview your ideal clients to build a relationship with them and then interview your existing clients because they will love you even more for putting them on the show. They'll share it as well and get it out to people in their following.
Dustin
It's not necessarily that you have to have a subscriber base to the show. You're just leveraging what you've already got.
Seth
The golf coach, we created a program for him, which was the last golf lesson ever, which was for fortune 500 CEOs that were $100,000 a year to be in his golf coaching program. They flew him around the world in their private jets to coach them their dream courses. He would interview those Fortune 500 CEOs about golf in business on the show because they never get to talk off in business. Their wife doesn't want to hear about it. They get to talk for twenty minutes, 30 minutes about golf and how they use it on the business, networking and stuff like that. They're thrilled to show off about golf, business and how smart they are. One of the magic questions is what’s your biggest challenge? In this case, his question was, “What’s the biggest challenge in your golf game?” They would say, “My hook. My slice. My drive,” or something like that. After the show, he'd send them a shock and awe box in which was a video going, “You said your slice is your biggest challenge. I made a short training video about how you can help eliminate your slice and then there's some information about my last golf lesson ever program.” After the video, they would watch the thing, pick up the phone and go, “This is amazing. How do I sign up?”
Dustin
Seth, I want you to break it down because you and I, we know the marketing language. The shock and awe box, that's a big opportunity for a lot of folks missing out on it. Explain the shock and awe box and why it works.
Seth
A shock and awe box is a big box that is filled with stuff that they're not expecting. In this case, the box was an aluminum flight case. It looks like the secret service would carry the bomb codes and it looks like an aluminum briefcase. In it was custom foam inserts, I’ve heard they’re like a dollar, that was holding a DVD player with a DVD that says a personal message from the golf coach to the potential client about them. Underneath it was all the stuff you wanted them to read. You can put these things together. I've had people who didn't use the briefcase, who used a FedEx box and it wasn't as nice just to save money. We've had clients who did it anywhere from $30 to $300.If your potential revenue is enough, in this case it was $100,000 or more, it's easily justifiable that, “I can spend $2,000, $3,000 sending out ten of these because if I spend $3,000 and $100,000 back, I'll take that return on investment all day long.”
Dustin
The shock and awe box is a strong play. It's going to make sense for your customer value, your client value. Showing up in the mail, it's something that people aren't doing. It's a great opportunity, especially for higher net worth clients or higher dollar clients do something a little different, get the right thing. It's incredibly smart for you to be using that.
Seth
We're even using it for a real estate investor where he's trying to buy apartment buildings and he's got a list of his dream apartment buildings. We’re direct mail to the owners of the apartment buildings with advertising or lead generation, a free report about why they may not have considered selling their building, but why they should and why they should sell to him. When they request more information, they get a shock and awe box in the mail all about why it can be stressful to be an apartment building owner and why if they ever want to sell, they should talk to this guy. It's working like crazy.
Dustin
I want to get us back to podcasting, especially this question. We've had your co-host on the show excited to have his episode out, Kevin Harrington from Shark Tank. Seth, you already had a podcast, obviously having a celebrity attached to you is a big benefit. Walk us through a little bit of what your thought process was to get Kevin on the show, rebrand the show and what has happened since.
Seth
Kevin has been a friend and client for years and we've done some consulting work for As Seen On TV back before he sold it on how to fill the holes in his marketing funnel. He and I speak at a lot of some of the same events, although he speaks a lot more than I do. We were always at three to six of the same marketing conferences every single year sharing the stage together. We always have dinner. We always make it a point to grab a meal together. He was like, “We hadn't done anything together in a while but be friends.” He said, “We should be doing something together. You've been tripping on me for the next thing forever. I have been too busy, what are you working on that’s sexy?” I told him about our podcast and the book program and he said, “That's awesome. I want to podcast but I don't want to do any work. How about I come to your show and you rebrand it around both of us and we do it together? I'll show up once a week and do an episode with you and you can do whatever you want the rest of the time.” I said, “Done.”
We rebranded it from Direct Response Marketing to SharkPreneurs. We were doing pretty good before, but having a celebrity co-host has dramatically increased our viewership because part of the deal is he has to promote every episode he's on, on his social media following, which is quite large. It’s also having his name attached. There were guests that we've had since Kevin that probably would have turned me down before had I asked. I can send an email or a social media message to about anybody on the planet, no matter how famous they are. The subject line is going to be, “Guest on Kevin Harrington, Shark Tank podcast,” and I almost always get a response.
Dustin
We both share the same mentor. One of the mentors is Dan Kennedy. He always says, “Show up with a celebrity and you're going to get attention. Your doors are going to open.”This is a strategy for everybody and it doesn't have to be Mr. Shark Tank or Mrs. Shark Tank, but it could be the local celebrity newscaster sports personality in their marketplace. Walk us through how someone or how you would advise someone to put together a deal as you put together if they went up to approach. Is there money involved? What are the talking points that need to be hit? How would you coach somebody to do this with a celebrity and an influencer in their market?
Seth
Kevin's a lousy example because Kevin will be the first. You already know this but Kevin says, “I don't write checks. The checks come to me. I don't write them the other way.” How would you approach someone in your local market? For example, I have a client who is a chiropractor and they treat a number of the Buffalo Bills professional football players. What might make sense for them is get to do a co-branded podcast with some of the football players. Of course, you get all of the Buffalo Bills fans to listen to the show and then they want to go to that chiropractor because they want to get adjusted by the same guy. If he takes care of the pros, he's good enough for them. There's a chance you might bump into Lorenzo Alexander in the lobby and that cool stuff.
How would you approach somebody in your local market? Mary Kay says people want more than money and sex, they want recognition and fame, which is why this whole thing works. Even if it's a local market, it's still some type of recognition. Let's pretend I'm starting over on not marketing famous. No one knows who I am. My pitch would be all about, “We’ll get you more exposure. You won't have to do any of the work. All you've got to do is show up once a week on a Zoom video chat. I'll write the questions for you in advance for you to ask the guest and you'll get to meet cool people. You'll get more exposure for your business and your brand. We’ll do all the promotion. It's free exposure and media and a new platform for you to grow your following on.”
Dustin
I hope a fraction of the people who are interested in this podcast conversation will act on it. You train people and you work with people on how to monetize it. We're being on influencer around here. This helps you open doors that necessarily wouldn't open. Whether you have a show with a celebrity, I want people to adopt this. They don't have to go get somebody on TV. They can do it in their marketplace. The opportunity is huge. I’ve got to ask you because I did my research. I know you interviewed Mr. Forbes. How did that go down?
Seth
Steve is awesome. I had the good fortune of being with him to celebrate his 70th birthday, which was really cool which wouldn't have come about otherwise. I got to sing to him, although he probably didn't like our singing very much. That went well. He is a celebrity guest judge on once a year version of Pitch Tank, which is a live version of Shark Tank. It's in Vegas. There are about 2,000 investors who come and companies pitch and I'm one of the preliminary judges. He's one of the celebrity judges with Kevin who picks the winner of the show, who gets the prize and the funding and all that kind of cool stuff. Steve is awesome. He was a great guest. I interviewed him the first time back before Trump got elected and the second time right after. I said, “Give Trump some advice,” which he had, which was very insightful. He replies to my emails, which is amazing. It's not some assistant who does it and he’s one of the nicest billionaires you'd ever want to meet other than Kevin, of course.
Dustin
Seth, we've known each other for quite some time. I've seen you in Direct Response Marketing just adding value to different segments of the marketplace, but I never asked you your origin story. What is your first entrepreneurial venture? Take us back.
Seth
I was bullied badly as a kid. When I was eight or nine, I was doing a research project for school. I was studying Egypt. I learned that the Egyptian’s God of death name was Seth, which freaked me out. I started on this as a cult phase. Learning about wizards in witchcraft and Wicca because I felt so powerless being beaten up all the time. I switched schools three times and it didn't matter. My parents talked to their parents. It didn't matter and it wouldn't stop. I figured if some of it was true, when I had some power, I could curse this kid to leave me alone or whatever it was. My mother comes home. I'm standing in the middle of a charcoal drawing pentagram with candles all around and she was like, “What are you doing?” I was like, “I'm trying to summon Satan.”
I figured I should start at the top not some lesser demon and she goes, “I don't care who you are summoning. Go do it in the basement on the concrete floor that I can wash. How am I supposed to get the charcoal out of the carpet?” She’s a nice Jewish mother. That's what she was worried about, the carpet. Satan didn't show up. That didn't work. My dad got me a deck of tarot cards. I went to a magic store to buy a book on how to read tarot cards. I forgot all about the tarot cards and started learning magic. I also started martial arts and eventually was able to end the bullying.
I became a magician and I'm going to fast forward. I'm going to skip college. Ultimately, I was reading a trade journal for magicians. There was an ad for a marketing course in it. I begged my parents to borrow the money from them to go buy this course. I implemented it. I became the busiest, most expensive magician in my city in 30 days. It worked well. I called Dave Dee whose course it was and said, “Would this work in my real job?” I was in my early twenties and my real job was working as a financial planner, cold calling, interrupting strangers and asking for money. He said, “Yes.” I said, “Where did you learn it?” He said the two words that changed my life. He said, “Dan Kennedy.” I started buying books, tapes, products, everything that I could get my hands on until I ultimately had the privilege to beg my wife several years later to borrow the money to go hire Dan.
He took me from the 6700th advisor in the country to the top 30 nationwide for opening new accounts in two years, which is unheard of growth and financial services. That got me written about in a bunch of industry trade journals and books pre-internet. This was all done via direct mail. My phone started ringing off that hook with advisors who wanted to know how they could do what I did. Dan told me to start a marketing company to do it for them and then I did. It started out as me and one advisor. That took off and now we've got 27 or 28 employees and serve thousands of clients around the globe. I've written seven best-selling books and I've been on CBS and NBC News and Inc. and Forbes Magazine and everywhere else.
Dustin
This concept of the client's storybook is one that you've created that I haven't heard from you. I'm learning for the first time. What is this concept and how can we benefit from this client storybook?
Seth
Your clients are your biggest advocates. They already know you. They already like you, they already trust you. Most professionals say they do business with word of mouth or referral marketing, but those referrals are organic. They come in randomly when a client feels like it. There's no regular system to generate those. Even if you take a course on how to ask for referrals the right way, most professional practices, most clients don't do it every time and they don't get great results because the client feels like they're put on the spot. What I came up with was the client storybook, which is where you interview ten of your top clients, which you could do on your podcast. You transcribe and edit those interviews into a book of stories of those clients. How they got to be successful or how they do what they do or what they do or their family's story, whatever it is and then publish that book like an anthology of whatever the topic is and then have a book launch party.
Those clients bring their family members and friends because they've never been to a book launch party before. They've never been in a book before. They've never gotten someone to ask for their autograph or get their picture taken before so it's super exciting. They tell the world and everybody comes and then all those people are like, “You're in this book and that's an awesome story, Joe,” or grandpa or whoever it is, and of course you're the one who wrote the book so you get all the love. Those clients who are not asking for twenty copies of your business card to go hand out at the rotary will definitely ask for twenty or a hundred copies of your book because they're in it. It's an ego stroke and they will give it to everybody they know. A number of those folks will pick up the phone and call you and say, “I just read this book you did with your clients. That's awesome.” They all have stories in their story of how they met you and what you've done for them. You look like a superstar and magically they all want to do business with you.
Dustin
Of the people who take and execute on this, what are some of the results that you're seeing? What are some of the stories that you're seeing people who are executing on the client storybook and doing the event?
Seth
We started a separate publishing company to handle all of the books because we're publishing five to ten a month. We have an advisor in Spokane, Washington who had his book launch party had over 100 people show up. One of the people he interviewed in the book was a travel agent and the travel agent gave away a bunch of airplane tickets as a raffle prize. He had raffles, so people were buying tickets and donated the money to charity to win prizes. He did awesomely. We had another one who is in Colorado who had over 400 people get copies of the book. He was like, “I hate it when this happens,” but he said, “I got so much business, I need to stop hiring you for a while because I got to catch up with all of this before I can do any more marketing.”
Dustin
What's been your most worthwhile investment ever?
Seth
My own education. I didn't learn any of this stuff in college. I'm entirely self-taught, learning from Dan Kennedy and you, and other folks in the industry like our friend, Russell Brunson, and John Lee Dumas and all those guys. My best investment has been my own marketing and business education. What I have found is every time our business has a geometric leap forward, it's not because I learned a cool new marketing trick. It's because I worked on myself as a person and I became a better leader, a better entrepreneur. I invested more and I grew in my own personal development and magically the business grew with me.
Dustin
Everyone thinks it's tactical when it's about getting clarity yourself. It's easy Seth to look at a guy like you and say, despite your humble stories and your tough upbringing, but still sometimes people on a podcast or from the stage or wherever on a video, they look at you and they think you're magical. I'm very curious about that investment that you'd rather not talk about, maybe a false start or a big failure. What's been something in your life that you're like, “I'm not proud of it,” but it helped you along the way?
Seth
Years ago, one of my speaking engagements, a gentleman saw me speak and want to talk about hiring me. He's the founder of one of the largest regional personal injury law firms in a multistate area. These are the guys who have commercials on 24 hours a day that you’ve heard in a car. Nine months of back and forth proposals, he wanted to become a voice in this industry. He wanted to become an information marketer and almost sell franchises in his PI firm all kinds of stuff. It was going to be a seven-figure contract. He was going to be one of our biggest non-Fortune 500 clients. The final proposal meeting, he said, “You’ve got a deal. Send me the contract on Monday.” It was a Friday, “I'll cut you a check and we'll get started.” At the very same time, my wife and I were looking for a new house because it had been a year since we had our third child and we were outgrowing our starter house.
I filled out the mortgage paperwork the Monday morning after I send him the contract. I filled it out based on what income was coming. My mortgage broker emails me back. Here's what you're preapproved for. I tell my wife, she does three cartwheels. She was like, “This is way more than I was shopping in a month ago. This is amazing. I'm so proud of you, honey.” I didn't tell her why the amount jumped. She was like, “I'm going shopping in a nicer neighborhood.” I send him the contract. It said, “Read receipt attached.” He got the email. A couple days go by and I didn't hear anything. I shoot him an email, I didn't hear anything. I made a phone call, a couple of emails, phone calls. A month had gone by and my wife found three houses, narrowed it down, wants to put an offer in and I was sweating, bullets going, “I don't have the money. I can't afford that mortgage without it. I don't know what to do.”
I canceled all my appointments one day. I went and camped out in his office and I went to the receptionist. I said, “No, I don't have an appointment, but I can't get a return email or phone call and I was supposed to get an email and the first six-figure payment a month ago. I took the day off. I got a book. I'm going to sit here all day until I get two seconds with this guy because he's not returning my emails or my phone calls.” She gets all mad. She stomps off into the back and then comes back five minutes later, “I'm sorry. He changed his mind. He's not going to do it.” I sat in my car, screamed, swore, pound the steering wheel. I couldn't go back to work. My wife met me at home with a bottle of Jack Daniel’s. She didn't know why I was so mad. I was like, “Drop the kids at your parents. Go get me a bottle, meet me at home. I'll explain later. Bad day.” I had to tell her, “Honey, you can't buy any of those houses because I can't afford it anymore. It was based on that six-figure check that he flaked out on. You have to go back to our normal price range.” She was heroically understanding and very nice about it, but I could tell she was disappointed.
The worst part is not only had we mentally spent the money on that new house, but I had hired new employees because I'm going to need them to fulfill all the work. We were starting work already Monday based on his saying yes and I then didn't have the work for them and had to figure out what are they going to do now? How am I going to make payroll for these people now that I don't have this contract? How am I going to replace all of that revenue? We were also supposed to move into his office building because he had space and our lease was up. We were going to move in and I now had to find new space in a very short period of time. There were some hard lessons there.
Dustin
I'm very curious, how did you dig yourself out? What was the mindset? How did you recover from this crazy situation?
Seth
I drank a lot of the Jack that day, passed out and then woke up the next morning with the hangover going. That didn't help at all, “I’ve got to go work. I’ve got to go make this up.” We found a new space, a massive amount of marketing to generate revenue. In those 30 days, we didn't generate that enough to totally replace him but we had some employees who were heroically understanding and said, “No problem, I'll wait. Pay me next month. I'm okay, I'll be all right for a month.” That bought us 60 days. We did enough marketing to be able to make payroll, to bring in enough new clients to make payroll. I had stopped marketing for a couple of months because this guy was coming on board. We couldn't handle anybody else because he was going to be a large percentage of our business. We went back to everybody that we had put off and said, “We can take you now.” We did a ton of marketing, brought in enough revenue to get by and then grew from there.
Dustin
I'm curious to know when you're winning and you want to splurge on yourself, what do you invest in? What do you spend on?
Seth
My own business and marketing education, I'm a voracious reader. I read a couple of books a week, so I'm always buying books. For an example of fun, I'm still a magician. Even though I don't perform a lot anymore, I will still buy magic tricks even though I know no one may ever see them but me, but I buy it because it's cool and I want to do it. That's probably my guilty pleasure.
Dustin
Are you giving magic to your kids? Are you passing that down?
Seth
I do shows for all of their school classes because they're young. I am working on it. They go through phases. There was a phase when everybody wanted to learn cool stuff. They're not in that phase at the moment. Hopefully, they will get back into it.
Dustin
Seth, what are your routines for success? Do you have any special habits or rituals you do?
Seth
I'm a martial artist so that certainly helps. It's a great stress reliever and it may help save your life one day. I'm a big believer in EFT like tapping affirmations, incantations, morning routines. I am a student of The Perfect Day Formula from Craig Ballantyne and the Five-Minute Morning Mail or go from hell. The 15 Minutes of Fulfillment, Hour of Power from Tony Robbins. I've got a hodgepodge.
Dustin
I picked up a Craig stuff this year, The Perfect Day Formula. I like it. We're looking to have him on the show. When you experience overwhelm or maybe you feel like you're drifting a little bit unfocused, what do you do to get yourself back on track?
Seth
I will go back and read some of my favorite books that will inspire me, that are stories of people who had it worse than however I think I did and get me out of it and pull my head out of wherever it’s stuck. I will give myself a certain amount of time to have the pity party and wallow in that negative emotion and then say, “After that five minutes or whatever, I've got to do something positive, move myself forward and paint a picture of a compelling future because whatever you focus on is what happens.” If I stay negative, I'll just make it worse. The only way out is to focus on something that excites you. On the other side of your breakdowns are your breakthroughs.
Dustin
For folks who want to continue the conversation and follow up with you and see what you're up to in the world, how can they do that?
Seth
Our main website is MarketDominationLLC.com. Kevin and I are giving away a professional podcast studio for anyone who wants to enter and win and have a professional studio equipment that's at PodcastStudioContest.com.
Dustin
If you were motivating somebody or giving them words of advice and wisdom to get them into action, maybe they've been thinking about becoming an entrepreneur, starting that business or getting into that investment, what would you say to them?
Seth
There is no greater laboratory to grow yourself as a person than trying to grow a business.
Dustin
Seth, I truly appreciate you being on the show. Thanks.
Seth
Thanks for having me.

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