money

How To Get Help With Medical Debt: 6 Organizations That Will Pay Your Medical Bills

Lance Cothern

WealthFit Contributor

When you’re facing a medical emergency, you’re focused on getting better—the last thing on your mind is how you’re going to pay for it.

When your medical issue is taken care of, the bills start to come. Reality then sets in.

If the bill is more than your emergency fund and you don’t have a surplus of cash on hand, it turns into medical debt—72 million people in America have this form of debt.

Racking up medical debt can happen in more ways and faster than you’d imagine. What can happen in a few seconds—a fall, a car accident, a sudden pain—can take years to repay.

Thankfully, there are organizations that help pay medical bills if you’ve fallen into this challenging situation.

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Ways People Fall Into Medical Debt

If you feel like you're drowning in debt . . . you need a different game plan. You need to learn a system to pay off debt that can be implemented TODAY.

Medical debt is just one of many ways American's get trapped everyday.

Medical debt doesn’t only come from huge hospital bills—you can end up racking up medical debt in quite a few ways.

No Health Insurance

One of the quickest ways to rack up medical debt is to have no health insurance, which covers you in the event of a medical need.

Although there is no longer a federal penalty for not having insurance, you run the risk of being on the hook for any sudden or planned medical needs, which can be hundreds of thousands of dollars. After all, accidents aren’t planned.

Even though many providers offer self-pay discounts, which can reduce the outrageous initial price tag of medical bills but may still leave you with a hefty bill you can’t afford to pay, there are little to no pros when weighing whether or not you should have health insurance.

Saving money each month by not paying for health insurance won’t equate to more than the thousands of dollars that health emergencies can cost.

Emergency Room Visits

Emergency room visits often result in steep medical bills. After you are discharged, the hospital will bill you for medicine, procedures and their services. Then, doctors often bill for their expertise separate from the hospital.

If you’re visiting for a true emergency, lab tests or other procedures may have to be done. These add even more costs.

It’s not uncommon to leave the emergency room and then get hit with many bills in the thousands of dollars.

If your medical situation isn’t critical, visit a general doctor or an urgent clinic. Doing so may take more time before you can see a doctor, but both of these options will be far cheaper in the long run.

Hospitalization

If you end up getting admitted to the hospital for any reason, your bill will skyrocket.

Everything is vastly more expensive in the hospital—a study found these alarming costs:

  • Tylenol billed as $15 per individual pill (a supply of 50 tablets costs $13)
  • a medicine cup billed as $10 (medicine cups can be bought for under $5.00)
  • a bag to hold your personal items—like a grocery bag— cost upwards of $8 (plastic bags can be purchased for 2-5 cents)

Hospitals charge daily rates for use of a room, too. These rates blow almost any nightly hotel rate out of the water. Then, add in costs for supplies, medications, lab work, and doctor consultations—you’re already in the tens of thousands of dollars, if not more.

It’s easy to see how you could end up in medical debt quickly.

Organizations That Help Pay Medical Bills

If you’ve fallen into medical debt, you may need help digging your way out. Consider the following organizations that help pay medical bills.

1. Healthcare Providers Such as Your Hospital

Healthcare providers won’t pay your medical bills for you, but they do have the power to reduce or completely drop them.

If you’re having trouble paying your medical bills, call your healthcare provider. Be straightforward. Ask if they can reduce the bill or completely get rid of the bill.

If that doesn’t work, explain your financial situation. Then, ask if they have a department you could speak with that could help. Since some medical providers are non-profits, these providers may be able to help you with your medical debt in certain situations.

One example of this is National Jewish Healthcare, a nonprofit healthcare company. They offer financial help for health care services received at their locations. You must meet requirements based on the following to qualify:

  • Insurance coverage
  • Income
  • Family size
  • Assets
  • Other issues

If you can’t get your bill reduced or eliminated, ask about payment plans. Your provider may offer low or no interest payment plans, which can save you cash in the long run.

These can help providers obtain some of the money they’re owed and helps you spread out the payments.

2. Your Church

If you’re facing a major medical emergency, it can’t hurt to ask your church for help. A church may be able to set up a fundraiser, which can help cover some or all of the cost of your medical bills.

If your church has a wide reach, the congregation could help rally the community behind your cause. A larger community can lead to more help to escape from your medical debt.

3. Fundraising Sites Like GoFundMe

Your church isn’t your only option for fundraising to help pay medical bills. You can set up a fundraiser on sites such as GoFundMe.

There are many of these fundraising sites online, and you can find the one that best fits your needs. Remember that each site charges for their services in different ways.

No matter which platform you choose, you’ll need to get your story out there that way people can learn about your situation. Craft a sincere and compelling reason why they should donate—this can help your story stand out.

If you get enough people to help, it could cover a chunk or the entire cost of your medical debt.

4. Catastrophic Illness in Children Relief Funds

Some states even offer Catastrophic Illness in Children Relief Funds. These include Massachusetts and New Jersey.

Each state’s program may work differently. Check to see if your state offers a similar fund.

5. Disease-Specific Organizations

Some organizations offer help to pay medical bills that are related to specific illnesses. Here are a few examples.

The HealthWell Foundation

The HealthWell Foundation might be able to help you pay your medical bills. In particular, they provide financial assistance for the following:

  • Prescription co pays
  • Health insurance premiums, deductible, and coinsurance
  • Pediatric treatment costs
  • Travel costs

To qualify, you need to:

  • Receive treatment in the United States
  • Have a household income of no more than 400 to 500 percent of the federal poverty level
  • Have some form of health insurance
  • Have an illness or disease covered by a HealthWell Disease Fund
  • Have your medication be listed under the applicable HealthWell Disease Fund

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society offers many programs to help pay for medical bills. They can help with co-pay assistance for prescription drugs, travel assistance and more.

They also offer resources that can help with your medical debt. Be sure to check out their free booklet about Cancer and Your Finances.

The PAN (Patient Access Network) Foundation

The PAN Foundation focuses on removing financial barriers to medications and treatments essential for care. They offer nearly 70 programs tailored to specific diseases.

These programs can help pay for out-of-pocket costs, travel expenses, and health insurance premiums. Check out their list of programs on their website to see if they can help with your medical debt.

The CancerCare Co-Payment Assistance Foundation

The CancerCare Co-Payment Assistance Foundation aims to help people with cancer make their co-payments for chemotherapy and other targeted treatments.

They have a list of particular cancers they are accepting assistance applications for. You can find out if you qualify after selecting a specific cancer diagnosis on their Covered Diagnoses chart.

They may not currently have funding for your specific cancer diagnosis. In this case, their co-payment specialists may be able to help. They can provide information about other resources that may be able to help.

6. Medical Billing Advocates

Medical billing advocates won’t pay your medical bills for you, but they can help get your bills reduced.

These advocates know medical billing inside out. They can spot medical billing errors you might not catch yourself. Additionally, they may know what billing items can be negotiated to lower prices than what you’ve been billed.

A billing advocate that reduces your medical bills essentially reduces your medical debt. Unfortunately, billing advocates often charge for their services and sometimes, they can be expensive.

However, you may be able to find free assistance through your workplace’s benefits program. Another option could be through charitable organizations like the Patient Advocate Foundation.

Take Action to Start Paying Off Your Debt

Now that you’re aware of some of these organizations that help pay medical bills, it’s time to take action.

Reach out to the organizations that could help you with your specific situation. Follow up to make sure you’ve provided all of the necessary information to request help.

Also, work to start paying off the debt yourself. Consider help from these organizations only if you have to.

Remember in the future that if your medical condition isn’t critical, you do have options when it comes to seeking treatment.

If a hospital stay is unavoidable though, remember that you do have options—such as these—with helping to pay off medical debt.

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Written By

Lance Cothern

Lance Cothern is a freelance writer and founder of the personal finance blog Money Manifesto.

Read more about Lance

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