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The Purchasing Power Of Women with Susan McVea

In this episode, we're getting to know Susan McVea in the area of how to sell and how to communicate with women. She is a B2B sales and operation expert, who has personally sold $40 million and her teams have sold over $600 million. We're talking about how to communicate more effectively.

In this specific show, you're going to hear Susan's near-death experience. You're also going to come to understand that women have an amazing influence on the purchasing power of the United States and around the world on all different products and services, not just B2B but B2C.

You're going to discover the process, the methodology and the mindset of how do you communicate to women to get them to take action and to get them invested in your product and service? If you're part of the WealthFit Nation and especially my entrepreneurs and small business owners out there, you're going to especially want to hear what Susan has to say.

Dustin
Susan, to the outside world, life is great. You’re making good money, you’ve got that corner office, even the little white picket fence. Secretly you’ve been hiding chronic pain until one day it boils up and you find yourself at the moment where you think you’re having a heart attack. Susan, how did you get to this point?
Susan
I pondered and wondered what happened at that moment too. I should have seen the signs. There have been breadcrumb clues along the way but as so often can happen when we’re running after the next thing. I never stopped to realize the impact of all of these little things that were happening in my life. I had three car accidents before I was 33. I had two small kids as well. I had been treating my body like a machine, working in corporate, having a very successful career. Yet at the same time, with the birth of my daughter, I didn’t realize there was something missing. I just thought I needed to chase after another job. I needed to get another promotion. I needed to get another title, I needed to get a bigger team, all of the things that we so often can think about. When I had that last and final car accident that left me with chronic pain, I ignored it. I kept going. It took me having an emotional breakdown. I was a victim of my own success and I had been working so hard at achieving all of these things and helping so many people in the organization: my client, my staff, my colleagues, everyone except for me.
When I started crying at stop signs in the underground parking lot of my business and not being able to face my colleagues, my boss, the CEOs that I was about to step in to a meeting with, I realized that something was drastically wrong. I thought I was having a heart attack. My resting heart rate was 103. I couldn’t stop my hands from shaking. The thoughts were raising. The crying wouldn’t stop. I found myself in front of my doctor, she had run all the tests and fortunately, there was nothing wrong with me. There was nothing else physically wrong with me aside from what we had already been working through with the chronic pain that developed into a chronic illness. She said five words to me that completely changed my life, “You can’t return to work.” It devastated me because my whole identity, everything that I worked so hard for including that corner office overlooking the ocean was essentially wiped away in a span of 30 seconds. I didn’t know it at the time but that breakdown was actually a breakthrough to what I was meant to actually do. It gave me the biggest gift and has been one of the biggest blessings aside from my kids and my husband in my life, to allow me to do the things I actually meant to do.
Dustin
Susan, oftentimes when you get words like that or when something is taken away from you, there’s this regret like, “I wish I had done more.” In this case, it’s a little bit different. I’m curious, what went through your head initially when the doctor said those five words, “You can’t return to work?” I know what the hustle is like. What went through your head at first initially?
Susan
First, it was a multitude of emotions. I had guilt, shame and, “She can’t be serious. Is this really happening to me?”When I first had the accident, I had only taken six days off of work. My car took six weeks to come back from the autobody shop. I thought, “Maybe if I had done a better job then, I wouldn’t be in this predicament right now.” Then I thought, “There’s no use crying over a spilled milk. Let’s get on with this, Susan.” The next thought instantly was, “I’ll just take six weeks off now. This will just be a mini-vacation. I’ll come back refreshed, recharged and we’ll just keep going.” Then six weeks turned into six months and then it just kept going. Everyday I’d wake up and think, “Maybe tomorrow I’ll return to work.” Eventually I realized, “No, I need to create a new normal because going back to what was is not in the cards for me. I need to figure out how I can turn lemonades out of lemons and really make sure that I’m taking back control of my life.”
Dustin
There are so many places I want to take this. I want to get in to selling to women. I think it’s going to be incredibly powerful. I want you to bridge the gap for us. You get this message, six weeks turned into six months. You’re at home and you say that this breakdown ends up being your breakthrough. Get us now to the point where you’re at in life. How do you go from being there six months not knowing what you’re going to do to now doing what you do?
Susan
It was a tough journey. It was probably a good nine to fourteen months of just literally doing nothing. I had to figure out how do I completely pivot my life when I have imagined my life retiring from corporate? I fell into my corporate job as not a natural-born sales person, but I had quickly escalated because I was really good at teaching. Because selling was hard for me, it became easy for me to teach others because I really had to learn it, I had to understand it. When I was off work and just finding myself, I thought, “This is my midlife crisis. This isn’t so fancy. Where is the Corvette and the beautiful women?”Instead, I was spending time with myself and it was the biggest gift but it allowed me to sit down and go, “What am I actually good at? What do I want to do? What’s the impact that I want to make in the world? How can I use the gifts that I’ve had the opportunity to learn as well as the things that are inherently easy for me that God has given to me, that I can now give to the world?”
It started in small measures. It started with me trying to figure out, “How can I connect with people?” Though I am introverted, I was really lonely being at home, being completely isolated. With the car accident, I didn’t really leave my house unless I was going to appointments. As I started to dig in to how I can serve other individuals especially business owners that didn’t have the ability to work for a huge corporate engine that I had come from, the background that I had worked for. The company was 80,000 worldwide employees. It’s massive. I thought, “How do I distill this and help people that are trying to build businesses that are impact-driven, that are taking their gifts, their expertise but they’re really struggling to sell?” Initially, I didn’t want to focus on sales. I actually coined myself as a success coach because I wanted everybody to be successful. I realized that’s not helping anyone. I honed in on I’m good at teaching sales. Although I wasn’t naturally-born with that gift, now having practiced it and mastered it for well-over twenty years in my business or in corporate, those were skills that were transferrable into a business that I could deliver in a way that still helped me and my priorities, which was health and my family.
Dustin
Susan, in the corporate world, what were you selling?
Susan
My background in corporate was financial services: finance, financial services. I was in retail banking, so it was bank accounts all the way up to a million-dollar plus mortgages, investment portfolios and everything in between. Anything that you can think of finance-wise that you would go to a bank or credit union for, that’s what I was selling. That’s what my teams were selling. We partnered with a lot of small business owners. They were clients, they were partners, they were referral opportunities for us. My parents were small business owners. I utilized a lot of that entrepreneurial background that I didn’t realize was a thing at the time to leverage my success in a corporate environment.
Dustin
In the corporate world when you were there, did you notice that there were maybe outdated sales strategies or you were left to figure out how to talk to women? Did you recognize that something was off while you were at corporate?
Susan
Not so much in corporate. I realized that in a male-dominated field like finance, there weren’t a lot of female leaders, there weren’t a lot of female sales people. The organization that I worked for did a phenomenal job of diversity in female representation, so I feel really blessed that happened to me through my career because I’ve heard other horror stories that it isn’t always the case. I started to notice that there were differences in how men and women communicate. As I always escalated, I became a sales leader and I needed to be able to teach my sales teams how to deliver the same products and services to similar clients, but everybody was a bit different. When I dissected what the differences were, I started to notice personalities for sure but then also that there were gender differences in terms of how women feel about selling, how women feel about receiving the actual purchasing decision and on the buying. How individuals need to adjust the process, the framework in order to increase the level of success that we have especially if we are having a female client across a table from us.
Dustin
If you've prepared mentally and let's say you're selling to a male, and then you show up in the board room or you show up in the purchasing department or wherever it's going to take place the presentation. What pivots need to be made from that style of presentation now to one that caters to women?
Susan
Immediately women need to have more of a sense of inclusion. You can't sell to them or at them. They need to be part of the buying process. It's really more of a collaborative effort. Instead of coming just with your presentation, you need to ask them for their input as you're presenting, which can feel a little bit different because you’re still positioning yourself as the expert, but you need to draw out things that would prevent a woman from purchasing from you and she's going to voice those concerns if you actually allow her to do that as you go along in the presentation. Typically with men, they're not as apt to require that. They tend to just want like, “Here's the problem. If you speak my language and I know that you get what I need, then just give me the solution,” and they don't meander as much. They don't look at the different options.
Even if a woman's not terribly detail oriented, she will often go into all of these tangents and you might be thinking, “What is going on here? Does this mean that she doesn't want to buy from me?” No. In fact, it actually could mean that she's extremely interested. If you start to shut down the opportunity for her to keep asking these questions and engaging with you through the process, you actually are going to have more objections that come up, and you are potentially shooting yourself in the foot because you don't understand why she's asking these, where that is stemming from. You're looking at it as make work where really it's part of the work.
Dustin
You were so gracious enough to allow us to accommodate when my voice was at its peak. You shared the story with me of being in a room where there was a male presenting from the stage, it was predominantly female. This was a new environment I think for this individual and they messed it all up. Can you tell that story here?
Susan
When I'm going to events, I like to observe as a participant but also I put my salesperson hat on and so that's what ended up happening here. He was a very well-known speaker, expert in his own right, does extremely well and I know that he has had very good sale success in more coed environments where there's a more even mix between men and women. In this particular event, it was 95% female-based, a lot of women in the audience, which isn't his typical audience member in terms of that scale. As he was doing his usual presentation, I could see it wasn't resonating with the audience. In fact, the lady beside me and said, “I don't like this guy. He's very salesy.” There is a palpable energy in the room for how they were reacting. He knew it, but he didn't know how to fix it. In fact his body language, I can picture him right now, he’s pleading with people. It was very meta because he was trying to teach them about head trash, about sales and selling and the belief system that is preventing them from making these sales. Yet, there was this huge resistance from the audience. He was pleading with them, “This is exactly what you need because this is how you're feeling right now,” and he could feel it, but he couldn't engage with them in the way that they wanted to be engaged with so that they could be brought along.
There's an instant wall there that really could have been eliminated if he had implemented a couple of things in his presentation to bring the audience along with him. Some subtle shifts in the language and how he was positioning himself. Then the pace of how he was speaking so that people would have an opportunity to really think about what he was presenting to them. As a result, he didn't get very many sales. I know based on his track record, that would have been very disappointing to him because he's used to converting quite a substantial portion of that room.
Dustin
I remember having this thought in my head about the makeup of the audience. Obviously, 95% male. I think you made a comment, Susan, which was had that been 50/50,the results obviously might have been different. Does the makeup of the audience change when it’s 50/50 or maybe predominantly male? Does anything change for the women? Do they look to men for a different buying signal? How does that dynamic change, if it does?
Susan
It does. The number one question that women will often think whether consciously, a lot of times it’s a subconscious, is what will people think?“When I buy this thing, what will people think of me?” That's why women will go onto social media and ask for referrals, they will look at what people are recommending. In a room where there are more males that are responding positively to the presentation, if those people get up and purchase and they are well-regarded individuals within that female scope of influence, their community, they will be more likely to purchase because that's how women buy. In that room, if more women had gotten up to purchase, other women would have gotten up to purchase. It's like the blind leading the blind a little bit. If you're able to really make sure that you're tapping into the buyer behavior and the buyer dynamics of the audience that you have, absolutely this can be shifted because of the way that women interact with others, both men and women.
Dustin
My mind is jumping around a little bit thinking of all the different scenarios. If it were a female speaker up there with a 50/50 approach or even predominantly male. What does the woman up there that's selling need to take into account when addressing that audience?
Susan
I love that you've picked out a female speaker because automatically our instinct is she's a woman, she's automatically going to do better. That's not always the case because traditionally females are still taught by mostly male sales trainers. We're taught a very male-dominated approach of how to sell. As a result, if it doesn't land, then we have to work on our own to figure out through trial and error why it doesn't work out. For a female speaker, usually what I find is that they will either do one of two things. They will either cater too much to the female audience. As such they will lose some of the male interest in the group because men are more of what I call a straight-line approach. It's point A to point B. If I know I have the problem and you've articulated that, then I want you to get me to point B as quickly as possible or I'm going to lose interest.
The saving grace here is always stories. If you can wrap people into stories, even though you might take a little bit longer, you're going to get them to the final destination. For women, given that we like to be brought along the process, we want to understand what's going on sometimes behind the scenes, how this involves us, what are the different aspects that might be involved. We go in more of a zigzag and our actual brain growth patterns have it substantiates because men have more gray matter and women have more white matter, which is the connections, the part of our brains that create connections between seemingly unlike things. Our brains naturally want to do that all the time, which is why women, how I like to describe it, purchase more in a zigzag pattern.
Dustin
A lot of sales trainers, they have a methodology or process. I agree with you, I think most of them have been predominantly male, so I'm curious as to what your philosophy or your methodology of the sales process looks like on a general.
Susan
The framework for sales for me is very similar to me to another salesperson. It comes down to making sure you're talking to the right people, qualifying, having a process while you're actually having the conversation to move them through that buying, making a decision and then doing the close and follow up as required and obviously, there is objection handling in the middle of that. For me, it really comes down to the quality of questions such that at every stage of the process, especially when you are having a conversation with one of your potential customers, that you are essentially continuing to prequalify them not only for yourself but ultimately for them. They are also being brought along. It is a combination of that straight line as well as that zigzag approach because it incorporates being able to involve the female buyer in particular to make sure that they're still onsite and to address any questions or potential obstacles that might come up or objections that might come up down the road. Also making sure that you don't lose a more direct purchaser, whether that's male or female.
Dustin
Is this process different at all if we're selling smaller ticket things versus bigger things or sophisticated things? Does it change?
Susan
It does change somewhat. It's going to depend on your particular client base, what the dollar amount looks like. I would say the amount of time that you spend is relative to the value and the purchase price of the individual item. If somebody is going to take a lot of brain power for a $500 purchase because that's still a big ticket for them, then you need to account for that in your sales process however you're selling to them. Definitely when you're having an actual conversation with individuals, for me those tend to be reserved more for higher ticket or higher touch types of services and products where there needs to be a bit more explanation. Your sales process whether you're using a sales page or an actual sales conversation or a sales presentation needs to be longer. It needs to be more robust. It needs to walk people through and allow them time to ponder and also make the connections that you're asking them to make.
Dustin
Part of the WealthFit Nation comprises of investors, a lot of business owners and entrepreneurs. I'm very curious as to what some mistakes of business owners or even sales people make when they sell to women?
Susan
There are three biggest mistakes that I typically find even in chatting with people and what they realized through trial and error. Number one is you are taking a male-oriented process. First, you don't even sometimes realize that it is focused on a male-oriented way of buying and selling. It doesn't necessarily translate to a female-based audience, especially if you're trying to change the surface elements. What I mean by that is often we think, "I'll use the same process, but I'll make the branding more feminine. I'll change the colors. Attract the female audience by using pink.”I’ll be totally honest, this is something that I did. I forgot all of this stuff that I was doing in corporate. When I first started, I thought, "I love pink. I'm going to sell to women. I'm going to use pink." I realized I did the same thing that so many people have naturally gravitated towards is I need to account for how females like to buy and make a change in the process itself.
Number two is assuming that females know how to sell to other females. That's not necessarily the case because we're often being taught by males who don't necessarily speak a female-oriented language or don't even realize that there are these subtle differences. Having said that, there are definitely people who have realized this and incorporate this into their process. If you find somebody like that, fabulous, because you're already steps ahead of where you want to be. If you're growing your business and you're thinking, "I have females in my audience, I have female clients and I want to be able to interact with them at a deeper, more meaningful level." By hiring a female salesperson or a female sales manager, you feel like that's going to be the thing that will help you. I'm going to caution you and say that's not necessarily the case. You need to make sure that they understand the mechanics behind how to sell to women in a way that serves those buyers.
The last piece is oftentimes we underestimate the buying power of women or we don't realize behind every good man, there's a woman usually making a buying decision. What I often hear from the market is people saying, "The woman has to go and check with a business partner or their spouse or they don't invest at the same level, so they're not willing to spend the same amounts of money." I know that is not the case at all. Both from my background in corporate as well as now in my own business and working with other clients that do have women that are spending multiple five figures, six figures with relative ease. Don't underestimate the fact that if you have men in the room as well as women, often our inclination can be, "I'm going to talk to the guys, they are the key decision makers." You may be completely alienating the people who are ultimately behind that critical decision, which very well could be the woman to your left instead of the guy right in front of you.
Dustin
There's a statistic out there that say women, if they aren't the decision maker, they definitely influenced a decision maker. That stat is a majority. It's not 40% but it's more 60% or higher. Are you finding that to be true?
Susan
Yeah, absolutely. I'll share a story. Hopefully, this might help somebody. We had our furnace replaced. My husband was here because I was working. I said, "I don't want to deal with the guy who's coming in to do this. Can you please make sure that you're available because I'm busy that day?" He had come in, arranged all of this. The gentleman, the business owner, who came in to provide this home service for us talked to my husband and only my husband, even though I was home not realizing that I am the key decision maker. Obviously, it's a family purchase, we decide together. I very much influence what is happening in this house with the things that we're installing, whether or not they would be able to come back in. He did his business a disservice by not speaking to me or involving me in the process. I thought it was very interesting because the stat might be up as high as about 76%. 76% of all the decisions that are being made for everything going on that we ever buy, there's probably a woman behind it. Don't miss out on that opportunity just because you're assuming that the person who's ultimately paying you is the only one part of that decision-making process.
Dustin
Your clientele, is it more men coming to you figuring out how to sell to women? Is it women trying to figure out how to sell to men? I'm very curious as to the makeup of your audience or your clientele
Susan
When I first started my business, it was almost 99% female-based because they were struggling to sell in general. They were being taught by men very heavy-headed strategies and techniques that did not sit well even though they had a very high level of expertise behind them. That has been my traditional audience. It's shifted and it's about 75/25 with women to men. More men are realizing that they need more diversity in their workplace. They also need to be able to make sure that if they are speaking to both men and women, that they're accounting for that. Making sure that they are maximizing the opportunities that their business could take hold of. I'm seeing a lot more interest, especially as I've become more vocal in this particular topic, that there's not a lot of representation for female sales leadership in the market. That's where a lot of business owners have immense opportunity, especially as we continue to have this show up more and more in the market.
Dustin
In working with either scenario of the clients that you described, what do you help them with? What are some of the big things that you point out to people and work with them onto getting them to communicate at a higher level?
Susan
For me, the critical piece is making sure that there is an actual sales process that is built for success. By that I mean, in businesses oftentimes what ends up happening is you're only as successful as your best salesperson. If you lose that critical person, you're seeing business literally walk out the door because there's a lag time behind how quickly you can replicate some of that genius that they had inherent to them within the context of your business. The other piece is making sure that if you're wanting to tap into business opportunities where there is a female buying presence that you have that incorporated within the context of your company culture.
The personalities of the individuals that are having to sell actively with those clients and that there is congruency between how a customer comes in at every stage of the process. Not as sales in isolation but ultimately as part of your service delivery because there's a disjoint between how your staff sells for the sake of selling at all costs. Then being able to transfer that into the actual service delivery piece, whatever that looks like, whether it's a product, whether it's a high touch service consulting. If there is a disconnect because we're not teaching our sales people properly and we're not supporting them in the best way possible, then you don't get repeat clients. You don't get referrals. You don't see sustainable business growth and you’re operating at much higher costs than you absolutely need to. For me, it's been making sure that your process is a down path. That you have the right people in the roles, and that you have a way to be able to create continuity for your business, not only for your customers but also for your team.
Dustin
What are the big takeaways in terms of building your team now? You become successful in selling to women or selling in general. It's about building a team, which you have a great deal of experience with corporate and working with so many different entrepreneurs. What are some of the key markers or the key things to consider when replicating yourself and building a team?
Susan
The first thing is looking at your company culture, your company values and your company vision. I always say you can always hire for attitude and train for skills. For me, it comes down to your attitude and your behaviors, but also the core values. Because where there is misalignment between what an employee believes in or values and what you as a company, values or beliefs in, they will choose themselves. It's not because they're bad people. It's because that's who they are. It's important that you choose the right folks for the right role at the right time.
As your business grows, you also don't think about people in isolation because it only takes one bad apple to spoil the whole bunch. It's critical that you look at how those strengths and weaknesses play off of one another especially in an environment where perhaps you are going to be working closely together, perhaps not in a remote environment where there's not as much interaction. That is going to be even more critical that you take into account different work styles, personality styles and ensuring that there's a fit within each of your team members as well as a fit with how you deliver with your clients.
Dustin
What's been your most worthwhile investment?
Susan
My most worthwhile investment has always been mentoring. I've had the privilege of having quite a number of mentors. Back in corporate, it was built into our system. When I was on my own, I realized I need that. It's something that I missed having that dedicated support. Mentoring has always been my most worthwhile investment.
Dustin
We find fear and self-doubt often keep people from achieving their goals. Was it a mentor that helps you do that or what are your strategies for overcoming that fear and that self-doubt?
Susan
The fear that I had all by myself at home prior to even building my business was the biggest foundation piece to removing a lot of that fear and self-doubt. Every fear, every negative emotion or a thought or a belief that I'd ever carried forward in my life, they came out screaming from the walls during those periods when it was literally just myself. I went to therapy. I recommend it to everybody. It's important that you have the help and support of key individuals and experts that can help you get out of your own way. I am faith-based, so I do a lot of prayer and meditation. Spending time listening to what God has for me that has been instrumental. Being able to reach out to experts who specifically do this skill in their business in order to help propel me forward. Making sure that I have a strong support system of individuals who know who I am, what I want to do and can give me that kick in the pants when I am going around in circles instead of moving forward.
Dustin
I'm curious as to know any rituals or routines maybe that you've developed around that or in general, anything that you do on a ritualistic basis to get you ready for the day or to help you succeed. Anything like that?
Susan
I have a very strict routine. I do mindset with visualizations and affirmations. I firmly believe that what you speak into becomes what your life turns into. That is super important to me, spending time in prayer. I do meditation every day. It's part of my health routine. It helps me with managing my chronic pain, but the added side effect is that it helped me get a lot of clarity and a lot of wonderful ideas come to me, inspired through my meditation time. "I only focus on my three rocks," so that's an old Stephen Covey throwback from corporate days. My7 Habits of Highly Effective People. I leverage my team and making sure that I delegate as much as I possibly can so that I can continue to do the work that only I can do. Those are the main things that I focus on. I need movement. If I ever get stuck in a funk, I go outside. I try and spend time in nature. I love being near the water. Thankfully, I live someplace where the water is five minutes away. I try to be outside for a minimum of 30 minutes a day.
Dustin
Where do you live?
Susan
I'm in Vancouver. I'm a Canadian, raised and born.
Dustin
What have you become better at saying no to?
Susan
I have become better at saying no to just about everything because although I thought I was good at it, I realized, no, I'm terrible at saying no. I was putting everybody first and sacrificing my own self. I realized when I say no, I get to say yes to something else. I say no to anything that I don't love. I say no to things that don't give me complete and utter joy. I say no to things that take me away from my family. I say no to things that deplete my energy and affect my health negatively. It allows me the space to say yes to the priorities of my life, which include quality family time. It includes my own self development and self-care. It includes being able to be at peace and spend time with myself and being able to hear what God has laid out for me. All of that combined has been through the gift of saying no.
Dustin
When life is great, and you want to reward yourself, what is your guilty spending splurge
Susan
It's books, journals and pens. I am an office supply junkie. I don't know if anybody else can relate, but you give me pens and pencils, crayons. I'm a crafter at heart so I love like pretty papers and different colored pens. I'm so simple. I also love to read. I'm a lifelong learner. I take a ton of books out of the library. We've moved about five times between my husband and myself since we've been together. Moving a library of books is a lot. Investing in books is a big thing for me. As much as I love books, I try to use my library as much as possible. When I have the opportunity to splurge on a book, it's a big deal.
Dustin
I'm a big fan of books. What are some books that are on the top of that list that you've read that you recommend?
Susan
There have been a lot. I'm a quick reader. If I get going, I can read a book to three books a week, that's why it is my guilty pleasure. For books around self-development in general, I would say Shonda Rhimes' book was amazing and funny. On the flip side, I'm reading one from James Altucher, which is The Power of No. I love that one as well. Mel Robbins, The 5 Second Rule. That one is really quick and easy, but it helps people create some momentum and move them forward. If you're struggling to figure out your purpose because that's where I was when I had that breakdown, The Power of Purpose, by Richard Leider, that was wonderful as well.
In terms of sales, I go back to tried and true. It's been quite eye-opening for me as I've tried to figure out where are the female sales mentors for me now navigating in this new area of my life. I'll be honest, I haven't seen a ton. I'm starting to now find a little bit more. I haven't had an opportunity to read their books. I'm going to say I don't have any female sales masters to mention in terms of my booklist, but I still love Jeffrey Gitomer, Red Book of Selling for quick and dirty like here are some things. You're going to have to adapt them if you're using a female audience. Brian Tracy I would say is probably the closest male role model that I have found where a lot of his strategies do translate nicely to both a male or a female audience.
Dustin
Susan, thank you for dropping the wisdom, sharing resources and rituals. I truly appreciate you telling your story and opening up about the panic attacks. Obviously sharing your wisdom on how do we communicate better at the end of the day whether it's male or female? How do we have more empowering communication? For folks who want to continue the conversation and keep tabs on what you are up to and creating in the world, where can folks find you?
Susan
You can find me on my website,SusanMcVea.com. My main social media platform is on Facebook. You can find me across all social media @SusanMcVea. I would love to hear from you. Feel free to send me a message or email me. I respond to all of my messages and all of my emails personally. My team does not take that on because relationships have been such an important way for me to build my business. I love finding out about how I can help serve more and more people.
Dustin
Susan, thanks for joining us on the Get WealthFit show. I appreciate having you on. Thanks again.
Susan
You're welcome. Thanks so much.

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How To Use Business & Personal Credit To Launch Your Startup

Gerri Detweiler

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Profitable Podcasting

Have you ever wanted to start your own podcast? Chris and Katie Krimitsos, founders of Podfest Multimedia Expo and Biz Women Rock (respectively) show you how to jumpstart your podcast and start making money.

Profitable Podcasting

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Feeling Invincible, Marketing Martha Stewart & Dropping 76 Pounds!

Once Sayan Sarkar finally quit his full-time job, his side hustle business took off and generated 10x the amount of money he was making at his office job. He shares tips and tricks to how he was able to make this happen.

Feeling Invincible, Marketing Martha Stewart & Dropping 76 Pounds!

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Born To Sell, Tripling Revenue & the Silver Tsunami

Are you investing in home care marketing? In this episode, The Hurricane explains why this industry is worth your hard-earned money.

Born To Sell, Tripling Revenue & the Silver Tsunami

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Conquering Cancer, Making Movies & Selling Businesses

This Cancerpreneur didn’t let the bad news of illness get in the way of his entrepreneurial spirit and positive mindset.

Conquering Cancer, Making Movies & Selling Businesses

Free PR

Free PR

The Hustler's Guide To Capturing Media Attention & Getting Eyeballs on Your Brand

Nicole Dunn

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How To Build Your Business Credit Score—To Get Business Loans & Low Interest Rates

Learn how to build your business credit score so you can get access to business loans with low interest rates.

How To Build Your Business Credit Score—To Get Business Loans & Low Interest Rates

Michelle Black

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Do You Have What It Takes To Be An Entrepreneur?

In her new book “Women with Money,” Jean Chatzky gives us the top 5 traits of successful entrepreneurs. [Excerpt]

Do You Have What It Takes To Be An Entrepreneur?

Jean Chatzky

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Idea To Income

Idea To Income

How To Start a Company and Turn Your Entrepreneurial Dreams into Reality

Didi Wong

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Advanced Amazon Sales Strategies

Advanced Amazon Sales Strategies

How To Get More Traffic, Optimize Your Listing, & Grow From a Simple Product Into a Successful Brand

Jason Boyce

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Start Your Own Amazon Store

Start Your Own Amazon Store

How To Launch Your First Product on Amazon.com

Jason Boyce

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Moneyball, Pitching 100 M.P.H. & Escaping The Canadian Government

Jill and Ron Wolforth are helping kids achieve their dreams by developing their skills with America's favorite pastime. However, their journey hasn't always been easy. Learn how they've grown from being uncomfortable.

Moneyball, Pitching 100 M.P.H. & Escaping The Canadian Government

Start Your Own AirBnb Business

Start Your Own AirBnb Business

How To Claim Your Share of the Fast-Growing Short-Term Rental Market

Mark Kappelman & Steven Eshkenazi

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Start Your Own Online Education Business

Start Your Own Online Education Business

How to Become an Edu-preneur And Get Paid for Teaching What You Know

Robert Skrob

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An Unusual Way To Wealth

WealthFit Chief Wealth Evangelist Dustin Mathews on his entrepreneurship journey. From rastafarianism to quitting his own company.

An Unusual Way To Wealth

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How to Get Free Money from the Government to Fund Your Startup

Who doesn't want cash from their favorite Uncle Sam? Here's how you can find grants and fund your business with free government money.

How to Get Free Money from the Government to Fund Your Startup

Ian Chandler

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How Much Do You REALLY Need to Start a Business? The Answer is Less Than You Think.

Think starting a business takes TONS of money? It doesn’t have to. Here’s how you can build your empire without breaking the bank.

How Much Do You REALLY Need to Start a Business? The Answer is Less Than You Think.

Jon Westenberg

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Bootstrap Your Startup & Kickstart Your Success

Launching a startup without investors may seem like a one-way ticket to failure—but it’s one of the best ways to kickstart your business.

Bootstrap Your Startup & Kickstart Your Success

Ian Chandler

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Crowdfunding With Kickstarter

Bootstrapping a featured film. Tony Nardolillo explains how he funded his movie using Kickstarter—and made it into 600 theaters.

Crowdfunding With Kickstarter

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Selling To Women

Selling to women—the too often overlooked market opportunity. Susan McVea on the process, methodology, and mindset of selling to women.

Selling To Women

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How to Find the Co-Founder Your Business Needs

Choosing the right cofounder can make or break your business. Find a cofounder that compliments your skill set and delivers skills that you lack.

How to Find the Co-Founder Your Business Needs

Nathan Wade

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Learn 5 Key Ways to Onboard Employees

Your employees are your most valuable asset. Protect your investment in them with an effective and efficient onboarding process.

Learn 5 Key Ways to Onboard Employees

Nathan Wade

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How to Lead Employees to Greatness: Your (Hormonal) Strategy for Success

Consider and stimulate (the right) hormones for your team. Embrace leadership tactics that foster healthy hormonal teams.

How to Lead Employees to Greatness: Your (Hormonal) Strategy for Success

Jill Huettich

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